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How hard is it to go from engineering to finance with the help of an MBA?

2

Replies to: How hard is it to go from engineering to finance with the help of an MBA?

  • BurgermeisterBurgermeister Registered User Posts: 364 Member
    Collegesurfer093 is getting a variety of great opinions here! One last anecdote for you. Told all my kids to reach. I was happy as an engineer but all of them chose financial paths. We all climb our ladders differently.
  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 7,238 Senior Member
    @monydad : The fifth paragraph of your above post is right on target.
  • monydadmonydad Registered User Posts: 7,903 Senior Member
    Please note that in #17 I am describing a front-office position in an investment bank.
    The details would be quite different for a trading floor position. But still you would have to fit those different needs from an interpersonal perspective, and not all engineers do fit.

    I cannot comment much on the myriad other types of jobs and firms that are also part of "finance".
    On Monday I plan to go into my local bank branch, where I will encounter tellers, and the branch manager and assistant manager. They are also part of "finance", and I can't comment much on their jobs. But I'm guessing an engineering background is not a key prerequisite for those either.
  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 7,238 Senior Member
    edited February 9
    OP does have an advantage of being in Boston at BU-Questrom on a full tuition scholarship. Although not an IB target school, OP can get great interviews with sustained, directed hard work with respect to job hunting.

    Additionally, management consulting firms should value an engineer with an MBA & significant work experience.
  • Darcy123Darcy123 Registered User Posts: 174 Junior Member
    A fair number of the engineers I know ended up on the research side of the house - particularly covering tech stocks. There's still a need for soft skills, but there's more of a premium put on understanding the company's business. Tech focused VCs is another heavy concentration. Most of the people who went into trading or into traditional financial analyst roles went right out of undergrad, and basically figured out that they didn't want to be engineers. Their degree was definitely not an impediment and they had the necessary soft skills.
  • gardenstategalgardenstategal Registered User Posts: 5,193 Senior Member
    This is an ideal comBo for anyone wanting to work where finance and tech jntersect -- VC, analyst following tech industry, M&A in tech sector, public finance (especially infrastructure ).

    The MBA program itself is more likely to determine whether your options would be at the most prestigious firms or others, but ime, used right, this is a terrific combined skill set.
  • cbreezecbreeze Registered User Posts: 4,752 Senior Member
    VCs are buy-side finance which is very different from sell-side investment banks. Buy-side firms like VCs, hedge funds seldom hire people without some sell-side experience as they don't have formal training programs like big investment banks and they expect you to be productive from the get go. Generally, you don't see VCs, hedge funds recruiting at schools at all.

    I think we are making a big generalization about engineers not possessing soft skills.
  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 7,238 Senior Member
    Just because it may be a big generalization, doesn't mean that it is inaccurate.
  • cbreezecbreeze Registered User Posts: 4,752 Senior Member
    ^^But it's not entirely accurate.
  • cbreezecbreeze Registered User Posts: 4,752 Senior Member
    edited February 10
    duplicate post.
  • 1NJParent1NJParent Registered User Posts: 938 Member
    Generally, you don't see VCs, hedge funds recruiting at schools at all.
    That's not entirely accurate. Big name quantitative HFs recruit heavily on some campuses.
  • perazzimanperazziman Registered User Posts: 2,420 Senior Member
    edited February 11
    The Quant funds are a niche. They are looking for an entirely different type of person. They are looking for people with extremely strong Math skills- not just the common Physics, Math and EE majors, but those who have taken upper level math (Stochastic calculus, Real Math, Probability Theory, PDE and lots of Statistics and programming etc.) and have extremely high GRE / GMAT Q scores. We are talking about 169/170 on the GRE and 50+ on GMAT.

    If this is the kind of Financial Engineering job OP is after, I would recommend Princeton’s MFin not the BU MBA Program.
  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 7,238 Senior Member
    edited February 11
    @perazziman : I think that you meant "750+" on the GMAT.

    I agree about the Princeton Master's in Finance.
  • perazzimanperazziman Registered User Posts: 2,420 Senior Member
    edited February 11
    @Publisher
    The highest possible score on GMAT is 51 V and 51 Q which corresponds to a composite 790 or 800
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