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Read: Average salaries among art schools for professors

taxguytaxguy Posts: 6,525Registered User Senior Member
The Chronicle of Higher Education's edition for faculty salaries came out.What is interesting is that most universities with strong research departments pay their professors more than just masters level institutions ( 90K vs 75K). I was checking, however, the average salaries of professors at some selected art schools,which I found very illuminating:

1. RISD about $82,000
2. Calarts $63,400
3. Pratt Institute $62,900
4. Ringling $61,900
5. Otis $56,741
6. Laguna College of Art $54,276
7. School of Visual Arts: a horrible $47,800. In fact, most "for profit" schools pay their faculty much less than that of non-profits.

Also, these numbers should be factored in with cost of living. For example, Florida has no income tax, which makes Ringling's salaries a lot better than it looks. Calarts is in an expensive area etc.
Post edited by taxguy on

Replies to: Read: Average salaries among art schools for professors

  • musicamusicamusicamusica Posts: 5,110Registered User Senior Member
    I have several friends who are faculty in the fine arts and design. (Art Center--Pasadena mostly)
    They usually regard the meager salaries as supplemental to their continuing careers in applied arts.
  • taxguytaxguy Posts: 6,525Registered User Senior Member
    Updated salary information for most other popular stand alone art schools and art programs. Note: I have not generally included universities because I am not sure that the average salary for a university is what they would pay for art professors.
    ____________________________________________________________

    The Chronicle of Higher Education's edition for faculty salaries came out.What is interesting is that most universities with strong research departments pay their professors more than just masters level institutions ( 90K vs 75K). I was checking, however, the average salaries of professors at some selected art schools,which I found very illuminating. I also did some research on the web for schools not mentioned by the Chronicle of Higher Education:
    1.Carnegie Mellon $136,000 ( but would doubt that art professors are paid same as other professors)
    2. RISD about $82,000
    3.Rochester Institute of Technology $73,012
    4. Fashion Institute of Technology in NY: $71,507
    5. MICA $65,574
    6. Calarts $63,400
    7. Pratt Institute $62,900
    8. Ringling $61,900
    9.SCAD $61,055
    10. Academy of Art University $57,581
    11. Otis $56,741
    12. Digital Media Arts college $56,000
    13. Digipen Institute of Technology ~ $54,000
    14. Laguna College of Art $54,276
    15. Art Center College of Design: $52,757
    16. Cleveland Institute of Art: $51,975
    17.Columbus College of Art: $48,140
    18. School of Visual Arts: a horrible $47,800. In fact, most "for profit" schools pay their faculty much less than that of non-profits.
    19California College of the Art: $46,983
    20.Ex'pression College For Digital Arts $33,777
    21. Full Sail: $ A horrible $31,540

    Also, these numbers should be factored in with cost of living. For example, Florida has no income tax, which makes Ringling's salaries a lot better than it looks. Calarts is in an expensive area as is Academy of Art University, etc.

    I have published this list because, in theory, the more well-known teachers will probably gravitate to the better paying institutions. I would think that if an institution pays well below the national average, a more intensive scrutiny should occur before enrolling there.

    A final observation is that generally "for profit" schools pays their faculty less than non profits.
  • hoveringmomhoveringmom Posts: 383Registered User Member
    taxguy, this is precisely why I'm a secondary school teacher as opposed to a college teacher. And this is assuming that you can get the tenure track jobs! I have my MFA in fiction, but it takes a very, very long time to build up to a tenure track position - basically you have to work two years here, one year there, publish a story here, a story there. Gradually, after about 5 years, you can possibly (possibly) get your tenure track job, earning....Well, what you've listed. $40-$50K is TYPICAL. This is precisely why I've been so worried about my daughter getting her BFA in art.
  • taxguytaxguy Posts: 6,525Registered User Senior Member
    hoveringmom, this is the average faculty salary at state alone art schools.

    First, universities do generally pay a bit better than stand alone art schools.


    Second, many of these professors have side businesses or side jobs. In fact, in art and design, this is encouraged. If you add up the side income,which can be substantial, the overal compensation might be quite decent.
  • hoveringmomhoveringmom Posts: 383Registered User Member
    taxguy, I speak as someone with personal experience in this matter. As I said, I have my MFA in fiction. I've taught college for three years. Obviously, writing is different from art--I'd say actually that writing is EASIER than art to making a living 'on the side.' Your stats are just that--stats. On average, you can expect to earn $40-$50 K in the beginning. And that's also what secondary school teachers earn (in NJ). Yes, if you're a tenured professor you'll earn more. But depending on the state you teach in for secondary school, you also earn more. Of course I'm also saying this a bit tongue in cheek; there are many positives to a university life, over secondary school teaching. But salary is not really one of them. The real positive is the chance it gives you to promote your art. Once you teach in the secondary school system, you are no longer 'connected.' However, a university life is not particularly easy. Lots and lots of politics. It's not for everyone. Also, it's becoming increasingly difficult to get a tenure track position at all. (Adjunct teaching, which I've done, earns considerably less money. $30K if you're lucky, $25K more typically.) Merely earning your MFA in any field does not give you the open door by any means. (And certainly a BFA does not.) The pity of it is that our young people have a vision of being an artist that does not really include the vision of university politics, since they cannot know this; they drift into the field and suddenly find themselves in a university setting and unable to do their art because of lack of time, inability to negotiate politics, backstabbing by others, you name it. My whole point is that it is a hard life, and one that should be chosen with open eyes. I'm not against it.
  • taxguytaxguy Posts: 6,525Registered User Senior Member
    hoveringmom, I have a number of relatives who are professors, and I completely agree with you about the politics in college. Folks might think that colleges are "apolitical" and very ethical institutions. They would be surprises at how both statements are quite false in many places.

    I published the average salaries NOT to encourage folks to go into college teaching. My main purpose was for parents to consider average salaries when evaluting colleges for their kids. Generally, the higher the pay, the better the chance of getting top people. It may not be a direct corelation,but it probably is indicative of the faculty quality.
  • hoveringmomhoveringmom Posts: 383Registered User Member
    Taxguy, Ah ha, I'm dense--Now I see. Since my D is thinking of eventually earning her MFA and perhaps teaching in college, I was thinking in terms of what's possible for her. That's an interesting idea of checking out salaries as a way of gauging quality of teaching. It is probably accurate in a very very rough way, as a general rule of thumb, but it leaves out many many many variables, such as prestige (people are more willing to be paid less if their institution is connected and well-regarded), and cost of living in the area. You're probably saying the same thing, but pay comparisons should be used with caution. For instance, my ex didn't get tenure at a major top-ranked public university and had to accept a job at sort of fourth-tier institution. Sad, except for the fact that his salary went UP by $40K. Yes, that's right--$40,000. And believe me, the new place is fourth tier, if that. It's just that the new place has far better funding and is connected to the medical faculty, which are always paid more. The major top ranked university paid less than the two lesser ones in the state. It had the prestige.
  • vicelarkvicelark Posts: 26Registered User New Member
    Are those monthly or annual salaries?
  • taxguytaxguy Posts: 6,525Registered User Senior Member
    Vicelark, monthly? hehe. They are average annual salaries.
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