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NCAA APR calculation for men's basketball

ProfessorPlum168ProfessorPlum168 4184 replies92 threads Senior Member
being the stats guy that I am, I still can't figure out how the APR calculation works exactly. On the NCAA website, it says that for each recruit that gets aid, you get one point for remaining on the team and one point for being eligible. Divide the number of points by total number of points possible, multiply by 1000, and that's your APR. Yet when I look at the University of Kentucky, which has multiple players leave every year for the NBA, their APR is 1000 every year for the last 4 years. What am I missing here?

Also, there is a threshold of 930, but it seems to me that if you have even 2 players leave for transfer purposes, you are under 930 (24 divided by (13 x 2)). What am I missing here?
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Replies to: NCAA APR calculation for men's basketball

  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 4919 replies86 threads Senior Member
    edited May 2019
    It's a four year average.

    Are you only including recruits who get athletic aid? DI Basketball is a headcount sport so only 13 guys max get athletic aid, no partials.

    Each scholarship player can earn two points per semester - one for staying in school, one for staying eligible. So if 10 scholarship players, there would be 40 points max for the year.

    NCAA allows APR adjustments---not good transparency with regard to this

    Players who have left who return for degrees (and no longer play their sport) positively impact APR (earn team points for being in school, even though they aren't on the team)
    edited May 2019
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  • ProfessorPlum168ProfessorPlum168 4184 replies92 threads Senior Member
    @Mwfan1921 I’m just trying to figure out how Kentucky can have a perfect score when they have 3 to 5 players leave every year. Actually doing the reverse math it seems like any other team that loses more than 1 player will get a big hit on the APR, such as Duke. I can see a small percentage of the players coming back to get their degree but not many.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 4919 replies86 threads Senior Member
    The players who leave to the nba just get replaced by new athletes who are enrolled and eligible, no? There is no apr penalty for losing a guy to the nba. Transfers to another school do lose a point, but if the player’s GPA was at least 2.6, the original team can get that point back thru the NCAA adjustment process.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 4919 replies86 threads Senior Member
    I think these are the most recent adjustment rules. http://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/2018_19 COA Policies and Procedures.pdf

    Leaving for the NBA does lose a retention point, but the school can get that back via the adjustment process, same as for transfers >2.6 GPA.
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