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Top Undergrad to get into good Biz School?

SmyttySmytty Registered User Posts: 215 Junior Member
edited July 2006 in Business School - MBA
What are the top schools to get an Undergrad degree from in order to get into a top business school?
Post edited by Smytty on
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Replies to: Top Undergrad to get into good Biz School?

  • DawgieDawgie Registered User Posts: 1,576 Senior Member
    UMass, Bunker Hill, Massasoit, Johnson and Wales
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    Jizuaz! Can people just read previous post before posting the same crap?

    Any top-tier school will do--simply b/c they lead to better employment opportunities after graduation. In reality, all that truly matters is your work experience--and what you did there.
  • tomslawskytomslawsky Registered User Posts: 1,378 Senior Member
    I really think that your undergrad school doesn't matter. Graduate with a 3.2+, choose a career that is unique and make a doccumentable impact.
  • tomslawskytomslawsky Registered User Posts: 1,378 Senior Member
    I think that Wildflower is being a bit sanctimonious by saying "top-tier school". Obtaning a professional job after college and making an impact within the company are the top qualities looked for. They also like to select people from unique industries. I was told this information by admissions people at the University of South Florida, University of Tampa and the University of Florida.
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    I'll have to agree--but only to a point. I say top-tier school b/c they open more doors to their graduates. If you can get meaningful work experience and the rest of your application is compelling, you should do well in the process.
  • Mr PayneMr Payne Registered User Posts: 8,850 Senior Member
    Everything else being equal, simply going to a big name (highly ranked) school in the geographic area you are looking at is the best decision.
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    "Everything else being equal, simply going to a big name (highly ranked) school in the geographic area you are looking at is the best decision."

    Unless there are so extra-ordinary financial problems (or you receive a full ride from a lesser-ranked school), I don't think anyone can refute Mr Payne's post.
  • sakkysakky - Posts: 14,759 Senior Member
    They also like to select people from unique industries.

    Well, I don't know if they like it THAT much. At every top B-school, the vast majority of students are former consultants, bankers, or engineers, or military officers.
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    "Well, I don't know if they like it THAT much. At every top B-school, the vast majority of students are former consultants, bankers, or engineers, or military officers."

    Sakky, I don't think he was referring to top B-schools (ie top 20). I mean, look at the sources.
  • sakkysakky - Posts: 14,759 Senior Member
    I understand what the sources are. But the OP was asking about top B-schools, and I think it bears mention that the top B-schools all tend to want the same thing.
  • tomslawskytomslawsky Registered User Posts: 1,378 Senior Member
    I disagree, I think that the top programs admit many "consultants, bankers, or engineers, or military officers" simply because these people make up the large majority of the QUALIFIED applicant pool.

    http://www.businessschooladmission.com/admissions_criteria.html

    Average Years of Work Experience and Average Age

    These criteria are nearly uniform across all the top business schools. The difference between the successful applicant at Stanford or Harvard and the applicant who is only successful at the bottom 5 of these MBA schools is that the "stereotypical" student at Stanford or Harvard has a remarkable resume with many accomplishments and rapid promotions whereas the "stereotypical" business student at USC (Marshall) or Vanderbilt (Owen) has achieved one or maybe two promotions in his or her 4 to 5 years of work experience and had nothing exciting or dramatic to report in the application essays to the top schools.

    Notice there is no mention of undergraduate school or industry type?
  • Mr PayneMr Payne Registered User Posts: 8,850 Senior Member
    So, are you suggesting that a porn producer would be a quicker ticket to a top MBA school?
  • tomslawskytomslawsky Registered User Posts: 1,378 Senior Member
    No, most schools have some sort of ethical standard that they expect from students, I don't think that porn producer would fall under that guideline-with Berkeley being the possible exception LOL.
  • sakkysakky - Posts: 14,759 Senior Member
    These criteria are nearly uniform across all the top business schools. The difference between the successful applicant at Stanford or Harvard and the applicant who is only successful at the bottom 5 of these MBA schools is that the "stereotypical" student at Stanford or Harvard has a remarkable resume with many accomplishments and rapid promotions whereas the "stereotypical" business student at USC (Marshall) or Vanderbilt (Owen) has achieved one or maybe two promotions in his or her 4 to 5 years of work experience and had nothing exciting or dramatic to report in the application essays to the top schools.

    Notice there is no mention of undergraduate school or industry type?

    True, there is no FORMAL mention of undergrad school or industry type. Yet the fact is, such a mention is implied, for the simple reason that certain undergrad schools tend to get people better jobs and certain industries tend to promote people faster and/or provide better opportunities. The fact is, consulting and banking are considered to be prime career fields for advancement simply because of the nature of the work - there is a lot of opportunity to see interesting things and develop quick responsibility. On the other hand, there are plenty of organizations that shall remain unnamed that are basically 'sleepy' in that not a whole lot ever happens, where promotion and responsibility tend to come via seniority rather than by merit, and where ambition and initiative are often times frowned upon. It's hard to build a resume that will make you worthy of a top MBA school if you get stuck in one of these jobs.

    Furthermore, certain undergrad programs, notably the most prestigious ones, are more likely to get you into a top consulting/banking job, because that's where they recruit. Goldman Sachs recruits at Harvard. Goldman Sachs does not recruit at UMass-Boston. Can you still get an offer from Goldman Sachs if you go to UMass-Boston? Sure. But it's a lot more work you have to do just to get noticed.

    The point is, when you say that consultants,bankers, engineers, military officers and the like have seized their opportunities, that's just saying that in those jobs, there are opportunities in those jobs that are available to be seized. In other words, it's not just about seizing whatever opportunities are available to you. It's also about putting yourself in a position where there are many opportunities so that you can seize them.
  • ab_medab_med Registered User Posts: 465 Member
    Top undergrad school: BERKELEY!
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