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Help me read the tea leaves

24

Replies to: Help me read the tea leaves

  • waverlywizzardwaverlywizzard 106 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 106 Junior Member
    edited April 25
    I think this is very positive actually. There are very few athletes that have the academic chops to be ivy recruits. And I sometimes hear from parents gunning for D1 that ivy sports are not high D1 athletic equivalent. So if the club coach is telling you he is not D1 athletically maybe he is not experienced enough to appreciate ivy placement might just be right for him. There are some private schools that are feeders to ivy athletics. It is possible that the ivy coach recognizes that added academic rigor at the private school. His school coach and or AD may have more insight into past recruits from your private school. Congrats and good luck!
    edited April 25
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  • cupugucupugu 50 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 51 Junior Member
    @waverlywizzard In this case, however, the club coach is also an Ivy League soccer coach (!) so presumably his club coach knows well that Ivy's are not lower D1. He should also be a very good judge as to whether the kid is a viable Ivy recruit for soccer.

    Also the kid plays DA which means he does not play high school soccer and does not have a high school soccer coach.
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  • cinnamon1212cinnamon1212 222 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 224 Junior Member
    @cupugu its a little more complicated than that. The assessment didn't come from the Ivy coach, for example; my son has a few different coaches as he is on 2 teams. He is not in the DA but does play DA level soccer. If I explained more you would be able to figure out who he is because the situation is fairly unique.

    I think whoever's said he is in a big pool for the ivy is right, but it isn't quite as encouraging as @waverlywizzard thinks (unfortunately!).

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  • GKUnionGKUnion 86 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 88 Junior Member
    He is not in the DA but does play DA level soccer.

    What exactly does this mean?

    Just to put you at ease, no one will be able to figure out who your son is from the sparse information you’ve provided. I don’t believe you’ve even indicated what part of the country you are in. I’m all for keeping our children anonymous.
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  • cinnamon1212cinnamon1212 222 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 224 Junior Member
    @GKUnion he plays for a club that invites the best prep school players to play. He is on 2 teams, at 2 age groups, both of which are ranked (not that it is accurate, I know, and not by Gotsoccer) in the top 100. They have played DA teams. They don't play in a league, but do go to major tournaments like the Players Cup and the Jeff Cup.
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  • GKUnionGKUnion 86 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 88 Junior Member
    @cinnamon1212 If your area and Preps are similar to ours, the school, and your son’s grades/scores, could be more of a determining factor for strong academic D3/Ivy schools than his soccer resume. Don’t get me wrong, he’ll need to perform on the field, but these type of institutions look for true student athletes.

    If your son is leaning more toward D3 your timeline is fine. If D1 is on the docket I would ramp things up considerably on your end. Several players from my son’s club committed to D1 schools during their junior year. My son has already attended multiple camps as a freshman and most coaches made it clear they were already formulating their class of 2022 recruiting list.

    Good luck.
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  • cinnamon1212cinnamon1212 222 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 224 Junior Member
    @GKUnion thanks. Is the Ivy timeline the same as other D1s? If my son should be lucky enough to have the choice to play D1, my opinion is that I would rather have him play D3, *unless* the D1 is an Ivy. Unless things change a lot for him, other high academic D1s (Northwestern, Stanford etc) are not options.
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  • cinnamon1212cinnamon1212 222 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 224 Junior Member
    @Ohiodad51 thank you! That was what I was thinking too, but since I haven't been through this of course I don't know for sure.

    If my son was one of the top 10 recruits in his class I'm sure he could accelerate things, but sadly, he is not. I know for those kids the D1 coaches are reaching out to club coaches etc, but I don't believe any have in my son's case.

    That being said, some NESCAC coaches are in substantive conversations with my son, and the D1 I started the thread about replied to my son when he updated them after the email above. Reading the tea leaves -- I believe that indicates mild interest on their part, but not strong interest. Strong interest would have them reaching out to my son's club coach.
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  • AmBuddhaAmBuddha 22 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 22 Junior Member
    If I'm thinking of the right club you referred to earlier, your son can play soccer just fine. Where he ends up will likely be a function of a coach having a need for whatever he happens to bring to the pitch. There's an inherent randomness to that situation that I can share as a fellow impatient person who's probably more type A than is necessary. I have tried to remember that recruiting and player evaluation is terribly inefficient and challenging for all involved (not sure that helped my aura but I didn't stroke out so...).

    Ivy schools will be scouting/recruiting 10th and 11th graders now (spring season) and they're on the same overall timeline as other D1 schools as they're all competing for the same players.

