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Swim recruiting questions

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Replies to: Swim recruiting questions

  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,023 Senior Member
    Great news jmtabb. One good game or meet can really make a difference.
  • AcersaccharumAcersaccharum Registered User Posts: 233 Junior Member
    I recently posted on another swim thread that does not see a lot of action. I’m looking for other swim recruits and parents who would like to join the conversation or have some advice to offer. If you are also looking for camaraderie in this school/swim search, check here:

    https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/athletic-recruits/1986030-swim-recruit-info-p1.html
  • juliamarshall001juliamarshall001 Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
    Is it necessary to be trained from swim schools if I wish to introduce my daughter to a competitive swimming environment? How about taking private swim lessons at Houston?
  • makemesmartmakemesmart Registered User Posts: 1,040 Senior Member
    @juliamarshall001 how old is your D? We started with our local swim club at age 7 (which is pretty late comparing to most of his team mates, but I think there are benefits of not starting too early). Texas has pretty strong club swimming tradition in general, try to find a good club that is not too far from your home.
  • ASKMotherASKMother Registered User Posts: 156 Junior Member
    I have a son who just finished 1st year on Varsity but has plenty of time (Grad23; we can start varsity swim as a 7th grader) to think about all of this. However I'm following you conversation trying to be proactive if he decides it's for him. Is it just me or are Mens Swimming Teams few and far between?! Because football, basketball and baseball take up 3/4 of the 'athlete' spots?
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,023 Senior Member
    A few schools have dropped men's swimming in the last few years. N Dakota, Buffalo are two.
  • AcersaccharumAcersaccharum Registered User Posts: 233 Junior Member
    Most D3’s have men’s and women’s teams. In that case, school fit is the most important factor. Up through freshman year in high school, your son’s first priority should be good grades. Academic achievement will ensure those athletic opportunities are there if he decides he wants them.
  • ASKMotherASKMother Registered User Posts: 156 Junior Member
    Thanks! Academics are a priority in our house and he's actually already taken the ACT once for DukeTIP and is in all honors. Trying to decide whether to be in the IB program in high school (like his older sister) or go heavy APs but either way academics will be stressed. It's my understanding the D2/3 programs cannot give scholarships, correct?
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,023 Senior Member
    D2 programs can (and do) give athletic scholarships. D3 schools can give merit scholarships or financial aid, but not athletic scholarships.
  • planitplanit Registered User Posts: 161 Junior Member
    @ASKMother, have you checked collegeswimming.com? If you to their recruiting tab, you can search a multitude of college swim programs broken down by gender, location, division, etc. You also can see where swimmers from your state have committed over the last two or three years. You are correct that there are many fewer men's programs than women's; a lot of the mid-major D1 schools have completely dropped their men's programs, and it seems like a couple more are threatened or dropped every year. That said, we know plenty of men swimming in college, but many of them have had a harder time finding somewhere to land than their female swimming equivalents. I assume your son swims club as well as high school? He is very young to be projecting how how fast he will be, as boys mature so late, but you can probably get some idea of what it will take to be recruited by checking out the times on collegeswimming.
  • jmtabbjmtabb Registered User Posts: 207 Junior Member
    There are lots of teams - but fewer than women's teams, that’s for sure,

    Go ahead and buy the lifetime membership at Collegeswimming.com. It’s only $25 and will let you follow teams, compare how your sons stats measure up as he gets older.

    If looking for swimming scholarships, it’s also important to learn how they work. Swimming is a sport where the number of kids getting full scholarships is rare.
  • ASKMotherASKMother Registered User Posts: 156 Junior Member
    @planit and @jmtabb Thank you for your feedback! He swims on a year-round team and we have had several friends go on to swim in college but mostly at the DII and DIII level (Queens, Catawba, FIT and BSC mostly). As it stands I cannot see him being dedicated enough for a DI program especially considering they are the most competitive (although he dreams of swimming for Virginia!); he's still young. From a parent standpoint, I would like his goal to be earning a spot on a competitive team but in a strong academic environment.
  • jmtabbjmtabb Registered User Posts: 207 Junior Member
    There are plenty of top academic schools with DIII teams. Do a search for my user name and you’ll see schools suggested for my daughter who has DIII times but tippy top grades and test scores. MIT, Johns Hopkins, Tufts, Chicago, Carnegie Mellon are all DIII schools with strong academics. Ivy League is also DI, in general a bit faster than the DIII teams and of course the academics are there. But there is no money strictly for the sport at DIII schools. Or at the Ivy’s.

    You’ve mentioned completing first year of varsity as a 7th grader. Check your school/disrict’s athletic association for the eligibility rules - it’s my understanding that there are a maximum number of years to participate at the varsity level (4 or 5 max). You don’t have to swim for the high school to be recruited, but if that’s a priority for him it will be a consideration.

  • makemesmartmakemesmart Registered User Posts: 1,040 Senior Member
    @jmtabb
    AFAIK, for private schools there is no maximal number of years requirement for varsity sports, and I am assuming (hoping!) the the OP’s kid is in private school.
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