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Parents of the HS Class of 2017

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Replies to: Parents of the HS Class of 2017

  • moonpiemoonpie 536 replies6 threadsRegistered User Member
    Both my older 2 are premed. One a sophomore, a the other getting ready to graduate HS. My youngest...animals. Always. From the get go. Wants to be a research zoologist. Save species .... We'll see about that! Im in the medical field, and I think being exposed all their lives to children who were sick, or had special needs has made them see things a little differently. And 2 of my kids have their own special medical needs, making them appreciate their doctors and nurses even more. I think it's REALLY hard to know when you're in 8 th grade what you want to be.

    That being said, both my older 2 have said to take as much math and science as you can and to take AP if possible over DE. APs are accepted almost everywhere, whereas DE are not. Some colleges won't accept DE or online classes at all. Also, DE classes are figured into you college GPA, whereas AP are not. My oldest had 25 college credits through AP classes. It allowed her to skip some lower level easy classes, but really was most helpful when she changed her major (yes, IT HAPPENS) because she wasn't behind due to having so many classes under her belt already. BUT, if you know where you're going, And know they accept DE classes, and KNOW you'll get an A...then a good way to boost GPA before you get there. Just something to ponder while you're making HS class decisions : )
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  • CT1417CT1417 4362 replies22 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Commenting on Novimom's post that was a comment on HiToWa's post....I agree completely with this:

    "I hope our kids' high school lives will not be spent just to pursue the college acceptance. They should get involved in what they love and from those activities they will find out what colleges are suitable. Not the other way around ..."

    I had so much fun in high school, all while volunteering, working, participating in tons of what we now call ECs, and taking honors and one AP class. It was not this conscious path to college. I think the first mention of college was the second half of 10th grade when the GC talked to us in small groups about making sure we had some ECs. I feel like my boys are missing the fun of HS b/c they have to be conscious of the resume. It is a nationwide problem.

    Novimom--re: building Legos. Take a look at the MIT Media Lab's Facebook page. I have been following it for years as my boys used to love building Legos. Sadly, they have moved on, but I thought it was the best use of many of their younger hours. We visited the Media Lab a few years ago b/c my son had been in contact with the Scratch programmers (suggesting enhancements to their modules). Those MIT grad & PHD students in the Media Lab are still playing around with Legos. I think their focus is how children learn via playing, and I don't know how this leads to an occupation, but it was fun to see Legos and Mindstorms in a grad lab.
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  • NovimomNovimom 129 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Thanks for the advice! What is DE? I will have to look into that.

    I agree that it's hard to know what you want to do when you're in eighth grade! I wasn't premed until junior year in college. OTOH, hubby said he's wanted to be a doctor since grade school.

    I guess at this point speculating about the future is mostly for entertainment purposes....
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  • GourmetmomGourmetmom 2778 replies45 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My son has stopped talking about playing for the Red Sox, now he's onto making movies. I have viewed countless scenes of my house blowing up, catching on file, fighter jets passing overhead...the important thing to keep in mind is that it is a good thing when they are interested in SOMETHING. It really doesn't matter that much what; it's the drive to immerse themselves in an activity and get to the point of mastery and excellence that's important. And they really need to "own" their hobbies, ECs, schoolwork, etc., and not work solely to please their parents (although a little of that is okay :))
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  • NovimomNovimom 129 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Well I guess DE must be distance education. My kids have done some online courses and it worked well for the older but not so much the younger. Not sure how much was age and how much personality- I suspect a little of both.

    What DE courses have your kids done/do you recommend?
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  • NovimomNovimom 129 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Thanks also for the tips for Lego loving kids... Another thing to check out!
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  • CT1417CT1417 4362 replies22 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I think DE may be dual enrollment. Have no idea how that operates or what it means for college.
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  • CuriousJaneCuriousJane 764 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    I don't think that most 8th graders can accurately predict what they'll want to be when they go to college, but I do think that a child's dreams can provide a window into who they are, and how they think about themselves at that moment in time.