    Back to your original post: it sounds like a perhaps customized email used to get ID campers. And that's all good. If the budget and time allows, he should go and see if he likes the coach, the school, the food, and being with other players who want to play college soccer. An Ivy coach emailed my son after a game last year inviting him to attend a camp. Apparently, every one of his teammates got one also, including the boys who hadn't made the trip. With coaches now having figured out mail-merge, everyone's email had their name in the salutation. The other team probably all got emails also! But every year at every school with a camp, some player ends up matriculating so it's just what happens.
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  • dadof4kidsdadof4kids 586 replies57 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 643 Member
    Different sport and different recruiting rules when S19 went through this, so ymmv.

    It sounds like we did something similar, emailing Ivies and similar schools. S got varied responses ranging from radio silence to something similar to your email. A couple of the schools that appeared to have extra interest in the emails (like what you described) but didn't contact his high school or club coaches were all over him on the first legal contact day, and he is headed to one of those schools in the fall. One that I thought was an athletic overreach when he first emailed them. Another that seemed really interested never did call him after the first legal contact day. But they recruited a couple stars for his position in the class ahead of him, which is why I think S went from being a highly sought recruit to being completely off of their radar.

    I would definitely give them the info they are asking for. I would also periodically email updates to them, and to the other schools he is interested in.

    It is difficult to predict who will ultimately be interested. As @Ohiodad51 pointed out, there is a pecking order. The top schools get their guys first, then the next tier, then the next, etc. So your S may move up on someone's board, or can move down, depending on what happens above him. I had a friend's son this year be told by a lower end D1 football program that he was the #5 linebacker on their list, and the 4 ahead of him were all guys they expected to go to P5 programs. But until those guys committed elsewhere he wouldn't be offered a scholarship.

    Early interest is also dependent a bit on recruiting budget and coach organization. S had a coach who had ignored all of his emails call and tell S out of the blue that S was one of their top priority prospects. This was 7 months into the legal contact period.
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  • cinnamon1212cinnamon1212 222 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 224 Junior Member
    edited April 30
    Wow @AmBuddha and @dadof4kids I can't thank you enough for your kind and encouraging words. I definitely appreciate any and all hand holding as a somewhat type A person who hates uncertainty as my son and I navigate this very uncertain process!

    I sensed that much of what the two of you wrote is true and it is good to get confirmation from someone who's been there and done that. It does take the pressure off a bit to realize that not *everything* is dependent on the athlete.

    Also, I expect things will become slightly less murky as with the new recruiting rules my son can be contacted in about 6 weeks' time. Either way will be great -- he/we will know where he stands a bit more. (Understanding that things can change due to the college coaches' needs changing etc).
    edited April 30
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  • GKUnionGKUnion 86 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 88 Junior Member
    @GKUnion thanks. Is the Ivy timeline the same as other D1s? If my son should be lucky enough to have the choice to play D1, my opinion is that I would rather have him play D3, *unless* the D1 is an Ivy. Unless things change a lot for him, other high academic D1s (Northwestern, Stanford etc) are not options.

    @cinnamon1212 I honestly can’t speak to the timeline of an Ivy vs. a typical D1 school.

    To your point, with the change in the recruiting rules I feel like the benefit to contact, early and often, with D1 coaches far outweighs the effort it takes. The way I look at it, we only have one shot to get this right and I’d hate to reflect back on the process in three years and be left with the impression we started too late. I liken it to retirement savings. If you start saving in your 40’s it’s difficult, if not impossible to catch up to someone that started in their 20’s.

    Cutting through the clutter and noise is difficult if you aren’t a top recruit. My son, in particular, will need to expend considerable effort off the field to get on the radars of schools that fit his financial/academic/athletic/social criteria. Once they show up to evaluate he’ll need to deliver between the lines. It’s a daunting process and we’re early in the journey. Hopefully the time he puts into the current outgoing communication will pay off when the incoming communication from coaches is allowed.

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  • AmBuddhaAmBuddha 22 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 22 Junior Member
    I'm reminded of a situation where a prestigious college thought they had a pipeline into a country with a stronger soccer tradition and expected at least a couple recruits. However, the pioneering player/student didn't like his time at college for whatever reason (the level of soccer was rubbish - kidding!) and that caused his brethren to reconsider. That left the coach scrambling a little late in cycle and he had to pick up some HS senior players he (and other coaches) had passed over. Worked out for that player but sometimes the late bird gets the worm? (This is all hearsay, though I have reason to believe the gist of the anecdote.)

    The cold hard "truth" is that if a player has desirable traits, schools will move heaven and earth to get him/her. Then everyone else has to wait for the dust to settle and it's a scramble all around. Sports in general is littered with examples of players being overlooked and discarded only to prove later on to be stellar. It's tough for a teenager to take, but as parents we have to rinse and repeat that message (as much as it pains us to watch.).
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  • AlwaysMovingAlwaysMoving 89 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 89 Junior Member
    We had an athlete on my kid's team that was recruited and accepted during regular decision to an ivy this year. It's not often, but it does happen.
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