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2nd Major in addition to BBA? Recommendations?

ccer123ccer123 Registered User Posts: 25 New Member
edited April 2009 in Business Major
I have room to get another major in addition to a BBA. Any suggestions what this should be?

I am interested in consulting for the first two years post-graduation, and then going into something else. I am also interested in working in Asia.

I would like something that could give me many options...thanks!
Post edited by ccer123 on
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Replies to: 2nd Major in addition to BBA? Recommendations?

  • steeveesteevee Registered User Posts: 828 Member
    How do you major in BBA? Don't you choose majors like accounting, finance, management, marketing, etc?
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell User Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 2,294 Senior Member
    I think steevee is getting to this, but a quantitative major that backs up your BBA focus would be a nice addition. For example, marketing and psychology, finance and economics, operations management and industrial engineering, etc. Then you'll have the well-rounded business education to frame problems in a business context and a focused methodological tool belt from which to create solutions.
  • creamgethamoneycreamgethamoney Registered User Posts: 589 Member
    ^seconded. Applied math or statistics would be a great second major, especially if you're like me and don't enjoy computer programming (ruling out basically any engineering). Math is the only universal language, and can be applied nearly anywhere, so knowing this will make you a valuable member of any corporation.

    Otherwise, a minor or something in a good foreign language like german, french, mandarin could be helpful as well since the world is also becoming more global...
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell User Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 2,294 Senior Member
    if you're like me and don't enjoy computer programming (ruling out basically any engineering).

    ? I have degrees in three types of engineering and have never programmed a day in my life.
  • creamgethamoneycreamgethamoney Registered User Posts: 589 Member
    well at least at my school, the engineers all have to take SOME form of programming, be it matlab, etc., which I would rather not deal with. It varies school by school, but I'd agree that you won't necessarily be programming as an engineer, although I think programming is becoming more prevalent nowadays.
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell User Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 2,294 Senior Member
    Matlab isn't programming. Obviously, I had to learn to model in Matlab.

    But unless you're EE or CompE, you won't have to worry about C++, Java, etc. unless you want to learn them (though they can be helpful).
  • JapherJapher Registered User Posts: 1,349 Senior Member
    I had to take one FORTRAN class for my engineering degree.
    I have never used it, or any other programming language for that matter.

    OP, I think psychology is a great compliment to any major and wish I had taken more psych classes. I think other degrees like organizational behavior, statistics, operations management, and operations research are all likewise useful.
  • GoIlliniGoIllini Registered User Posts: 348 Member
    I don't think a psychology undergrad is really going to help you
  • chickenfootchickenfoot Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Our school just had Career Day last week, and almost all the spokespeople emphasized the need to develop good communication skills in the workforce. They quoted that technical skills can only get you so far; if you want to further your career in a managerial position, soft skills are a must. One guy even went to say that minoring or taking courses in subjects such as history, English, or communications would be a very great addition to the university education.
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell User Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 2,294 Senior Member
    I don't think a psychology undergrad is really going to help you

    The statistics, modeling, data analysis, and design of experiment aspects of psychology are a huge help with any sort of empirical work, especially in business. The most of the fields of Marketing and OB are based around the methods of psychology.
  • ccer123ccer123 Registered User Posts: 25 New Member
    So what second major would be good to go into consulting?

    How much would it matter? If I do the second major it will be hard to graduate a semester early like I hoped it, and I would not get to take any classes outside of my business degree and X degree after freshman year.
  • openedskittlesopenedskittles Registered User Posts: 954 Member
    I'd say a good option if you're okay with another year would be to go for a CPA. Part of the requirements to sit for the exam are 30 hours of anything you chose (basically a whole year) and you would be a licensed accountant, which would make you more valuable to employers.
  • hmom5hmom5 - Posts: 10,882 Senior Member
    Engineering (BME would be my top pick, EE/SC second), math, economics.
  • ccer123ccer123 Registered User Posts: 25 New Member
    What do you think of statistics as a 2nd major for consulting? Or is econ better?
  • hmom5hmom5 - Posts: 10,882 Senior Member
    Stats will not make you attractive to consulting firms.
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