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Top 5 Schools vs. the Rest

freemumiafreemumia Registered User Posts: 38 Junior Member
edited April 2007 in Business School - MBA
Would you say there is a significant difference in job prospects and competitiveness coming out of a school such as Darden vs. Wharton?
Post edited by freemumia on

Replies to: Top 5 Schools vs. the Rest

  • gellinogellino Registered User Posts: 3,017 Senior Member
    I would say there is at least somewhat of a difference, which can be seen in avg starting salary, % of class employed, desirability of offers received. Wharton vs Darden is probably about a #3 vs #12 comparison. So, more of a difference than say UChicago vs MIT (say #5 vs #7), but less of a difference than HBS vs URochester (say #1 vs #23).
  • freemumiafreemumia Registered User Posts: 38 Junior Member
    Then why is that according to various rankings/charts avg. starting salary among t1 all the way down to t30 is relatievly the same? I think Wharton and Georgetown for example differ only by about 5K.
  • dallas808dallas808 Registered User Posts: 768 Member
    Real significant difference? No.

    Reputation/strength in specific programs often lure in an additional set of (smaller) recruiters to a school. But, overall, grads from most top 15 schools get the same face time with an almost identical set of major hiring firms.

    The avg salary used in national ranking don't factor in geographical differences and the pay difference between industries. E.g. Yale historically has a larger percentage of grads who go into non-profit/public sectors. Those low salary figures hurt them (in ranking) even though their Wall-St grads make about the same as others. Some schools break down salary/bonus information based on industry so compare those.
  • sakkysakky - Posts: 14,759 Senior Member
    Then why is that according to various rankings/charts avg. starting salary among t1 all the way down to t30 is relatievly the same? I think Wharton and Georgetown for example differ only by about 5K.

    Because starting salary is a deeply misleading way to look at MBA's, to the point that I don't understand why rankings insist on printing them. The truth is, the great bulk of compensation, especially in fields like finance, comes not from salary, but from the year-end bonus, or if you're talking about fields like private equity, then in the 'carry', which is a form of bonus. Of course, nobody actually knows exactly what the bonus is going to be in any given year, so I suppose that's one reason why rankings refuse to print them, but you can make some estimations. For example, it is now widely understood that Ibanking pays about 250-300k for 1st year associates, all included (meaning salary + bonus).
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