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Architecture vs Engineering - or both?

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Replies to: Architecture vs Engineering - or both?

  • DontPanic1DontPanic1 373 replies12 threads Member
    My D was 'split-brained' too, so the first thing we looked at was architectural engineering - that seemed to make sense. But the curriculums we looked at basically seemed suited for a builder/contractor- HVAC, wiring, that kind of thing. Not at all what she had in mind. More research indicated that it takes more years to get an architecture degree and it typically takes many more years of working on senior architects' designs before your own creativity gets a chance to shine. She went into engineering and 4 years later is very happy in her new job applying her 'artistry' to software design.
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  • Rousse54Rousse54 487 replies33 threads Member
    What about majoring in architectural engineering? They have that major at CU Boulder
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  • csleslie51csleslie51 1068 replies104 threads Senior Member
    Alternatives - check out Stanford's D school Stanford Institute of Design | d.school | home and some of the things this group has done: Catapult Design
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  • MomfromKCMomfromKC 376 replies2 threads Member
    I'm going to throw this out there even though it might not fit - packaging engineer. They are the ones that came up with the new mayo and jelly lids that spread the food as you squeeze. It used to be just blister packs, but now it is so much more. If you want to design buildings go for it, but if smaller sleek but functional attracts you at all at least check it out.
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  • thackettthackett 3 replies0 threads New Member
    I faced a similar question upon making my college decision. I wanted to be a city planner but upon examining the payscale at that time I elected not to follow that path. I scored extremely high on the Architectural College Entrace exam and because I had a logical engineering thought process as well as high creative thought process I looked at my math SAT scores that said Architecture. You need a strength in math for engineering or architectural engineering. After a long period of decision making I then found acceptance to Architectural Schools is not a given and hard especilaly for out of state students. I applied and was accepted. After 1 year I transfered to Construction Management as the design education was highly artistic and not reality to building and architecture. In addition I found myself competing with highly skilled artistic individuals and would do well with design but moderate on presentation. Upon leaving the program my class advisor said I was making a mistake and would be locked in a room with a calulator my entire construction life. I graduated with a degree in construction management and 1 year of architecture and a long list of architectural and landscape architectural electives. I went to work in Real Estate Development and hired and managed more architects than a career in Architecture would have given me. The fact is as an Architectual Graduate you get the design detail work initally and it takes time to move into a project management or lead design postion. Look carefully at the University you choose. Clemson has a program where the Construction Management program is within the COllege of Architecture to build relationships early and tear down the often adversarial relationships that exist in the industry. Custom Home Building is a niche that gives one the ability to feed the design craving and not have an architectural degree. As for teh engineering side I would stay away form it as in both Engineering project management and design it is focused in the manner you speak of. The creativity in it is structural detail not architectural creativity. Follow your skills and abilities. Good luck
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  • Negoblle2Negoblle2 100 replies5 threads Junior Member
    The University of Wyoming has an architectural engineering program, it wouldn't hurt to check it out?

    UW Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering
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  • SannaBeeSannaBee 6 replies0 threads New Member
    It's a tough time out there for those seeking work in anything touching the housing market. My D is also a split-brain math science wiz and very artistic. I agree with the parent who suggested leaning toward product design or industrial design and engineering. That is a very cool way to incorporate both sides, while not facing what could be a really tough job market even 4-6 years from now. And to csleslie51, WOW Catapult Design is so amazing and I will be sharing their website with my D. Right up her alley! Another area to consider is Biomimicry. Combine Biology, Design and Engineering. Here's a link to several Biomimicry programs: Biomimicry Institute - Biomimicry Affiliate Program
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  • csleslie51csleslie51 1068 replies104 threads Senior Member
    SannaBee - Went to a talk given by Heather Fleming, CEO of Catapult. She has a BS degree and is a lecturer at Stanford. One of the most amazing and inspiring women I have heard in a long time.
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  • LakemomLakemom 2943 replies68 threads Senior Member
    I want to point out that for those engineering types interested in industrial design that the majority of ID programs do not have engineering type classes in them. Stanford's program is unique because you do 3 yrs in Mech Eng and 1 in Product design. RPI has a double major that has both. You can minor in design at CMU with a ME major. VT has a minor in ID. Drexel does. I believe Georgia Tech does as well. Most ID programs barely require one semester of physics or calc in other schools.

    There are 60 accredited ID programs in the U.S. and 20 are at art schools. Of those 40 left, some are at tech type schools. ID is more of an art major unlike Arch which has engineering classes incorporated. The focus of ID is more the psych, marketing and aesthetics of a product--not how to make it work well.

