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RD Sway Chicago?

reyzarreyzar Registered User Posts: 18 Junior Member
How much RD sway do coaches have, specifically at UChicago? I contacted this coach a week after an EA deferral, with an update on stats & grades, and I know my stats would allow me to compete at Chicago's DIII level. The thing is, I'm interested in being a track recruit, so I don't know if its too late at this point for him to make any significant impact on admissions, since applications are due tomorrow, 1/5. I know it was my fault for not contacting him earlier, but I want to know if theres anything that can be done at this point.

Replies to: RD Sway Chicago?

  • reyzarreyzar Registered User Posts: 18 Junior Member
    bump.
  • reyzarreyzar Registered User Posts: 18 Junior Member
    No need to answer the question, just tell me if theres anything that can be done at this point LOL.
  • stemitstemit Registered User Posts: 575 Member
    When did you decide that running track in college was your overriding passion?

    Or, are you looking for that elusive advantage over other applicants?
  • fenwayparkfenwaypark Registered User Posts: 696 Member
    Just one data point here.

    If you contact the coach, the response would be something along the lines of, "If you are admitted, we would be happy to welcome you to try out for the squad."
  • ThankYouforHelpThankYouforHelp Registered User Posts: 1,295 Senior Member
    Chicago's track coaching staff went through a bit of a transition this fall. My daughter was interested in going there, but didn't get much feedback and chose to go elsewhere.

    With that said, if your times are good enough, I suspect that the coach will do what he can even in the RD process - but only if you can convince him that Chicago is truly your first choice. That won't be easy to do. There's a reason that coaches want you to commit in ED or EA - they have no way to know if you are actually going to come if you wait until all of your RD letters come back. If you really want to go there and you are really a good prospect, be relentless - contact him again and again until he gets back to you. What do you have to lose?
  • fenwaysouthfenwaysouth Registered User Posts: 988 Member
    ThankYouforHelp said....
    If you really want to go there and you are really a good prospect, be relentless - contact him again and again until he gets back to you. What do you have to lose?

    Exactly.
  • stemitstemit Registered User Posts: 575 Member
    edited January 2015
    OP has two problems: 1) convincing the coach Chicago is his first choice and 2) convincing the coach that he will actually compete for the team.

    The first component will need to be explained.. (Though people are allowed to change their minds, unless there is a great story supporting the change, coach will be a bit cynical.)

    The second component (asking the coach to use whatever influence can be brought to bare) is a cliff which IMO cannot be climbed. Which athlete decides a day before the application deadline "gee, it's been my life goal to compete in college, I'd better begin the process to get recruited." One key element a coach tries to devine is "comittment." Comittment to showing up at practice In the cold, wet, heat, humidity; regardless of mood, regardless of class work, regardless if you have a starting slot or ride the bench; staying for meets and practice even if the rest of the student body is on vacation. All the coach has to make this judgment is his history with the recruit (and what can be gleaned through references - i.e., HS coaches). There is no sign of that in this case - so OP needs a narrative to close this gap.

    Fenway is absolutely correct. A coach will tell the applicant he looks forward to meeting him at the first organizational meetings - after matriculating. If the athlete truly wants to compete in college, that will be the time to show up and begin that drive.

    Coaches have seen recruits come and go; seen walk-ons succeed and recruits fail. OP will need to satisfy the coach's BS meter.
This discussion has been closed.