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NYU (Stern) vs. Cornell (CAS Economics)

imflyingimflying Registered User Posts: 23 New Member
edited May 2008 in Business Major
I've been accepted into both Stern and the college of arts & sciences at Cornell. At Stern I'd be able to major in finance and marketing, and I've heard it's very easy to get internships, and ultimately helps a lot in landing a Wall St. job. At Cornell I got into the Dean's Scholars Program, which has some academic perks like special seminars and the chance to apply for a research grant later on.
Cornell's also got much better overall name recognition than NYU.

I hope to get an MBA after working a couple of years (probably in finance or marketing), and according to US News Cornell was ranked #1 for undergrad business schools in placement for top MBA programs (NYU was ranked 20-something).

Should I choose Stern or Cornell CAS?
Post edited by imflying on

Replies to: NYU (Stern) vs. Cornell (CAS Economics)

  • kmzizzlekmzizzle Registered User Posts: 1,248 Senior Member
    Grats
    Well do you want to do finance or econ
  • naurunauru Registered User Posts: 1,158 Senior Member
    Finance and economics are very different fields. Both are solid programs, so make sure you know which discipline you are more interested in. If you're indifferent to the choice of finance or economics, that probably means you haven't done enough reading/research.
  • imflyingimflying Registered User Posts: 23 New Member
    Well, finance is probably more directly related to what I want to do immediately after college (for now, investment banking). But I also know that many econ majors are also able to go into that field (so while the classes may be different, econ and finance can lead to the same jobs).

    As far as personal preference, maybe I've a slight preference for finance at Stern, but if Cornell will give me better opportunities in the long run, ie grad school (MBA) and career, then I'm perfectly willing to do economics at Cornell.

    That was my main question- will Cornell have long-term advantages over Stern because of its name recognition and academics?
  • cbreezecbreeze Registered User Posts: 4,714 Senior Member
    There are a lot of Cornell graduates who are ibankers because Cornell is a target school. You may change your mind about your career in college and Cornell offers you that opportunity because overall the quality of its programs is much higher than NYU.
  • VectorWegaVectorWega Registered User Posts: 1,872 Senior Member
    I hope to get an MBA after working a couple of years (probably in finance or marketing), and according to US News Cornell was ranked #1 for undergrad business schools in placement for top MBA programs (NYU was ranked 20-something).

    This is a completely worthless stat and you should ignore it.
    You may change your mind about your career in college and Cornell offers you that opportunity because overall the quality of its programs is much higher than NYU.

    I don't get this. Are you talking about a complete career change out of business? Because, the NYU undergraduate business program is certainly ranked higher than that of Cornell.

    NYU also gives the added benefit of location which will be beneficial when you search for internships and fulltime environment. The only reason I wouldn't choose NYU is if you didn't like the culture or the competitive nature of the students.
  • cbreezecbreeze Registered User Posts: 4,714 Senior Member
    VictorWega wrote:
    don't get this. Are you talking about a complete career change out of business? Because, the NYU undergraduate business program is certainly ranked higher than that of Cornell.

    Yes.
    FYI, Cornell doesn't have a formal undergrad business program. It's called applied economics and management or CAS economics.
  • cbreezecbreeze Registered User Posts: 4,714 Senior Member
    When I said Cornell doesn't have a formal undergrad business program, I mean that the graduate business school, the Johnson School of Management which confers the MBA degree doesn't have an undergraduate program. The undergraduate business program is under the College of Agriculture and Sciences which is part of the SUNY school system.
  • imflyingimflying Registered User Posts: 23 New Member
    Okay, thanks guys. If anyone has more input, feel free to keep posting (although I'll have to make the big decision soon...)
  • GlueEaterGlueEater Registered User Posts: 1,002 Senior Member
    Wait I thought Cornell's undergrad business was AEM under CALS. Is it really under CAS?
  • VectorWegaVectorWega Registered User Posts: 1,872 Senior Member
    I'm not sure what was wrong with my comments. Cornell does have a business program.
  • TehRahkTehRahk Registered User Posts: 407 Member
    Yes there is an undergraduate business program. It's called Applied Economics and Management and it's in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences.
  • imflyingimflying Registered User Posts: 23 New Member
    Yes, Cornell does have a business program (Applied Econ&Management at the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, as tehrahk said). However, I applied and got into the College of Arts and Sciences, so I'll just be doing economics if I go (I can still take classes at the AEM business school).

    From what I've heard the opportunities for Cornell CAS Econ grads are very similar to Cornell AEM grads.

    The question is, Cornell or NYU Stern?
  • naurunauru Registered User Posts: 1,158 Senior Member
    From schools/programs of this calibre, econ majors are as capable as business majors at landing top jobs in S&T and IBD (if not more so due to their generally superior quant skills). So you should decide:

    a) What you'd rather study; and
    b) Where you'd rather study.

    Both are target schools so forget all the rankings/BS and pick your preference. In your case if you are unable to land a top job, it will be because of your own lack of ability/personality/preparation or a combination of these -- not because of the school/program you attended.
  • theoneotheoneo Registered User Posts: 6,934 Senior Member
    I see these as the major factors you should consider:
    -location advantages (easier access to internships/networking events in NYC)
    -theoretical, liberal arts vs. practical, vocational curriculum <-- big difference
    -how set you are on business/how many electives you want to take
    -non-academic factors (e.g. campus vs. no campus, rural vs. urban, expenses, etc)
  • denneykdenneyk Registered User Posts: 290 Junior Member
    does anyone have list of top undergrad landing placement into grad programs?
This discussion has been closed.