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"Want a Wall Street Job? Start Preparing Now"

betterday55betterday55 Registered User Posts: 1,465 Senior Member
edited May 2007 in Business Major
Very interesting
http://www.thestreet.com/funds/managerstoolbox/1122099.html


I'm suprised he said applicants should be noncreative. I've always thought businessmen need to be pretty creative.

Not caring? I found another WSJ saying that for a good CEO to be good, he/she has to be creative AND caring (to employees).

What's your opinion?
Post edited by betterday55 on
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Replies to: "Want a Wall Street Job? Start Preparing Now"

  • irishbluesirishblues Registered User Posts: 248 Junior Member
    Good for me.

    I have a question though. I have heard a lot of people saying that Math and Law degrees look better than a specialized degree (e.g. economics, finance, accounting ...). Is this true?

    I plan on double majoring in Math and either Finance or Economics. But would a law degree or a science/engineering degree be better?
  • aquamarineeaquamarinee Registered User Posts: 3,028 Senior Member
    I found it interesting that he stated that economics or business majors specialize too soon. They seem to recruit pretty heavily from these majors...
  • redhare317redhare317 Registered User Posts: 1,449 Senior Member
    Economics should NOT be considered a "specialized degree." It's actually more broad than you would think. A law degree is not necessary for Wall Street. Plus, it takes 3 more years.

    There is no advantage of engineering/science over math (esp. math + econ), unless you're applying for a technical position as an engineer of course.
  • betterday55betterday55 Registered User Posts: 1,465 Senior Member
    sooo.... what this guy's saying is not that credible?
  • aquamarineeaquamarinee Registered User Posts: 3,028 Senior Member
    Any other opinions?
  • irishbluesirishblues Registered User Posts: 248 Junior Member
    Do jobs still look at your SATs?
  • barronsbarrons Registered User Posts: 24,873 Senior Member
    What he was really saying is that if you went to an Ivy type school you need not major in business.
  • aquamarineeaquamarinee Registered User Posts: 3,028 Senior Member
    That actually makes me feel better. Somewhat. Atleast I can happily pursue both a science major and perhaps econ/business major now. I think... unless what the writer's saying isn't necessarily true.
  • tonerangertoneranger Registered User Posts: 3,723 Senior Member
    Most of what he writes is very true...
    I can confirm that Morgan Stanley does NOT look for compassionate or creative types for IB jobs. The individuals they like tend to be assertive, confident, quick, and VERY smart. Plus they thrive under pressure and don't mind long hours. Workaholic types are welcome. It's true that you don't need a business degree. What he's not quite clear about is the role of the target school. If you go to a target school (Ivy, MIT + Stanford), you really don't need to worry about your major. Those who go to non-targets have very little chance - they cherry pick and might take one or two per year from the big stage Us and publics. And those are pretty amazing kids...
    Regarding using SATs, I think some banks may do this. They also ask strange questions like " Why is a manhole cover round?"
    Some of this is to see if you can think on your feet - and it's also a test of how you respond to pressure.
    The interview process IS brutal - and so are the jobs. After a while, as an interviewer, you get a feel for who will do well and who will not. There's a profile. If you don't fit it, it's probably best that you didn't get the job.
  • Sheed30Sheed30 Registered User Posts: 12,425 Senior Member
    irishblues

    yes they sadly do...
  • aquamarineeaquamarinee Registered User Posts: 3,028 Senior Member
    That's pretty interesting. Any idea what their cut-off is? I wonder if their cut-off is like a 2300/2400, in which case I need to keep re-taking until I get that score (just kidding).
  • redhare317redhare317 Registered User Posts: 1,449 Senior Member
    Some consulting firms require that you put SAT scores on your resume. I don't know about IB.
  • Mr PayneMr Payne Registered User Posts: 8,850 Senior Member
    No new info found.
  • SweetLax88SweetLax88 Registered User Posts: 308 Member
    This is just one guy's opinion. IMO, a load of bullock (except the workaholic part).
  • foxdie!foxdie! Registered User Posts: 832 Member
    I think what he's saying is that finance/accounting/econ degrees won't give you as much of an advantage as you think. But for non-targets I would say it's VERY advisable to study something that is immeadiately applicable. They won't want to deal with a science major who knows nothing about fundamental finance concepts.
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