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Business Administration or Human Resourcing?

2ne1islife2ne1islife Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
I was wondering which of the majors would be better? I was also wondering if a business administration degree is considered as a "bs" major like psychology for the medical side? Or is it like a legit major that companies will look at during interviews/hiring? I stuck in between an operation manager or a human resource manager for a company? Is one more stressful and difficult than the other? Or are they practically the same thing?

Replies to: Business Administration or Human Resourcing?

  • 2ne1islife2ne1islife Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    Also which has the better chance of employment?
  • NoteworthyNoteworthy Registered User Posts: 244 Junior Member
    I was wondering which of the majors would be better?
    Business Administration is a type of degree opposed to a major. Examples would be like a Bachelors of Business Administration in Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, etc. Furthermore, better in what regard?
    I was also wondering if a business administration degree is considered as a "bs" major like psychology for the medical side?
    Typically a B.B.A is 50% general education courses, 25% general business courses, and 25% your specific business major courses. While a B.S. is typically 50% general education courses and 50% specific major courses.
    Or is it like a legit major that companies will look at during interviews/hiring?
    It's a legit major that companies look at during interviews, generally most business majors require somewhat of a background in other fields to be effective is why they are done this way.
    I stuck in between an operation manager or a human resource manager for a company?
    You aren't "stuck" anywhere in business. That's just where you will start. That's one of the benefits of being in the business field is that the more experience you get, the easier it is to switch between specific business areas.
    Is one more stressful and difficult than the other?
    Can't answer cause it varies from school to school and person to person. Generally though a BBA in finance, accounting, or economics are considered to be more difficult.
    Or are they practically the same thing?
    Not really because a BBA is typically done through a business school while human resourcing is usually done through a social science school.
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 11,621 Senior Member
    Not really because a BBA is typically done through a business school while human resourcing is usually done through a social science school.

    No, human resources management is a business school major. You will not find it in a social sciences department.
  • NoteworthyNoteworthy Registered User Posts: 244 Junior Member
    No, human resources management is a business school major. You will not find it in a social sciences department.
    Sorry I didn't realize OP was implying HR management. I thought they just meant HR in general.
  • NovaLynnxNovaLynnx Registered User Posts: 1,406 Senior Member
    You could do operations or HR with either degree, if the school offers HR as a separate major. Most schools just offer it as a minor, or as a concentration within the business major. Many business/HR professionals also minor in psychology or major in related fields. I have a BA in psychology and I am working as an HR manager. I've personally never taken a business course. I started small, with an hourly HR office lead position at a retail store and worked my way up from there, although doing internships during my junior and senior year of college would have given me a better jump start in the field. Some schools do teach HR outside of business schools as well - Villanova University's MA in HR Development is primarily taught by psych professors.

    The key is pursuing good internships and building your resume with related work experience.

    As for what you do as an operations vs. HR manager, that varies widely by company. At some companies the operations manager will do scheduling, payroll, and many other HR tasks. At other companies the HR manager will oversee some operational tasks that are not traditionally HR related. And yet other companies will have very separate roles for ops and HR.

    Both positions can be stressful. Traditional ops managers run the backbone of the business, which can be a lot of pressure depending on the industry and their particular managers, whereas HR managers can destroy employee relations if they're not on top of their game. I find some days are stressful, such as when I receive serious employee complaints (they can be emotionally draining), or when several key employees quit in a short time frame (I don't care much for recruiting and interviewing all day long). But overall I find the work rewarding when I can help an employee through a difficult situation, develop employees and see them promoted, improve employee engagement, etc. I know ops managers who enjoy their work because they are detail-oriented, enjoy working with and analyzing numbers, or even enjoy the constant pressure.

    My recommendation would be to take a variety of courses and see what you like. Keep in mind that you can be an HR generalist (do a bit of everything), or specialize in an area you enjoy and become a recruiter, payroll specialist, benefits specialist, employee relations consultant, etc. Also, start internships early and experience a bit of both HR and ops. It is very different learning it in the classroom than actually doing it on a daily basis.
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