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Applying ED or RD

unicornrainbowunicornrainbow Registered User Posts: 108 Junior Member
edited August 2012 in Brown University
Hi! I'm thinking of applying to Brown but I'm not sure if I should do ED or RD. My dad got his PhD at Brown. Does that make me a legacy? If so, would it help me if I apply ED? Thank you very much!
Post edited by unicornrainbow on
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Replies to: Applying ED or RD

  • bruno14bruno14 Registered User Posts: 2,052 Senior Member
    That would make you a legacy, which may give you a (tiny) leg up in both ED and RD admission cycles. However, remember that ED is binding; only apply if you know for sure that Brown's your top choice school and that you will be able to attend if admitted (you can pay).
  • WhartongradWhartongrad - Posts: 19 New Member
    Hello,

    As a legacy applicant applying ED would give you the best chances for admissions. It will show Brown that not only do you have a strong interest in the University, but also your family has strong ties to the institution. If your Essays are amazing and your grades and GPA in range, you should have a better chance of admissions than most.

    Hope this helps
    Kevin J
    Admissions Advice Online (dot) com
  • fatherofmfatherofm Registered User Posts: 332 Member
    whartongrad, is 2380 SAT1 and 3.5 gpa worth applying ed.
  • pixelspixels Registered User Posts: 446 Member
    Wow. Great SAT. Not so great GPA. Does your school rank? If your in the top 10% of your class, you may be okay, but if not, it might be trouble. Usually what this combination of SAT and GPA suggests is a smart student who is lazy in school and not working up to potential. Immediate red flag.

    Sent from my HTC VLE_U using CC
  • fatherofmfatherofm Registered User Posts: 332 Member
    thanks, pixels, she will be only top 15% in a high school not too long ago rated as top 55 now may be 120 or so in the nation. But the bigger question is not so much of getting into an IVY league school with those stats but surviving with those work habits. You are capable of 2380 but u can only do 3.5 work. That may not be enough.
  • unicornrainbowunicornrainbow Registered User Posts: 108 Junior Member
    Thanks so much. Is it really bad if I'm not in the top 10%? I don't know if I am yet because we don't find out until October. My GPA is 3.9. My school rounds to the tenths place, so anything between 3.85 and 3.94 would be a 3.9. But when calculating for the top 10% they round to the hundredths. One year the cutoff was 3.93 and someone with a 3.92 didn't make it. What are the SAT ranges for Brown? Is it true that as long as I fall into the mid 50% then it should be okay? Thank you so much!
  • pixelspixels Registered User Posts: 446 Member
    fatherofm - Top 15% isn't bad at all. It sounds like she goes to a tough school, and many times there is significant grade deflation. I know this because I go to a high school ranked in the top 5 in the nation for STEM and its quite difficult to maintain an extremely high GPA. So, yes, I would apply ED with those shots. She'd definitely have a shot, assuming non-academic criteria are great.
  • fatherofmfatherofm Registered User Posts: 332 Member
    after I posted I did do some research. It is #4 in our state and 80+ in nation. Maybe you are right there could be some grade deflation here.
  • fireandrainfireandrain Registered User Posts: 4,738 Senior Member
    This gives valuable info: Admission Facts | Undergraduate Admission

    unicornrainbow: I'm not sure that a PhD from Brown is considered legacy.
    Is it true that as long as I fall into the mid 50% then it should be okay?

    In a school that has an acceptance rate below 10%, no one is "okay" in admissions (unless their parents are celebrities or donate a lot of money). If your scores are mid-range, that means you are a competitive applicant. But your chance of getting accepted is still pretty low, because there are so many applicants and because Brown wants to accept the best. (Most applicants are qualified. Don't kid yourself and think that of the 30,000 applicants, most have 3.0 GPAs and 1700 SATs. They don't.)

    As for your high school's ranking -- I doubt that colleges pay much attention to that. Most admissions offices are familiar with high schools because they've been seeing applicants for many years. They also closely scrutinize your high school's profile, which will provide the info needed to put the applicant's stats in perspective. 98% of students who are ranked in the second decile get rejected.
  • fireandrainfireandrain Registered User Posts: 4,738 Senior Member
    I also want to address the ED vs. RD question.

    Many recruited athletes are in the ED pool. Their chance of acceptance is 100%. This means the ED acceptance rate is skewed. If you took away the recruited athletes, the ED acceptance rate drops.

    If Brown is your first choice, if you really really want to go there, and if you know that you can afford it, apply ED. If you need your senior year grades to boost your GPA or rank, or if you need to do more testing, then apply RD. Other than that, your GPA and test scores shouldn't be an issue in the decision between RD and ED.

    In other words, I really don't understand the point of the question, "is 2380 SAT1 and 3.5 gpa worth applying ed." If the 3.5 GPA will go up because of first semester senior year grades, I'd advocate applying RD. If not, then it really doesn't matter.
  • fatherofmfatherofm Registered User Posts: 332 Member
    does that mean 3.5 GPA and you are out in ED, if that is the case we will look elsewhere, why bother and in the end that is the CC expertise I am looking for.
  • unicornrainbowunicornrainbow Registered User Posts: 108 Junior Member
    Thank you. By "okay" I meant what you said. I just tend to oversimplify things when I explain them. :)
  • fireandrainfireandrain Registered User Posts: 4,738 Senior Member
    fatherofm, I still don't understand what you are asking. There are students with 3.5 GPAs who are accepted both ED and RD. Without seeing the transcript, without reading the application, without knowing anything about the high school, without knowing where you live, the ethnicity, ECs, recommendations, rank, etc., we can't advise you about applying ED. Even if we knew all of that, since we're not admissions officers we can't predict the result. All I can tell you is that a 3.5 alone is not an automatic rejection.

    I know that many applicants feel like they have one ED card and they want to play a game about where they should play it. Many CC experts advise that you don't use ED that way.
  • fatherofmfatherofm Registered User Posts: 332 Member
    fireandrain you ave been very helpful, infact quite insightful. I don't think your comment abo about ED is right. Think about it this way, in the realm of whole college application process which everybody agrees is arbitrary, the only arsenal a candidate has is ED, Of course other than his/her STATS.
  • fireandrainfireandrain Registered User Posts: 4,738 Senior Member
    fatherofm, many CC regulars would tell you that the ED is there for the colleges' benefit, and not the applicant. The applicant is much better off having multiple acceptances and financial aid packages to compare. The colleges have the upper hand, not the applicant, in ED.

    If financial aid is not an issue, if the student has a clear first choice, if his/her stats as of Nov. 1 are excellent, then ED is a good option.
This discussion has been closed.