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The Unseen Student Victims of the “Varsity Blues”

RiversiderRiversider 868 replies103 threads Member
edited October 8 in Athletic Recruits

Replies to: The Unseen Student Victims of the “Varsity Blues”

  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 23256 replies17 threads Senior Member
    I don't think the Varsity Blues kids kept others off the teams or took their scholarships. They are 'extras' on the teams and didn't displace another athlete but may have displaced another applicant to the school. How would those be identified? What would their loses be if they had to go to Duke instead of UCA?
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  • one1ofeachone1ofeach 203 replies9 threads Junior Member
    This is really a two part story. One is about a kid who didn't target correctly for admissions and probably should have expanded his list beyond one selective dream school. The other part is about college admissions bribery etc. I don't see a strong connection between the two. Did the first kid apply to Georgetown and was kept out by the fraudulent tennis player?
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 23256 replies17 threads Senior Member
    No, the good tennis player only wanted to go to Cal Poly.

    The only thing these kids have in common is that they went to the same high school and both played tennis.
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  • GoodtoKnowGoodtoKnow 19 replies0 threads Junior Member
    I await this issue's delivery and was unable to read the online version so I can't comment on content of article. I know a '20 girl who was a top recruit for an "elite" sport at one of the implicated colleges. The coach was fired and pleaded guilty. Interim head coach (who knew this athlete) said that not only could he not pursue any of the guilty coach's recruits, he was disallowed to recruit ANY athletes for '24. Walk-ons only. So, her dream college hopes were dashed. Yes, she has since accepted offer at another great college and "victim" may be too strong of a word, but there has been collateral damage to aspiring college athletes in the aftermath of this scandal.
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  • TanbikoTanbiko 368 replies2 threads Member
    edited October 11
    The good tennis player had a UTR ranking of 11 and a Tennis Recruiting ranking of 300+ (3 star recruit). He was nowhere close to being recruited at Georgetown or Cal Poly. He did not lose his spot to the bad tennis player because he was not good enough to play at a mid-level D1 or even top D3 in spite of all the time and money his family spent on the sport. High school wins mean nothing unless you play other highly ranked players but the story makes for a dramatic read.

    By the way, the Georgetown coach did recruit legitimate tennis players in addition to selling some spots away. He did not have much athletic money to offer, only prestige and semi-decent need-based aid.
    edited October 11
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