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AP Stats w/o Algebra 2 Class

scifi101scifi101 Registered User Posts: 10 New Member
Hi! I'm going to be in the 10th grade next year and I was wondering if you had advice on this predicament:
I have been approved to take AP Stats but I don't know if my background in math is solid enough. I have taken hnrs. geometry but i plan on self-sudying Algebra 2 this summer (or as much of it as i can finish). So, would this self-study be enough to get an A in stats?

Replies to: AP Stats w/o Algebra 2 Class

  • scifi101scifi101 Registered User Posts: 10 New Member
  • TheEarlyBirdTheEarlyBird Registered User Posts: 341 Member
    You don't really need knowledge of algebra 2 for stats--at least that's how I remember it. Stats has its own formulas to determine probabilities and whatnot. But those formulas aren't all that complex, mostly just plugging numbers in. I think you'll be fine.
  • scifi101scifi101 Registered User Posts: 10 New Member
    thanks @TheEarlyBird‌ anyone else have suggestions?
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 27,730 Super Moderator
    You would not have been approved for the class if they didn't think you could handle it. I think you will be fine.
  • MITer94MITer94 Registered User Posts: 4,735 Senior Member
    The only alg/pre-calc material I remember in AP Stats was the use of logarithms (e.g. logarithmic transformation).

    Then again, most stats classes in college go more in-depth. AP Stats doesn't even mention the PDF for a normal distribution.
This discussion has been closed.