    I had the cutest conversation with one of our fourth graders at school the other day. He told me "It used to be that the only thing I wanted to be was an NBA player, but my dad told me you should have more than one plan. So, now I want to grow up, go to college and become an engineer. I'll do that until I'm bored, maybe 20 years, and then I'll join the NBA". I loved the whole conversation, partially because we work so hard with our students to convince them that they can see college as an option, and partially because the idea of a 42 year old NBA rookie appeals to me at my advanced age. I don't think that particular dream will come true for that particular child, but I do think we can listen to it and learn about what makes this kid's heart sing (sports, and problem solving), and who he looks up to (Dad), and how thinks about his future (with confidence).
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  • sseamomsseamom 4880 replies25 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Jane, I think you're right. Most of the now-adult kids I know showed some interest in the area they later chose to study or work at when they were young. My niece may not have really known what an "office job" was, but she did study business and works in an office when she grew up. And the Mythbusters didn't exist yet when my S was little, but he ALWAYS wanted to know how things worked or how to fix broken stuff. I knew before he was in school that his cousin's idea of heaven-office jobs, would be his LEAST favorite.

    New topic-what are your kids' schools doing for 8th grade promotions/end of year? Our school does an awards day for the whole school, and an evening promotion ceremony for the 8th graders. They specifically don't call it a graduation.

    Then they're going on an overnight to Portland, for which they're fundraising though various activities-parents' night out is my D's area of organization-watching the little kids is her idea of perfect. It's a really affordable trip and it's educational, so the PTO can help fund any of the kids who can't afford it even with the fundraising. I'd go as a chaperone, but it would involve sleeping on the floor and my body can't do floors anymore. The perils of being an "old mom".
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  • vandygrad87vandygrad87 710 replies29 threadsRegistered User Member
    Hi everyone,

    Just saying Hello to all of you. I've got a graduating HS Senior this year so my focus has been on her, but starting next year I guess I'll start planning for my middle child- a son- who will graduating HS in 2017. Whoo hoo! It will be interesting to go down this path again and hopefully with more wisdom and less stress than the first time.

    Moonpie, your posts on what to do when were amazing. I saved them in a Word file for future reference. You rock!

    My kids attend a small school (well, the older two do and the youngest starts 6th grade there next school year) and there is an 8th grade retreat and then graduation. Not sure the date on that or what's expected.

    My son will be taking English 9H, Biology, Algebra 2 (they do the Algebras in line with each other so Geometry follows), Spanish 2, PE, whatever the 9th grade history class is and I guess something else. I haven't a clue. I need to go look. There isn't a lot of choice for 9th grade beyond the math/science track and the honors English.

    Looking forward to getting to know all of you, although I'm not a frequent poster, especially once things get really busy.
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  • CuriousJaneCuriousJane 764 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    Our school does a "graduation" ceremony for the 8th graders in the High School gym. My son went last year because the chamber chorus sang, and said that there are a couple speeches by kids, one by the principal, chamber chorus sings, band plays, they all go home. He says they don't call individual names.

    The main thing I know about graduation is that every kid gets 4 tickets. 2 for the bleachers in the gym, and 2 to watch a video feed in the auditorium, and every year the parent listserv is full of complaining, scheming and trading.
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  • NovimomNovimom 129 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    We went to last year's middle school graduation as well because older son is in orchestra. There is a separate awards ceremony for the whole school. Graduation sounds similar to others, few speeches, kids in uniform but not cap and gown, everyone walks across the stage. Kids whose parents or relatives have a relationship with the school can have them give them their diploma. All followed by a small reception (coffee and donut style).


    Jane your story of the kid who wanted to be an engineer and go to the NBA was so cute!

    And I agree that while my kids don't know exactly what they want to so, they are showing inclinations. Neither one will be a history or English major, or athlete or musician. Something STEM for sure. It will be interesting to see where they will end up.
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  • ProudpatriotProudpatriot 1538 replies12 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My kids are at a school where upper school is 7-12 grade. 7/8 is considered Jr. High with 9-12 being High School. There are only a few distinctions between Jr. High and High school so the move from 8 to 9 is not considered a big deal and nothing is done to mark the transition (thankfully).
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  • our2girlsour2girls 531 replies0 threadsRegistered User Member
    Our D'17 goes to a catholic grade school, up to 8th grade, so we celebrate 8th grade graduation, which is a school mass in our church, and a get together afterwards in the school hall with cake and a slide show of their past 9 years together. All the kids end up going to mostly different high schools, so the cake has eveyone's name on it in frosting, and the high school they will attend, in their high school colors. Always a neat cake! Sometimes there is an after party for the graduates and immediate families, and it seems like the kids stay for awhile after the parents leave...but then the parents go back to pick up the kids.

