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Northern Virginia vs. Southern and Central Virginia

Justinian IJustinian I Posts: 1,362Registered User Member
edited February 2011 in University of Virginia
I have heard that it is easier for a person from central and southern va to become accepted into UVA rather than NO.VA Is this true? I guess No VA is more competitive.
Post edited by Justinian I on

Replies to: Northern Virginia vs. Southern and Central Virginia

  • theslammertheslammer Posts: 226Registered User Junior Member
    Basically true..as I understand it UVA likes to keep a good mix of people from all over Virginia, and there are not only tons of students in Northern Virginia but the quality of schools there is very high as well.
  • sv3asv3a Posts: 751Registered User Member
    I think theoretically due to the high population numbers in Northern Virginia UVA tries to select people from a more areas of Virginia. However, the actual degree of variation is small, and there are still an immense number of people from up there. It seems like all the students with lower than average qualifications that are still here anyway come from NoVa, so I'm inclined to believe that perhaps they're taking too many from that area from what I've seen so far.
  • meeajaymeeajay Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    Hi guys,
    i am planning to join MS (comp. science) in UNVA, how good is the university?
  • Dean JDean J Posts: 3,860College Rep Senior Member
    Of the VA population at UVa, about a third if it comes from northern Virginia.

    I believe there are 95 counties in Virginia and 39 cities (per the map I just found online...I could be off). NOVA would probably be about 6-8 of those counties/cities.

    There are no quotas within the Commonwealth. Applications are reviewed in light of what is offered at their school. Someone believe that students from schools with limited options (often rural) are somehow less qualified. We do not.
  • sabaraysabaray Posts: 4,395Registered User Senior Member
    Someone believe that students from schools with limited options (often rural) are somehow less qualified. We do not.

    Thank you, Dean J.
  • ChrisTKDChrisTKD Posts: 904Registered User Member
    DeanJ writes "There are no quotas within the Commonwealth. Applications are reviewed in light of what is offered at their school. Someone believe that students from schools with limited options (often rural) are somehow less qualified. We do not."

    I applaud that stance but it doesn't necessarily mean that it's not easier to get in if an applicant comes from a rural part of Virginia. I know of a family that moved to NoVA from a more rural location. All of the kids were in the advanced classes and considered the "smart" kids in their more rural school system. In their county, all three kids were at the top of their class and were able to participate in many extra-curricular activities. When they moved to NoVA they had a really tough adjustment period as the kids were no longer considered "gifted" but only average. The guidance counselor even told the mother that while one of the girls was above-average in x county she was below-average in NoVA. Moreover, in NoVa the kids couldn't simply join a sports team as they had to compete against many other kids to earn the right just to be on the team.

    When applying to college those particular kids would have been at the top of their class with a long list of activities versus middle grades and limited activities in NoVa. Results: oldest girl attends a second tier university in Maryland; second girl is attending community college at NoVA; the boy is still in HS but may need to take the community college route.

    While the class work may not have been as challenging in the rural county, I often wonder whether kids would be better off in the long run if they are able to develop in that rural system versus NoVA.
  • wahoombwahoomb Posts: 741Registered User Member
    No offense to rural Virginians, but in a politics class, for example, when the professor asks for a 15 page research paper your first year and you hear gasps, you can tell who hasn't done an IB extended essay or been used tons of papers in high school.
  • Dean JDean J Posts: 3,860College Rep Senior Member
    ECs shouldn't be part of this discussion. Whatever students do is fine. The word "limited" doesn't really come into my mind when I look at ECs. We're looking for students to have some involvement. The number of ECs isn't a factor.
  • hazelorbhazelorb Posts: 3,161Registered User Senior Member
    This discussion happens every year... I like to present the facts and leave you to draw your own conclusions. Here is a thread where I have linked some of the articles before, http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/university-virginia/635665-sat-act-25th-75th-percentile.html
    it is easier for a person from central and southern va to become accepted into UVA rather than NO.VA
    The argument against this is that almost if not every rural student admitted is a valedictorian/salutorian. The argument for is "would they still have been valedictorians in NOVA"/how (un)prepared are they in contrast/retention rate due to academic performance/standardized test scores are considerably different, most of which have been discussed above.
  • sparklesheensparklesheen Posts: 168Registered User Junior Member
    Hmm. I don't know about Central and South Virginia in general, but UVA does take a disproportionate number of students from Albemarle County... that's my perception, anyway. :) I was stunned when I first read the profiles of NOVA students that were rejected from UVA.
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