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Would Princeton Admit All Five Applicants From My High School?

CCEdit_TorreyCCEdit_Torrey Editor Posts: 113 Editor
When multiple students from the same HS apply to the same college, are they competing just against each other? The Dean advises. https://www.collegeconfidential.com/articles/would-princeton-admit-all-five-applicants-from-my-high-school/
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Replies to: Would Princeton Admit All Five Applicants From My High School?

  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 8,738 Senior Member
    edited December 5
    Well, Princeton enrolled 34 from Lawrenceville over the last three years. Based on Princeton's typical yield figures, they may have accepted over 50.

    https://www.lawrenceville.org/page/academics/college-counseling
  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    There are still “feeder schools” that send atypically large numbers of seniors to certain Ivies each year, but even these figures are way down from what they were in eons past.
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 35,291 Senior Member
    They might admit all or none or some number between. What you can’t predict is which apps they will find compelling (so don’t try). :) It may surprise you who gets admitted from that pool. You can’t know everything in their apps - rec letters, ECs outside of school, ethnicity/family origin info, essay content, legacy status, etc. All you can do is put your best app together, then go on to focus on the rest of your list of schools (reach, match, safety) so you are sure to have choices in the spring.
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 2,240 Senior Member
    edited December 5
    The top private/boarding schools do send consistently high numbers of students to Ivies each year. The numbers are falling compared to 10 and even probably 20+ years ago. If you really look at year over year matriculation rates for many schools they are extremely consistent--consistency in a market with such variables suggests agreements.
  • TiggerDadTiggerDad Registered User Posts: 1,635 Senior Member
    Agree with Sally that even at the traditional feeder schools, the number of students being admitted to Ivies has been dwindling in recent decades as a result of the value placed on geographical, racial and SES diversity by these institutions. For non-feeder schools, it'd be extremely unlikely that all 5 get admitted. If these 5 applicants all have similar excellent academic stats, it really comes down to the individual unique achievements and traits that'd make a difference -- if at all.

  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 38,402 Super Moderator
    edited December 5
    Well, Princeton enrolled 34 from Lawrenceville over the last three years. Based on Princeton's typical yield figures, they may have accepted over 50.
    Even at the feeder schools, it's unlikely that Princeton accepted everyone who applied, though.Yes, the acceptance rate is probably well above the average, but I doubt there are many cases where a highly selective college has accepted every applicant from a particular HS. But since we aren't AOs, and since we have not seen the 5 applications, none uf us can sat definitively.
  • makemesmartmakemesmart Registered User Posts: 845 Member
    But for the vast majority HSs, isn’t it true (to a large extent), that you are competing with your fellow classmates for the same highly selective colleges?
  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 Registered User Posts: 3,349 Senior Member
    ^ It depends. For example, at Cornell, students apply to specific colleges. An engineering student is not going to be competing with a Hotel student. That said, if everyone from the same high school is applying to the same college, then it would be less likely that they would all be accepted (at least in my experience).
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 38,402 Super Moderator
    But for the vast majority HSs, isn’t it true (to a large extent), that you are competing with your fellow classmates for the same highly selective colleges?
    Only in the sense that all the applicants from the same HS are on a level playing field in terms of course offerings, school ECs, etc. But the reality is that not all of them will avail themselves to those resources or have the same stats. So I agree with @Sally_Rubenstone that the fact that all are from the same HS is not a deal-breaker all other things being equal, but all other things are never equal.
  • makemesmartmakemesmart Registered User Posts: 845 Member
    @skieurope @momofsenior1
    I agree and see your points, but if the premise of diversity of geography were true, then for the majority of HSs, highly selective colleges just could not, mathematically speaking, accept more than two students from a giving hs, (in fact under most situations none from a given HS, which is why students from the same region are competing with each other for highly selective colleges too), regardless of major/strengths. No?
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 35,291 Senior Member
    Dartmouth accepted 2 students from a class of 50 at my kid’s HS - the only 2 who applied. This attempt to read the tea leaves is futile. Do your best app, have a solid list, and keep moving.
  • TiggerDadTiggerDad Registered User Posts: 1,635 Senior Member
    edited December 5
    I'm not sure that "the vast majority HSs" even has in reality enough qualifying applicants to vie for "the same highly selective colleges." Perhaps there are enough academically qualifying applicants, but that's not enough without non-academic excellence or unique quality to go with it to be truly "qualifying."

    At my S's high school, there's always been several "academically qualifying" students each year but among them only one gets selected by Princeton about every other year on average. The reality that academic excellence alone isn't enough explains why the kid who graduated 6th in his class gets to walk through the Princeton's FitzRandolph Gate while the kid who graduated valedictorian gets admitted to none of these highly selective colleges. We see that all the time nowadays. This is why the student who posed the original question regarding competing against other applicants at the same HS needs to stop worrying about others. There's really no competing with one another; the competition is with one's own self.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 38,402 Super Moderator
    edited December 5
    if the premise of diversity of geography were true
    I never agreed to that premise.

    I will agree that Princeton wants to select as strong a class as possible and that they want diversity. But I do not believe, at least for domestic applicants, that there is a mathematical formula in place for geography.

    Here's the reality - Princeton will offer acceptances to approx 1950 applicants. There are 37K high schools in the US, so most of them will have zero acceptances.
  • TiggerDadTiggerDad Registered User Posts: 1,635 Senior Member
    edited December 5
    For the Class of 2022 at Princeton, there were 0 students admitted from the state of WY, SD, ND and MS. So, echoing @skieurope's point, there's no mathematical formula in geographic consideration in admissions.
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 8,738 Senior Member
    Re #14, while Princeton enrolled no students from those states, I've not seen information regarding acceptances from those states.
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