    My son is also a split person so I have done a lot of research. There are masters programs in ID/product design but they need to be researched because some are really engineering oriented, not art oriented, so focus on the actual manufacturing of the product, not how to design a better one.
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  • 2boysima2boysima 1737 replies57 threads Senior Member
    Architectural design is in the School of Engineering at Stanford. One of it's more well known students is Stanford QB Andrew Luck.
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  • 1moremom1moremom 3871 replies96 threads Senior Member
    I'll weigh in as the parent of an architectural engineering student at PSU. He also visited CU-Boulder, IIT and Drexel. He chose PSU because he felt there was more respect and collaboration between the engineering and architecture programs there. He has chosen the lighten design option which is generally considered the most creative and has a summer internship this year with a small firm that specializes in theatre design and lighting. Last summer he did a study abroad in Rome which will earn him a minor in architectural studies. He has been working very hard, but seems happy with his choice. I heard that job placement for the department last year was 97%.

    RISD offers a program in industrial design.
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  • soozievtsoozievt ! 31621 replies375 threads Senior Member
    2boysima wrote:
    Architectural design is in the School of Engineering at Stanford.

    Good suggestion and this is true. I just want to clarify for others, however, that this program is a BS in Engineering degree with a concentration in Architectural Design. My daughter was accepted this year to Stanford's MS program in Sustainable Design and Construction which is also in the Civil Engineering Dept., as is the BS program. There is no architecture school at Stanford.

    This undergraduate major grants a degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering with a specialization in Architectural Design. This engineering major is not an ABET accredited engineering degree, nor is it designed to lead directly to professional licensure in architecture. In order to become a professional architect or engineer, additional graduate training is required.

    Architectural Design Program
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  • MomfromKCMomfromKC 376 replies2 threads Member
    Since when did having a balanced skill set become split brain? Whatever happened to well rounded?
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  • ExieMITAlumExieMITAlum . 2341 replies26 threads Senior Member
    I did them as separate degrees at MIT. At the time (probably still true) I was allowed two advisors who worked together to coordinate my coursework so I didn't duplicate territory. It was their suggestions since I was bouncing between the two departments trying to figure out which one I liked better.

    The alliance helped me navigate course requirements. For instance: structures class in architecture didn't fulfill the requirement for the civil engineering degree, but the civil engineering structures class would count for both degrees. etc. Getting two separate degrees also required accumulating an extra year of credit but at MIT that is easily doable, especially if you take a full credit course during IAP (January). I used that time to study additional foreign languages (German, Spanish) for example.

    So - find a school that is flexible. Why try to mash them together if you can do both?
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  • keewartkeewart 14 replies1 threads New Member
    "I transfered to Construction Management ..."

    We heard in the engineering information session that Virginia Tech has a newer major in their engineering department: Construction Managment. There is a need for this. My husband gradutated in architecture at Virginia Tech but is doing more 'contruction management' now after 30 years. He said he wished they had that major then!
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  • grammarstudgrammarstud 9 replies3 threads New Member
    I'm in the exact same position! Currently a HS sophomore, but already torn as to which path to take.
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  • bobtheboybobtheboy 2132 replies84 threads Senior Member
    Civil engineering?
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  • mathteachermathteacher 22 replies1 threads New Member
    The problem with majoring in either engineering or architecture is you're on a railroad track curriculum from day one, probably at a large school with large classes. You don't get to sample other realms of thought until your junior and senior year. And if then you discover something that turns you on more than engineering or architecture, you can't switch majors and take all your courses in time to graduate.

    I have a former student who as a high school senior posed a similar question: art, or engineering? With my nudging, he decided that architecture encompassed some of each. I suggested he first get a liberal arts education in order to (1) to understand the social, historical, environmental, and political contexts within which he would be practicing, and (2) be sure that's what he wants to do. Then he could go for a masters in architecture.

    That's exactly what he's doing. He went on a fall visit to Bates College, loved it, was admitted, and graduates in a couple of weeks. While there he became a student "ambassador" for the college, made all kinds of valuable contacts, and spent a semester in St. Petersburg. He wouldn't trade the last 4 years for anything.

    And now it's on to architecture school!
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  • 1moremom1moremom 3871 replies96 threads Senior Member
    I would say it is more typical for students to be exposed to liberal arts opportunities in the first two years, when they are fulfilling their general ed requirements. At S's school students are not accepted into their majors until their junior year and then they begin taking those classes. And while the liberal education you mention is wonderful, many do not have the financial means to follow that type of path. They can't afford six or more years of school and they often need gainful employment as soon as they've earned a bachelor's degree so they can pay back the loans they did take. (My son the architectural engineering major will graduate with a minor in architectural studies, so it is possible to have it both ways to some extent.)
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  • NewerfuNewerfu 1 replies0 threads New Member
    thx for post.this forum has always come very interesting discussions ... I hope this will continue
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