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Yale releases early app count: 4,514

gibbygibby Posts: 6,418Registered User Senior Member
edited December 2012 in Yale University
Yale releases early app count | Cross Campus

For the Class of 2017, Yale received a total 4,514 early applications.

The number is a slight increase from last year’s count of 4,323 early applications, though it is lower than the 5,257 applications received in 2010 — before Harvard and Princeton reinstated their early action programs. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel said in an email that he expects to admit somewhere between 650 and 750 applicants in the early process.

“Once again, we are seeing an extraordinary range and diversity among the most accomplished students in the world seeking to do their undergraduate work at Yale,” he said.

The Nov. 1 Early Action deadline was pushed back multiple times this year in light of power outages and other inconveniences caused by Hurricane Sandy.

Dartmouth, Brown and the University of Pennsylvania received 1,526, 2,957, and 4,780 early applications, respectively. Cornell, Columbia, Princeton and Harvard have not released their early application numbers at this time.
Post edited by gibby on
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Replies to: Yale releases early app count: 4,514

  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    Slight?! That's over a 4% increase!

    So, let's do some math.

    Yale's acceptance rate will be between 14.4% and 16.6% If Yale accept 700 people, that's an acceptance rate of about 15.5%, or 3 in 20 people (1.5 in 10).

    Yale accepted 675 people last year with an acceptance rate of about 15.68%.

    I've more math to do...
  • Bestillandknow0Bestillandknow0 Posts: 91Registered User Junior Member
    Been waiting for this, thanks gibby. I'm so PSYCHED lets go...

    28 days until Judgement Day.
  • Bestillandknow0Bestillandknow0 Posts: 91Registered User Junior Member
    Also, Philo in your math don't forget to calculate in athletes, who make up ~150 of the slots. Therefore, the true acceptances are around 500-650.

    EDIT: Ninjaed by gibby, as per usual.

    EDITofEDIT: I don't quite agree gibby, as I don't think you can consider legacies, URMS, and Questbridge in the same category as athletes. Athletes are in. These groups are not. As a legacy, I wish your analysis was the case, but who knows.
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    You'll have to be more attractive than about 3800 other highly qualified applicants to get accepted.

    I wonder how many of these are crapshoots, atheletic recruits, completely obviously geniuses, high scoring URMs?
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    You first have to exclude Yale's athletic recruits (about 177, based upon the above article), all of whom apply early.

    I was looking for that stat. ^^

    For my purposes, I'm not excluding URMs (that would be excluding myself). You don't think they aim for more hooks than that during the early admissions period?

    Of course, many of those athletes are themselves URMs, legacies, development cases, etc.

    But still super-useful for everyone. Even by Gibby's approximation, the "average" applicant's chances of getting in are boosted, which is accurate.
    Also, Philo in your math don't forget to calculate in athletes, who make up ~150 of the slots. Therefore, the true acceptances are around 500-650.

    EDIT: Ninjaed by gibby, as per usual.

    lol athlete admits aren't "fake" acceptances
  • gibbygibby Posts: 6,418Registered User Senior Member
    ^^ Sorry, my post is below.

    Athletes hope next president will raise recruitment | Yale Daily News

    You first have to exclude Yale's athletic recruits (about 177, based upon the above article), all of whom apply early.

    Then, you have to exclude URM's, legacy's, developmental cases and Questbridge applicants, which probably equals the same number. So, let's see: that's 177 x-2 = 354 - 700 (assumed acceptances) = 346 (available SCEA slots).

    So, doing the math (and correct me if I'm wrong): Excluding the calculated recruited athletes, URM's, legacy's, developmental cases and Questbridge applicants from the overall total, you get 4,160 students. (4514 - 354 = 4160.)

