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31 ACT score for 13.125 year old on math?

PurePhysicsPurePhysics Registered User Posts: 357 Member
edited September 2011 in ACT Preparation
Hey guys, I got a 31 on my ACT math as a kid who just turned 13 1.5 months ago. Is this good for my age? What can I do to improve?
Post edited by PurePhysics on
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Replies to: 31 ACT score for 13.125 year old on math?

  • texaspgtexaspg Super Moderator Posts: 16,595 Super Moderator
    The score has nothing to do with your age. It is a matter of your grade level and what have completed studying.
  • PurePhysicsPurePhysics Registered User Posts: 357 Member
    I'm in eighth, just starting algebra II.
  • PurePhysicsPurePhysics Registered User Posts: 357 Member
    How does it translate to an SAT score?
  • FreedomEagleFreedomEagle Registered User Posts: 458 Member
    ^^ really good SAT , i think probablly +600 .
  • floridadad55floridadad55 Registered User Posts: 2,262 Senior Member
    I disagree with the above posts, especially the one about your age not mattering.

    I think that poster seems to think that if you have already taken algebra and geometry, that the score you got is likely to be close to your ultimate score.

    Your score is tremendous, and I feel you will likely get a 34, 35, or 36 when you get older.

    My son raised his score from a 31 to a 34, in a few months, with zero studying. So age aside, you are likely to get even a higher score in the future. You have many years ahead of you.

    For example, my son, when he was about 13, got 50's on his PSATs, and eventually got a perfect 800 in CR and a perfect 800 in writing and a 700 in math.

    So your score is a tremendous score. Your test taking skills are likely to improve as you get older. I think you should take the SAT, and try to participate in the Duke TIP program, or the Johns Hopkins program, or whichever one they have in your geographic area.
  • PurePhysicsPurePhysics Registered User Posts: 357 Member
    I am hoping to join the Hopkins SET program after the SAT in October. For this I will need a 730 in math. Last year, in seventh grade I scored a 630 in math. But I have more tools and believe I can achieve this.
  • texaspgtexaspg Super Moderator Posts: 16,595 Super Moderator
    floridadad - I know of someone who scored 33 or 34 composite in 8th grade and went straight from middle school to college this year because a college he wanted to take summer classes in wanted him to take ACT and then determined he can start college early because he had finished several advanced classes in Math and sciences already and he was ready.

    ACT includes some level of precalc. so his score will go up once he gets through Algebra II and Precalc. It is what you know that gets you the score in Math and there are several 7th and 8th graders who have perfect ACT scores because they are closer to starting calculus than Algebra I.
  • floridadad55floridadad55 Registered User Posts: 2,262 Senior Member
    Pure Physics:

    there are many other programs for gifted kids that don't require a 730.

    my son did Duke TIP, for example, and he didn't have scores like that.
  • GreyWolfGreyWolf Registered User Posts: 281 Junior Member
    Your score is solid, and as mentioned earlier, you will most likely easily receive a 36 in Math a little down the road. My question to you is how involved are you in math competitions? These are, in my opinion, much better indicators of mathematical prowess. Furthermore, the problems are often much more elegant and I feel that a relatively adept individual like you would love them and gain much from participation.
  • RedSevenRedSeven Registered User Posts: 1,665 Senior Member
    My son raised his score from a 31 to a 34, in a few months, with zero studying. So age aside, you are likely to get even a higher score in the future. You have many years ahead of you.

    That's called being more prepared the second time by nature of having taken the test on a previous occasion. Further, he took a different version of the test.

    It wasn't the time that improved his score. Your argument is entirely illogical.

    ---
    To the OP:

    Your score indicates that (1) you're a strong test-taker; (2) you're probably quite intelligent; (3) you're ahead of the game in Math.

    I'm going to guess that these things come fairly naturally to you, and that you find you don't need to use most of the test-taking strategies that the books go on and on about (probably because they deal with how to guess, which you don't do very often). If that's the case, don't spend much time preparing.

    By the time you take the test in your junior year, you'll be much further along in Math than you are now. Even if you know all the concepts tested now, you'll be better (and faster) at them later, so you're in excellent shape to get a 36 on Math.

    You'll probably see relatively little improvement in your Reading score.

    You may see some improvement in your Science score (and find you need less time to complete the section) once you take some of the basic high school science courses (which, while unnecessary to get a 36, are helpful).

    Your English score may improve over time if you learn more grammar, but since most schools tend not to teach grammar (and most teachers tend to suck at it), you'll probably have to do this on your own.

    I wouldn't say your score is good for your age. I'd say it's just good. Regardless of age, a 31 is an excellent score and a strong indicator that with a bit of preparation and luck with the test you get, you can get a 36.

    Age is unlikely to be a significant factor in improving your score. High school coursework may help, as may a bit of preparation. I cannot, however, stress enough that you should not waste countless hours preparing for this test. You don't need to.

    The marginal benefit of additional preparation decreases as your score increases, both with respect to the benefit in increasing your score and with respect to the benefit in college admissions chances.
  • vlinesvlines Registered User Posts: 3,579 Senior Member
    What were the rest of your scores?
    I disagree that your reading will not improve with age, it will improve based on the fact that you have not had any classes yet that provide any type of prep for these type of tests. So over time, your reading scores will improve.
    As for math, you took this test at the ideal time. Right after you finished with the classes that are represented on this test. My 12th grader took the same basic math courses you have, including Algebra II as an 8th grader. He has to review basic math prior to SAT/ACT testing this year to remember some of the topics tested because those courses were so long ago! LOL
    Still, good job, and a great score!
  • PurePhysicsPurePhysics Registered User Posts: 357 Member
    Fairly involved with math counts, etc. AMC 8, 10, 12 etc
  • PurePhysicsPurePhysics Registered User Posts: 357 Member
    Also, I am in honors chemistry and will take AP calc next year as a freshman
  • izelkayizelkay Registered User Posts: 407 Member
    What about Pre-Cal?
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