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yale legacy vs dartmouth ed

fasbkasfafasbkasfa Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
hs class of 2018 which school is more likely to select me?

Replies to: yale legacy vs dartmouth ed

  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,091 Senior Member
    Dartmouth by a long shot, don't even have to put in your stats, they have a much higher acceptance rate.
  • hebegebehebegebe Registered User Posts: 1,700 Senior Member
    edited August 22
    Agree.

    Dartmouth is really a somewhat large rural LAC that happens to be in the Ivy League. And because many students want to live in cities, Dartmouth is facing application declines like other rural LACs. Consequently they want to grab every talented ED applicant they can get.
  • fasbkasfafasbkasfa Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    even as a legacy?
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,091 Senior Member
    Legacy only gives a slight advantage.
  • YaleGradandDadYaleGradandDad Registered User Posts: 1,035 Senior Member
    Agree /\. Aside from belonging to the same athletic conference these schools strike me as very different and surely you should see one as a better fit than the other and this should play a higher role in deciding to ED Dartmouth than the admissions rate.
  • Tperry1982Tperry1982 Registered User Posts: 1,484 Senior Member
    Yes Yale and Dartmouth are very different and attract a different kind of student. Nearly 85 percent of Dartmouth's student body is Greek and if you don't want to be part of that lifestyle, you may want to think twice. Before you make a decision, spend time on both campuses after school starts and there are students on campus. You will see there are two distinct vibes and you can make a better decision about which school is the better fit. Good luck.
  • ShrmpngrtzShrmpngrtz Registered User Posts: 100 Junior Member
    85% is not possible because freshmen aren't allowed to rush until sophomore year. Last time I checked, the number was under 50%. But I agree with everything else.
  • Faulkner1897Faulkner1897 Registered User Posts: 249 Junior Member
    edited August 28
    @Shrmpngrtz - The way I read the Dartmouth data is that 80-85% of students who are eligible for Greek life (sophomores through seniors) are Greek. US News and World Report notes that 60 percent of students are members of Greek organizations, but this takes into account freshmen too, who are not eligible.
  • donnaleighgdonnaleighg Registered User Posts: 1,096 Senior Member
    when we toured Dartmouth with my son in 2014, I recall that they said that something like 75% of upperclassmen, so that's in line with you @Faulkner1897. That was a big reason my son did not apply there, as he wasn't interested in Greek life. As a side note, a family friend went there and hated the party-greek atmosphere and left after one quarter. She waited out the year and entered as a frosh at another school she was accepted at (MIT) and was much happier there.
  • ShrmpngrtzShrmpngrtz Registered User Posts: 100 Junior Member
    @Faulkner1897 @donnaleighg Here are the official numbers for the 2015-2016 academic year from the Dartmouth Fact Book.

    Sophomores 711 out of 1125 (63%)
    Juniors 708 out of 1078 (65%)
    Seniors 708 out of 1031 (68%)

    So, if you are looking at eligible students, the numbers are 2127 out of 3234 (66%).

    That year, the incoming class (freshman) was ~1110, so the overall % of students in Greek organizations is ~49%.
  • ShrmpngrtzShrmpngrtz Registered User Posts: 100 Junior Member
    Here's the link to the Fact Book if you are interested in doing some fact-checking.

    http://www.dartmouth.edu/~oir/data-reporting/factbook/index.html
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,091 Senior Member
    Still those are significant numbers of students involved in Greek life.
  • Tperry1982Tperry1982 Registered User Posts: 1,484 Senior Member
    The numbers may not be as high as I stated, but the vibe of Dartmouth - well known throughout the Ivy League - is that of a Greek heavy school. Not saying that is wrong - I'm Greek myself. Just stating a fact. At Yale, the Greek population is minuscule and almost invisible.
  • ShrmpngrtzShrmpngrtz Registered User Posts: 100 Junior Member
    edited September 6
    @Tperry1982 If you look at my post (#7), I agreed with everything else in your post. I'm not disagreeing with you that Dartmouth has a large number of students involved in Greek life. I just pointed out that your "nearly 85%" comment was not correct according to the latest data published by Dartmouth.

    And apologies to the OP for going completely off topic.
  • Tperry1982Tperry1982 Registered User Posts: 1,484 Senior Member
    ^^ It's all good. Upon re-reading your comment, I see we agree, mostly. I guess my dislike of Dartmouth is showing. It just gives me bad vibes and my D hated the campus the moment she set foot on it. And again, I'm Greek so that is not the reason.
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