    346 (available slots) divided by 4160 (non-hooked applicants) times 100 = 8.31% acceptance rate. That's what my antiquated math tells me. Any naysayers?
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    There are some stats on African American early admits at top colleges somewhere on JBHE...
  • Bestillandknow0Bestillandknow0 Posts: 91Registered User Junior Member
    In no way was I saying athletes are "fake" acceptances. They are held to a high standard, especially at Yale. I'm just saying that in the 650-750 number, there are already 177 slots filled. Therefore, the amount of available spots are fewer. That's all.
  • Tobias98Tobias98 Posts: 6Registered User New Member
    Some of them are... football, ice hockey... There may not be as many recruits as some people want, but there definitely are lower standards for some teams' recruits. I've seen it.
  • lacrossemomlacrossemom Posts: 630Registered User Member
    Does anyone have stats of URM students accepted in SCEA? When I look at the above referenced JBHE article, it doesn't list % of students, but number of enrolled students.
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    I've been working on it.

    Here's what I have so far, some of it stretches things, but it's something.

    I'm betting Gibby's second number is higher than he's asserted — doing educatedish guesses for african americans and native americans alone takes up 121 of those 177 spots.

    ***
    One approach:

    Early admissions is a time for top colleges to gobble up as many hooks as they can. So that might mean that a disproportionate amount of each hook are admitted early. When it comes to URMs, though, this might be countervailed by the relative scarcity of URMs who apply to Yale early compared to other groups.

    Yale's percentage of African Americans hovers around 8.7% — for a class of 1355 students — thus about 118 African Americans. Yale's yield rate for the class of 2016 was about 68.6 percent. This would mean that around 1.46 times as many blacks were accepted (if their yield rate to top colleges is like that of the general population) — around 172.28. The yield rate in SCEA should have been much higher than the yield rate, regular round.

    From this I'd bet that at least 100 of Yale's early admissions will be given to African Americans, if not more.

    The truth of this assessment depends on the fuzzy truth of my assumptions about black admittee yield and early round bias for URMs.

    ***
    Another approach:

    At harvard in 2012, African Americans constituted about 9% of the 4245 early applying pool. Since they are similar schools with similar admissions and finaid policies, I'll shamelessly extrapolate. That's about 382 applicants. (26.1% acceptance rate at Yale!!) Unless, you know, Harvard attracts all the top early-applying black applicants (possible, a man can dream, etc.)

    For all URMs (Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans), there about 819 of Harvard early applicants of these groups (19.3% of the pool).

    Also:
    Native Americans should have close to a 50% acceptance rate at Harvard, especially in the early admit rounds (since they constitute slightly over 1 % of the class and only slightly over 1% apply early) — that takes away around 21 more seats.

    Sources:
    Harvard Gazette: College Class of 2010 is the most diverse in Harvard history (much over half of applicants with at least one perfect SAT score!!)
    http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/yale-university/1416504-yale-releases-early-app-count-4-514-a.html (lol)
    JBHE Annual Survey: Black First-Year Students at the Nation’s Leading Research Universities : The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (yessss.)
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    Now to suppose how qualified these black applicants are by applying statistics in highly questionable ways.
  • gibbygibby Posts: 6,418Registered User Senior Member
    URM's currently make up 14% of Yale's incoming class, whereas legacies, including children of Yale faculty, make up 10% of Yale's incoming class. See: The Decline of Legacy Admissions at Yale - Innovations - The Chronicle of Higher Education
  • lacrossemomlacrossemom Posts: 630Registered User Member
    I like the math and it makes sense. Agree that using Harvard's breakout will give us an idea. DD was just contacted for interview, so will stay positive.
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    14%???? That's amazing. My math used 9%. So the numbers should be a lot higher. I'll do the math again later.

    From JBHE: The Widening Racial Scoring Gap on the SAT College Admissions Test
    If we raise the top-scoring threshold to students scoring 750 or above on both the math and verbal SAT — a level equal to the mean score of students entering the nation's most selective colleges such as Harvard, Princeton, and CalTech — we find that in the entire country 244 blacks scored 750 or above on the math SAT and 363 black students scored 750 or above on the verbal portion of the test

    I can't find stats identifying who did well on both sections, which annoys me. But given this pool, and then just thinking of how much of this pool decided to apply SCEA to Yale...I feel good.

    Also:
    But only 1,132 African-American college-bound students scored 700 or above on the math SAT and only 1,205 scored at least 700 on the verbal SAT.

    700s are a bit less competitive (read as rare). Instead of about at most 600 people, you have at most 2240 people. 1800 if you leave out the 750ers.
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