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Architecture vs Engineering - or both?

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Replies to: Architecture vs Engineering - or both?

  • rick12rick12 636 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 642 Member
    rfelan, I am pretty far along in my career. How tough is it t get a job? It was pretty tough last year. I was chatting with the Dean of a southern school this week and he said he had seen statistics that a shade over 50% of last years graduates had found jobs in the profession. Most of us feel that it should start getting better, but it may be a slow climb back. On the plus side there are a huge number of architects in the profession that are 55 to 65 and they are going to start heading for the exit in the next ten years, so there are going to be some big voids that need to be filled.

    rick
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  • sansom14sansom14 8 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 8 New Member
    Cal Poly-SLO is a TOP Architecture School and has five areas of study. I think you are looking for an Architectural Engineering major. They also offer Landscape, Urban Planning, and Construction Management, and of course Architecture (my daughter's major).
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  • higgins2013higgins2013 702 replies25 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 727 Member
    Recent stats show that architecture majors have the highest unemployment rate (15%) of all undergraduate major categories for recent college grads. Architects' employment security is never truly secure. Layoffs can occur for architects at any stage of their career, and finding the replacement job can also be difficult at any stage, depending on state of economy (nationally and locally). If your architectural professors discuss issues in professional practice, pay close attention.

    Most double majors (architecture + structural/architectural engineering) eventually find themselves working as structural engineers rather than as architects. I don't know anyone who now practices as an architect.
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  • bayareafamilybayareafamily 2 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3 New Member
    My son is a HS junior trying to figure out where to apply. In terms of interest, he is very much like the students described here. What BA/BS programs offer freshmen and/or sophomores opportunities in architecture/design and engineering, so that they can figure out what what they like before declaring a major? We've taken note of the posts but would love a list of 8-10 schools to investigate. His first-round SATs were 2130, GPA currently 3.9.
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  • bungalowdwellerbungalowdweller 155 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 158 Junior Member
    Great discussion. Great information!
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  • LehighGradLehighGrad 1 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1 New Member
    I am a Lehigh University graduate with a degree in architecture. There are a few things I would like to share.

    First, you do NOT need to go back for a master's to get licensed as an architect in many states. Go to the NCARB website, which has a very good database of the registration requirements of each state. Many states allow experience in lieu of education. In my case, the choices were to get a Masters (two years of study) and be able to be licensed after two years of workt, OR I would have to work for four years. As such, it was four more years either way you look at it (but a lot cheaper) to not get the masters. Granted, a masters degree is a very good thing to have and in competitive markets like the one we are in now, many companies make a professional degree a prerequisite to an interview.

    The second part of all this is reciprocity, being able to get your license in another state after you get one in your first state. It will be a LOT easier to get a license in a different state if you have an NAAB accredited degree (ie Bachelor of Architecture, or Master of Architecture from an accredited program), however it is entirely up to the jurisdiction, and most simply say that if the state in which you have a license has standards that mirror their own, then you qualify. I would urge anyone thinking about architecture to spend a good amount of time at NCARBs website. It is confusing but you will eventually understand it all. At the end of the day, there is no single body which governs architectural licensure, as it is totally dependent on each state.

    As to degrees....Lehigh has a very good architecture program, and part of me wishes I had done their dual degree program which is five years and you leave with an engineering degree and an architecture degree. It is definitely worth considering and it makes you that much more versatile both in ability and potential employment. It is the only school I know of that offers such a program.

    Plus, we did just beat Duke in the NCAA tournament. :)

    Good luck to you all.
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  • lalipa12lalipa12 1 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1 New Member
    Hi All
    Can some expert advise me to find Arch is better than civil. I im in IInd year of a 5yr degree course of B Arch and my parent wants me to change it to civil coz of job and money ...i m not good at maths and physics, my interest not at all but building designs. I am also worried if people (employers) no understand what arch exactly is then it would be difficult for me to get job and make money...also i came to know from this forum that after some good work of say 10yrs people come to know abt me and my work...till 10yrs i have to struggle..some thing not getting digested....what abt B Tech Civil+M tech Structural design. I have this plan B at the moment.
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  • rick12rick12 636 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 642 Member
    As a parent I can respect your parents concern, but they are not going to live your life, this is a decision you have to make. What do you want to do the rest of your life. Engineering is a great major, but if you are not good at math and physics I don't think it is going to be much fun for you.

    Talk to your parents, tell them things will get better in the profession and you need their support to follow your passion. Here is a link to a blog that a friend of mine publishes. This is an article about the top ten reasons to become an architect;

    Top Ten Reasons to be an Architect | Life of an Architect

    Good luck,
    rick
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  • bungalowdwellerbungalowdweller 155 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 158 Junior Member
    Great answer, Rick! My girl was trying to decide between aerospace engineering and architecture. She had made an online friendship on a Star Trek fan site with an engineer at NASA. He told her that as far as he was concerned, she had to LOVE, love, love math to be a talented aerospace engineer. My girl is very good in math but didn't feel the same way about math as she did about designing things. She also wants to work for herself one day. She concluded that for her, architecture offered the most satisfaction. She's starting this fall.

    lilipa12
    EVERY profession is suffering right now. You have another 3 years for the economy to turn around---don't worry about it. And it's YOUR life!
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  • GreenappGreenapp 23 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26 New Member
    You should do engineering then. Most engineering schools require students to take design classes so you will be able to fulfill both dreams.
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  • bungalowdwellerbungalowdweller 155 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 158 Junior Member
    I think the OP made up his mind months ago. . .
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  • aus1003aus1003 18 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 21 New Member
    penn state and UT Austin has arch enginerring
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  • TanushreeCharan4TanushreeCharan4 1 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1 New Member
    same here.. im stuck in the same situation.. ater a great deal of thought i have opted to do a bacelors in civil engineering from cept university, ahmedabad. but i plan to do a masters in architecture.. which would make a good package .. because with the technical knowledge of a civil engineer one also has the designing ability of the architect.. am i right in thinking so?
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  • ehairstoehairsto 2 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2 New Member
    I might be a bit late to the party here, but I literally made this page just so I could say this:

    Back in the day, when architecture was a big thing in the ancient world (you know: pyramids, ziggurats, the Colliseum, etc.), the architects used a certain method-language that helped them understand how their ideal constructions would sit and which form would be the strongest. This same technique is used by modern-day problem solvers who help in the design of structures, products, machines, etc. in order to optimize the object's potential.

    That method-language is actually known as the universal science of "mathematics".

    (Yeah, long way to put it. Thought I'd be creative.)

    While architects are the artists and engineers are the scientists, both have to use mathematics in order to fully understand anything that their working on.

    The best architects were actually mathematicians. One big example: Pythagoras. 'Nuff said.

    That is why, in my opinion, when in doubt, look into a dual in architecture and mathematics. Maybe even a physics minor for the heck of it-- I mean it's applied math and extra stuff to make sure your castle doesn't fall over.

    By the way, friend, I'm an engineering major....for now, that is. ;) Hope I helped.
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  • ehairstoehairsto 2 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2 New Member
    By the way, for all that are reading this:

    How in the world does one keep their motivation?

    I mean we are all looking for a very well paying job (engineering), but some of us are looking for something that we can actually express ourselves in and be creative (architecture).

    Can you please give some ideas as to what will motivate someone who is worried about the future after college??

    (Hopefully thecheeseitman will benefit from this too if he is still looking for answers, or anyone else for that matter.)
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