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Does the top universities prefer acceptance of top 5% students from a school, city, county or state?

compilercompiler 15 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
Does the top universities prefer acceptance of top 5% students from a school, city, county and state? If so, what other conditions for none top 5% students, such as top 20% students may get into the ivy league schools? Top athletes, national awards students etc are not within the scope of discussion. Thank you for your answer.
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Replies to: Does the top universities prefer acceptance of top 5% students from a school, city, county or state?

  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 6364 replies48 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,412 Senior Member
    AdComms evaluate students in the context of their school and their region. There is no magic line as to what % is accepted at any particular level. There are many, many valedictorians who are turned down by 'top' universities every year- and see lower ranked classmates get an offer. But, while there is no hard and fast %, it is still true that (esp for the fanciest names) being in the very top cohort of your class correlates with admissions.

    If your core question is 'I am in the top 20% of students in my class but not the top 10% but I really want to go to a particular school in a particular sports league so how can I do that?' read these:

    https://mitadmissions.org/blogs/entry/there_is_no_formula/
    https://mitadmissions.org/blogs/entry/applying_sideways/

    They are for MIT, but apply to all the super-selectives.
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  • compilercompiler 15 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    I have seen all top 10 students from a school get into good universities while the top 20 ones have not. The student ranking in a specific school or area is very important for admission into a good university. If an University receives a couple of applications from the same school, the university probably will pick the top one.
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  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 6364 replies48 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,412 Senior Member
    Were you asking a question or making a statement?
    Imo, there is a big difference between "top university" and "good universities". The tippy tops - the name brands that get so much attention on CC- are more likely to go for the top cohort (though I disagree that they reflexively will take #1 over #2 just b/c of the number- & I have seen plenty of examples of a lower # getting an offer over a higher #). But lots of people in the 10-20 tier - and farther- get into "good universities"
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  • mathmommathmom 32032 replies158 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 32,190 Senior Member
    There's not really a simple answer to that - it really depends on the school and what you mean by "top university". I do know that the 25th ranked kid in a class of 640 got into Brown. I know that no one (that I know of) has gotten into Harvard or Yale without being in the top 2 percent of our class. The year my older son applied Number 1 and number 8 got in, number 3 was waitlisted. I know my younger son missed top 5% of the class by one kid. He got into U of Chicago (EA), Tufts and Vassar, but rejected from Harvard, Brown and Georgetown (SFS). Since his transcript was full of B+'s, (and B's in Latin), we were actually surprised at the reaches that did accept him.

    Your best source of info is the GC's at your school.
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  • compilercompiler 15 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    I am asking the question but can provide what I saw too. The question is for getting more info from the others how the AO actually selects the applicants. Do not be surprised about it but is common.
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  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 6364 replies48 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,412 Senior Member
    There is, believe it or not, some genuine "fit" piece. Example: the #1 student who was accepted to Princeton but turned down by Stanford, which did take the student ranked #14 from the same class. Still in the same class, #2 was accepted at Harvard but turned down by Yale, which did accept #11. So, all tippy-top kids- but with rejections from tippy-top schools, in favor of "lower" ranked students. That's why people put more emphasis on top X% of the class: within that % the differences in rank are really not that meaningful.

    Go read The Gatekeepers for more of a look at how AOs work
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76570 replies665 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 77,235 Senior Member
    If the "top university" is University of Texas - Austin, it prefers to take the top 6% of each Texas high school.
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  • RichInPittRichInPitt 581 replies8 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 589 Member
    edited June 28
    Actually, it's Texas state law that requires it, so it says nothing about their preferences.

    "State law requires UT-Austin to provide automatic admission to students near the top of their high school class, but allows them to cap their automatic admittees at three-fourths of each freshman class. The remaining quarter is admitted through a holistic process, which takes into account grades, standardized test scores, race and extracurricular activities.
    ...
    The rules for UT-Austin are adjusted each year to allow it to avoid being overwhelmed with automatic admittees."

    You'd have to look at the remaining 1/4 to understand their preferences.
    edited June 28
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 28352 replies56 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 28,408 Senior Member
    There are times a college has a particular need for a certain type of student that has a certain skill, and will break from eliminating such students for not being the upper nth percent of the class.

    The reality is for most schools, only the top 5 kid, are even considered. Not five % but 5 kids. Exceptions for those schools that are on the college radar of preselecting their students so that s larger % of them than usual are top students that are in a highly competitive setting
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  • MorningsiderMorningsider 92 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 92 Junior Member
    LOL I got into an Ivy though my GPA wasn't even in the top 2/3 of my high school class. This was in 1980. Things sure have changed since then.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 32757 replies350 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 33,107 Senior Member
    OP needs to learn what "holistic" means. He's making statements based on assumptions, maybe something anecdotal.
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  • compilercompiler 15 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    Lookingfoward, you actually have made an assumption as maybe.
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  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger 2681 replies139 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,820 Senior Member
    Those with the best chance of being admitted with otherwise subpar stats are recruited athletes. Many high schools do not rank. An adcom may not know whether a kid is top 5% or top 20% of their class by GPA.
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  • skieuropeskieurope 37959 replies6570 discussionsSuper Moderator Posts: 44,529 Super Moderator
    An adcom may not know whether a kid is top 5% or top 20% of their class by GPA.
    The school profile, though, will usually provide GPA by decile or quintile, so an AO can guess if the GPA is closer to the top or bottom of the break. Not exact, but it'snot like the AO is flying blind. And if multiple applicants are from the same HS, the AO will certainly review those GPAs against one another.
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  • compilercompiler 15 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    You are right, especially the university receives several applications from the same school. It is easy for the AO to select the top students. This is very common for the in-state top university to select the students because the same school students usually aim the in-state top university first. As the result, the competition for the same school students will become very competitive.
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