    Also, the 7th grade class and parents set up/serve cake and punch/clean up for the 8th grade graduation, so the 8th graders and their parents/famiies can enjoy themselves :)
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  • CuriousJaneCuriousJane 764 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    Ourgirls,

    That sounds like a really sweet tradition.
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  • our2girlsour2girls 531 replies0 threadsRegistered User Member
    CuriousJane - it's a great tradition! Another tradition in our parish is that the second Saturday in February the 8th graders receive their high school admittance letters...we live in a city that has a lot of catholic high schools and all acceptance letters are sent on Friday. Once your DD or DS get their letter you go and get balloons in their school colors and tie them to your porch (a lot of bungalows and smiliar type houses with porches in the area). Our parish school is small, and most of the kids live in the neighborhood, so we usually leave for 5:00 mass early that evening and drive around to see where kids were accepted. Of course it's all known right away because of FB and twitter and all, but the tradition still stands. First communicants receive a large white bow that parents attach on their front door...I love our parish traditions!
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  • CuriousJaneCuriousJane 764 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    That sounds great! Is your daughter excited about the high school she'll be attending?
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  • CuriousJaneCuriousJane 764 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    I have a question for all of you. What kinds of rules or expectations do you have for where your kids can go, and how often they check in, and what time they come home?

    I tend to be pretty "free range" and we live in a safe area with great public transportation, and I'm happy my kid is gaining the confidence and the skills to go out and explore, but I'm starting to feel like we need some limits, so I'm wondering what other people do.

    Today for example, he left the house slightly before seven a.m., and he hasn't come home yet 12 hours later. I've called a few times to check in, so I have a vague idea of what he's done. So far, he's reffed 4 little kid soccer games, went to Chipotle, went back to the field to wait forhis BFF to finish reffing and then to the BFF's house to play video games, and is now at "a party". The party is at a friend of the Bff's house, and he assures me that the parents are home, although I didn't insist on talking to them. Maybe I should have?

    Anyway, what are your limits for your kids?
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  • NovimomNovimom 129 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    CuriousJane -

    That's a tough one! We don't have good public transportation where we live so the kids are pretty dependent on us to drive them everywhere. So the scenario you describe is essentially unheard of for us. I do remember one time S1 (13 yo) took off on his bike without his cell phone (bike ride was with my permission although in retrospect I wish I had sent his phone with him) and it was very disconcerting for me not to know where he was. He did eventually come home for dinner.

    That being said, when I was 13, I had free range of a major city. School would let out before 3PM and I would be on my own until my parents came home. I would often take public transportation downtown, hang out with my friends, come home and finish HW (maybe) or more likely, watch lots of TV before my parents came home. Even before this, when we lived in the suburbs, I had free range of the neighborhood on my bike.

    The trend these days seems to be a lot less independence for young people, perhaps to their detriment.

    So --- I think if your son has been gone for 12 hrs but you've spoken to him throughout the day, it seems like a reasonable amount of freedom for a mature 13 year old, if perhaps a bit more than what our kids are used to. I think there are some caveats... do you know his friends and do you trust them; same with parents of friends; same with son; and specifically, has son shown that he is reliable and trustworthy.

    The worse case scenario of course is adolescent experimentation that veers into self-destructive behavior but I'm not sure that intense scrutiny of our kids necessarily prevents that.
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  • CuriousJaneCuriousJane 764 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    I know the Bff and I'd describe both boys (mine, and friend) as pretty responsible, with a good head on their shoulders. I don't know the kid whose house they're at. I think my son just met him today.

    I don't have any reason to suspect that my son is experimenting with anything, and if he was I don't know that a curfew would stop it, but I'm also worried that if I don't set limits now, and then try to impose them on a sixteen year old it could be rough. Maybe that's just borrowing trouble though.

    I think we need some reasonable limits. I'm just not sure what they are.
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