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NESCAC Schools

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Replies to: NESCAC Schools

  • gointhruaphasegointhruaphase 572 replies3 threads Member
    In my experience, the objective of the GCs at the publics is to get the kids assigned to them into a college -- no unaccepted kids. Before the days of Naviance, ours circulated a redacted list of students, with rank and GPA, and the schools at which they were accepted. I tried to explain that the information was far less helpful than where the kids were rejected, all to no avail (i.e., if the valedictorian is accepted at Boise State, that doesn't mean that you have to be the valedictorian to get accepted at Boise State. By contrast, if the valedictorian is rejected by Cornell, that actually could be informative). I actually think the list was intended to reduce parental expectations.

    It's your kid that is going to college, not the GC. Keep a very long list of potential schools and an open mind. The right experience for your kid will emerge from it.
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  • politepersonpoliteperson 565 replies4 threads Member
    It’d be great if the GC can help out as suggested. It can sometimes be tough to educate GCs about the realities of athletic recruiting though, so as mentioned above you’ll need to filter the GCs advice through your own sense of what’s possible in terms of admission. And of course your GC might have zero experience with how athletes do at a particular school. That’s why I think the college coaches can be helpful (although sometimes they have their own biases and blind spots).
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  • LolliCoomassieLolliCoomassie 35 replies1 threads Junior Member
    I get what you are suggesting, @LolliCoomassie , but our hs GC knew nothing about the schools that my daughter was interested in and had NO idea which schools were an athletic match or if they even offered the sport (UF does, the other publics do not). The GC didn't even know much about the private schools academics and never made any suggestions to either of my kids about colleges, but just assume everyone will go to a public school.

    We had to do all the footwork ourselves. Really, the only help we got was from D's club coach.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Oh, I completely agree that GCs aren't any help with an ATHLETIC match! That's definitely outside their field of expertise. Your coaches are the best resource regarding athletics. (My previous post was about *academics*.)
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    @Determined27 , SInce your son's GC is unhelpful, is there somebody else at his school who understands his learning differences and knows the rigor of the coursework he has done in HS? I would think somebody at your school's learning center/special ed department would be a good resource. Surely they've seen their previous seniors heading off to college and might be able to steer your son in the right direction. It could be a NESCAC school, or perhaps NEWMAC or LIberty League...but the school with the right academic support would be more important than a specific DIII conference.

    Because your son isn't a typical learner, finding his specific academic fits seems to be of paramount importance. It would be heartbreaking for him to attend a school which has a fantastic football team but is unable to meet his academic needs. And if he loses his academic eligibility, then having a great team will no longer matter. That could just be devastating for your son.

    It's sad to hear that other families here haven't had knowledgeable GCs to help guide them. My kids attend a public high school, and they've received some terrific advice from their GCs on public & private academic matches. My son's good friend has a learning difference and he was worried he would struggle in college. His GC told him about a terrific small private school that would provide him with the type of support he specifically needed. He's a senior there and about to graduate with honors!







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  • Determined27Determined27 14 replies1 threads Junior Member
    Spoken to a few NESCAC schools and done extensive research. The concensus is that all of the schools have support programs , Tutors etc. So that is comforting I guess then next question comes will that be enough to handle the work load ?
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 6577 replies10 threads Senior Member
    @Determined27 -- you and your son will need to answer that for yourselves.

    When they say tutors, does that mean help sessions 2 or 3 times a week (which most in the class will attend in a challenging class) or do they mean 1 on 1 instruction in as many classes as you need. And how much will you need?

    It's really hard for all of us who don't know your kid to answer that. You know best what support he's needed for HS so the challenge will be to extrapolate.

    I sense that in courses that have problem sets (math, science, economics, etc), most of the kids at my kid's school take advantage of the additional resources that are made available to them because they need it.

    It will also depend on what he wants to study and how effectively he can manage the courses he takes to minimize those which don't play to his strengths.
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  • brantlybrantly 4228 replies75 threads Senior Member
    edited February 25
    I really don't get this. Why would a student set himself up for a situation in which he knows *in advance* that he will need extra support and tutoring? Accommodations, I get (extra time on tests, being alone in a testing room, testing only in the morning, bringing snacks, taking breaks, etc.). But what is so important about attending a school in the NESCAC athletic conference (or any particular conference) IF that a student would—in addition to attending classes, studying and completing assignments, and team practices, games, and events—have to be on academic support? Besides adding more appointments to his schedule, won't that be stressful?

    And my question isn't just about students with LDs, but any student who knows in advance that he/she will need academic support to succeed at a particular school. I have a friend whose son went to Yale. He's not really an academic superstar, but he had other talents that were attractive to Yale. He struggled a bit academically. And his choice of majors was more limited because there was no way he could keep up with the coursework and keep up with his peers in the science major that was his original choice. This student has no LDs.
    edited February 25
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  • one1ofeachone1ofeach 896 replies17 threads Member
    At Williams - 3 hrs home work per class meeting. Seems like a lot and more than I did in college...
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 4927 replies86 threads Senior Member
    Spoken to a few NESCAC schools and done extensive research. The concensus is that all of the schools have support programs , Tutors etc. So that is comforting I guess then next question comes will that be enough to handle the work load ?

    I think you should consider speaking with a private educational counselor who specializes in students with LDs. You can find lists of qualified consultants on IECA, HECA or NACAC sites.
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 6577 replies10 threads Senior Member
    It sounds like one of the challenges here is that the OP's kid is highly desirable as a recruit. This makes it less likely that a coach will say "yeah, you're going to struggle here in the classroom " (if that is the case - this kid sounds like he's very disciplined and has done a good job of figuring out how to manage.)

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