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Anyone taking AP Chinese?

the.j.shithe.j.shi 100 replies32 threads. Junior Member
edited July 2006 in AP Tests Preparation
Is anyone taking AP Chinese next year? It's going to be the first AP Chinese test college board will offer. I won't have a class to study from, so I plan to self study it. I was born in China, but moved to the US when I was 4, so my Chinese is not exactly top knotch, but I can read the simple stuff. What prep book should I use? Is there a text book out there?
edited July 2006
24 replies
Post edited by the.j.shi on
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Replies to: Anyone taking AP Chinese?

  • ChobokingChoboking 318 replies13 threadsRegistered User Member
    there is no specific books for this course yet. you probably just have to wait until next year for them to be published. as for how hard, most people don't know. but i think its probably going to be like the level of English Language and Composition (but in Chinese) just like how I heard Spanish Language and German Language was. It really boils down to what you perceive your level as, but, seeing that you came from China at age 4, your Chinese is probably the same as native-born American Chinese who speak Chinese at home.
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  • Ray192Ray192 1967 replies52 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Hey, I moved from China when I was 7 and I suck at. I can speak and listen pretty fluently (with Sichuan accent!), but my vocabulary/writing stink, with my reading skills a bit better.

    I won't take the test simply because I'll die.
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  • RainBellRainBell 110 replies10 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    i moved from China 2 years ago

    lol, i'm not going to take it,
    coz i have AP French and AP Spanish Next year
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  • Paulus89Paulus89 296 replies27 threadsRegistered User Member
    I've never lived in China and I don't understand any Chinese.


    SIGN ME UP!
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  • specifyspecify 725 replies1 threadsRegistered User Member
    I'm taking it as well as the subject test, I need to really brush up on my characters.
    For practice, I'm going to just read some newspapers, books, or really anything in chinese.

    And if you really have a thick accent (sichuan isn't that bad, or at least the one I've heard), you should start assigning pinyin or bopomofo to charactes to straighten your pronunciation out.
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  • NalconNalcon 412 replies78 threadsRegistered User Member
    "but i think its probably going to be like the level of English Language and Composition (but in Chinese) just like how I heard Spanish Language and German Language was. "

    Spanish language is MUCH easier of a test than English language assuming the same degree of proficiency in each language. The Spanish language test simply measures your ablility to communicate and understand the language, English tests analytical ability, writing skills, knowledge of rhetorical devices, etc. I would assume Chinese Language will be along the mold of Spanish language because there is no way(except possibly by a complete immersion program) a nonnative speaker could get to the level of proficiency needed in a test like English language in the course of high school.
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  • Ray192Ray192 1967 replies52 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    No, I can speak putonghua without any trouble. I just wanted to express how I could still do Sichuan accent.
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  • VanillaExtractVanillaExtract 256 replies13 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    the english language test is pretty damn hard... i can't imagine CB testing a foreign language with test that hard
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  • x3rosex3rose 526 replies21 threadsRegistered User Member
    i'm pretty sure it won't be like english language. but definitely more like spanish language & french. it's definitely possible to get a 5 on if you aren't a native speaker but it'd just be really easy for native speakers. also, knowing how majority of asians taking APs are overachievers, there won't be much of a curve.

    i hate being chinese but speaking a dialect no one has ever heard of. it's so obscure, there isn't even a NAME for it in english.
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  • specifyspecify 725 replies1 threadsRegistered User Member
    Where in China is the dialect located? I'm sure all dialects have a name, they usually just attach an "nese/ese" at the end of the city's name of its origin.

    It's definitely like other foreign language tests:

    http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/repository/ap05_chinese_draftcd__50118.pdf
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  • the.j.shithe.j.shi 100 replies32 threads. Junior Member
    So will AP Chinese be testing Chinese history too?
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  • Sgrhigh424Sgrhigh424 50 replies17 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Is there a speaking portion to the AP Chinese test? I can read/write Chinese kind of fluently but I speak Cantonese...and I know the AP test is based off mandarin...no fair.
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  • specifyspecify 725 replies1 threadsRegistered User Member
    click on my link, it gives the basic contents of the test.

    And yes there's a speaking part, it's in mandarin.
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  • the.j.shithe.j.shi 100 replies32 threads. Junior Member
    I read it and part of the ruberic tells the teacher to start by teaching the students some chinese history. Does that mean there will be history on the exam?
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  • youknowmeyouknowme 724 replies30 threadsRegistered User Member
    If i take the test, i ll get a 5. anyone wanna bet?
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  • specifyspecify 725 replies1 threadsRegistered User Member
    I read it and part of the ruberic tells the teacher to start by teaching the students some chinese history. Does that mean there will be history on the exam?

    It's a foreign language test just like spanish, french, german, etc, the main focus is the language ability, there is apparently "culture."

    On pages 9 and 10, there is an exam outline.
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  • AznN3rdAznN3rd 1223 replies69 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Even thouugh Ap chinese is going to be official next year, relativlely few schools offer and recognize it as a boost to your GPA. (High schools)
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  • oasisoasis 2012 replies57 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Yeah dude. My school is picking a few native speakers to "test out" AP Chinese so I get to take the test "for fun" come May.
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  • xiggixiggi 24571 replies872 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    If the SAT Subjects tests provide any guidelines, the AP Chinese won't be at the level of AP French nor Spanish. Since the SAT Chinese tests students at a level of 3 or 4th grade level, the AP will probably will be a 5th grade level for native Chinese.

    One has to wonder why this was ever considered, let alone approved. Jocular aberrations such as this one is what makes being a supporter of the integrity of The College Board harder by the week.
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  • oryxoryx 5 replies3 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Firstly, I am going to write this exam, and am fairly confident that I will get a 5, because I immigrated after finishing grade two (eight years old), am still fluent, and can read both simplified and traditional well. BUT. I am worried about the writing, as should everyone who is thinking of writing it and who had not finished what should be considered elementary school Chinese writing.

    Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea to write the AP Chinese if you don't have at least some semblance of a background in the language (by which I mean Mandarin or putonghua, the official language of PRoC) and/or culture. It's not like one of the Romance languages or even German, where at least the vocabulary or the grammar partially resembles that of English. And then, it's extremely difficult to learn.

    Firstly, do not assume that the exam will be a piece of cake for all native speakers. Learning Chinese is not like learning how to ride a bicycle; even adults who have known the language for all their lives may get rather "rusty" and forget what a certain character or phrase means. The best way to get ahead in Chinese is to keep using it, over and over again, preferably in an environment where you have no choice but to use only Chinese.

    Secondly, Chinese writing is going to be a problem for most non-native learners and indeed, many native speakers who'd emigrated away from China at a young age as well. The problem is that while linguistic skills and to a certain extent, reading skills, are comparatively easy to preserve, writing is not. And according to CB, the exam is going to occur completely on a computer -- speak into the computer's microphone, listen via its headphones, read the passages from its screen, and type using either pinyin or zhouyin on the keyboard. This means that fortunately, you do not have to be able to write every Chinese character that you need to use in a given essay, but you have to know a). how to "spell" it using one of the two given methods, and b). when given a list of characters all with the same pronunciation, know which one is the one you need.

    Thirdly, it's a completely different concept from most, if not all, Western languages. And honestly? For most of grade one in China, kids are learning pinyin -- the characters don't even start until later.

    Fourthly, there is going to be a really drastic curve and a 5 will actually probably take very solid knowledge that is beyond the level of what the SAT Subject Test might suggest, given the number of Chinese students who will probably take this exam.
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