right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Join us for a LIVE webinar Friday, April 3 at 3pm ET to hear from admission officers on how COVID-19 is impacting admissions at schools. REGISTER NOW and let us know what questions you have and want answered.
Check out our newest addition to the Student Lounge. Go to the "STUDENT HERE: Ask Me Anything!" and connect with fellow students who can answer your school specific questions!
Cooper Union is rumored to release decisions today (4/1). Share your outcome!

D2 or 3/NAIA football with Tuition Exchange?

2plustrio2plustrio 168 replies4 threads Junior Member
Son will be entering his sophomore year this fall. He would love to play football in college but the true focus is academics. Grades are high solid as are other EC's. He's in choir, band, ski racing and track and even performs in the school musicals.

We live in the midwest and our son is thinking of heading out west or down south which means recruiting is off the table and hes basically going to have to do a lot of leg work himself so I am trying to be realistic and prepared.

His high school team is #1 in the state and is nationally ranked. He's been a starter since he began playing football in first grade. He's a solid player and very team oriented. Our players typically get recruited by Big 10 or smaller area D2/3 and our coach is highly respected and well versed at the midwest football scene.

But as I said, my son wants a "different climate". And while highly competitive, he does qualify for tuition exchange application as I work for a university. As he progresses through high school, we will be making hudl tapes and such along with creating positive social media for him to connect to oos coaches of programs he has interest in.

Tuition exchange spots are highly competitive. He of course would need to make it into the school before making it onto the football team. Im not sure if having tuition exchange as a possibility would even help his options for the D3/NAIA schools? Thus does he even mention it when doing his own leg work?
5 replies
· Reply · Share

Replies to: D2 or 3/NAIA football with Tuition Exchange?

  • StPaulDadStPaulDad 549 replies2 threads Member
    edited February 11
    If he's talking to D3 schools the TE doesn't matter much since there's no athletic money to affect. NAIA might care more since it means they wouldn't need to offer your kid any scarce scholarship dollars.

    Larger picture should be about fit, especially if your son is concerned about more than just FB. A lot of D2 and NAIA are not top tier academic schools, so if academics are important be prepared to dig a little to find places where he'll be as challenged in the classroom as at practice. D3 has far more good academic options, many of which play pretty good football. Geography and a sport are a good jumping off point, but he'll need to know what he wants and what his priorities are as he starts sifting through the options. How academic is he considering? Does he need an engineering or STEM program? Frats, religious, and all the normal factors need to be considered, so lots more questions like this.

    Then be realistic about his chances to play at a particular level. I assume he's well coached and knows his game and is not targeting D2 for a reason, but the better D3 programs can be really competitive: a 240 lb HS lineman is going to be a linebacker, unless he isn't fast enough and doesn't play.

    Go grab the lists of top programs in D3 and NAIA, maybe use the NCAA regional listings to pre-sort them geographically, and start eliminating places that don't make the mark for one reason or another. (Compare them to the TE list first, as this is a huge factor.) Go through the web sites of the schools that emerge and look at their rosters, dig into the game stats to see who is playing, and this fall watch a lot of games on the internet to see the real level of play. Are you big enough? Fast enough? The other consideration for your son is whether he wants to win (Good Program) or play (Not THAT Good) which can be a hard choice for kids that have started their entire lives. Good luck.
    edited February 11
    · Reply · Share
  • 2plustrio2plustrio 168 replies4 threads Junior Member
    Thanks for the input.
    He would be open to any divisions really. We do have players from our school that end up on division 1 teams but my son knows that he isnt a huge star and that its unlikely so even he is more realistic.
    I agree that he will need to decide whether he wants to be part of a "good" team or "play". He's lost so few games in his football career that it is something he needs to consider. I will encourage him to start watching online games and lower division football stats.
    You mirror my thoughts with the academic side. He loves football but it wont pay the bills. My thought with the TE was potentially guiding him to look at some of those schools with football programs. As most of them are D2/3/NAIA, I was curious if the possibility of him getting some tuition exchange money for academics would make him more or less of a possible football recruit.


    · Reply · Share
  • WindyChimesWindyChimes 7 replies1 threads New Member
    2plustrio wrote: »
    Son will be entering his sophomore year this fall. He would love to play football in college but the true focus is academics. Grades are high solid as are other EC's. He's in choir, band, ski racing and track and even performs in the school musicals.

    We live in the midwest and our son is thinking of heading out west or down south which means recruiting is off the table and hes basically going to have to do a lot of leg work himself so I am trying to be realistic and prepared.

    His high school team is #1 in the state and is nationally ranked. He's been a starter since he began playing football in first grade. He's a solid player and very team oriented. Our players typically get recruited by Big 10 or smaller area D2/3 and our coach is highly respected and well versed at the midwest football scene.

    But as I said, my son wants a "different climate". And while highly competitive, he does qualify for tuition exchange application as I work for a university. As he progresses through high school, we will be making hudl tapes and such along with creating positive social media for him to connect to oos coaches of programs he has interest in.

    Tuition exchange spots are highly competitive. He of course would need to make it into the school before making it onto the football team. Im not sure if having tuition exchange as a possibility would even help his options for the D3/NAIA schools? Thus does he even mention it when doing his own leg work?

    Having strong academics gives a kid more options as a recruited athlete, so that's awesome he's so academically focused. How tall is he? Starting in youth or high school football doesn't mean a whole lot if they aren't the right size for college. My son has also been part of a winning high school program but the stars on his teams that aren't college size, did not play beyond high school despite being great players. It's just the sad reality of making it to that level.

    Anyway, I live in northern CA and my son just went through the recruiting process. We have some experience with the different levels and situations out here, so feel free to ask questions if you'd like. At this stage focusing on academics and being a great teammate, etc. are great things to do. He can also go to camps over the summer to check out schools and programs he's interested in and get to know coaches in person.
    · Reply · Share
  • 2plustrio2plustrio 168 replies4 threads Junior Member
    He's about 5'11 or 6ft (hes outgrown his jeans in length so Im guessing hes closer to 6 foot now). But hes only about 175 lbs right now. He seems tall and lanky not overly "beefy" so I understand he might not make the body physique test. Hes not quite 15 so theres room to grow. He compares himself size wise to one of our star players who at 6'1'' and 170 just signed with a D1 team. Mostly he has big dreams that likely wont pan out into anything. Im realistic and not naive to the fact that most kids, not even the good ones, play college football.

    Time to tell where he will end up but just trying to make sure hes on a good path. Track season starts in 2 weeks so he will be back in the gym 5 days a week.

    I could see him in Cali or maybe the pacific northwest. Its super early, he loves music as well. I prefer a college where he might get a tuition exchange "discount". But as I read on here, the more information you can get and the earlier you can get it is usually a good thing!
    · Reply · Share
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 24068 replies19 threads Senior Member
    The tuition exchange might not make him a better recruit, but it might give him more options at D2 and D3 schools. The coach at a D2 might only be able to offer him a half scholarship, so if he has 'his own' money, that might make it possible for him to accept at a school he otherwise wouldn't be able to afford. Football is a head count sport, so D1 football may not care if he has tuition exchange, but D2 and D3 coaches are happy to know that students can afford the school without having to have a job during the season, that their grades are good enough to get a merit scholarship, or that they have outside scholarships. Coaches want their athletes to be playing and studying and not struggling to pay the rent or eat.

    My daughter combined merit, athletic and state aid so that she didn't have to work during the school year.
    · Reply · Share
Sign In or Register to comment.

Recent Activity