right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

Colby's New Athletic Center (a $200million infrastructure investment)

2

Replies to: Colby's New Athletic Center (a $200million infrastructure investment)

  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 17
    I have trained on indoor tracks that were one tenth of a mile. Never again. I believe that Harvard has a 220 yard track which is 8 laps to the mile.

    It is wonderful to have an indoor track in a state with such severe cold weather, but it should not be used for training for serious runners in my opinion due to the unnecessary additional stress placed on runners' joints.

    If spending or land were not issues, then the fault lies in planning & priorities.

    Another option might have been a six or eight lane 200 meter track (if, as suggested above, required by the NCAA) and a four lane 400 meter track for training purposes for serious competitors in middle & long distances.

    Of course, ice hockey, swimming & soccer / football & weight lifting all need their space as well.

    P.S. I believe that another poster who wrote that NCAA rules require a 200 meter track for indoor competition is incorrect (unless recently changed). But, as of 2013, although the NCAA recognized 200 meter tracks as typical for indoor competition, the NCAA rules permit either a longer or shorter indoor track for competitions.

    If serious about competing & training for middle to long distances, go to a school in a warm weather climate where one can train outdoors year round.
    edited August 17
    · Reply · Share
  • sushirittosushiritto 3842 replies9 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 17
    There’s an indoor track at the Y in Ann Arbor. I’m guessing it’s probably the same number of laps per mile, although the outside lanes will reduce that number. When I’m in AA, and it’s cold outside, even that small of a track is really nice to use and have available.

    Regarding additional stress on runner’s joints due to the shortness of the 200 meter indoor track, allegedly, according to the UMich website:
    Using Beynon Sports' "Rise-N-Run" technology, the track -- surfaced with the same BSS-2000 material used at the 2016 IAAF World Indoor Championships and at many world-class facilities -- can be raised or lowered from flat to banked. The hydraulic actuators (constructed by Mitchell Machine Works) that lift the track can create an embankment on the curves of up to 10 degrees, subjecting the student-athletes' bodies to less stress and creating more speed as they navigate the track's two turns.

    Now, whether it does or not, I don’t know. And whether Colby will use the same technology, I don’t know.

    https://mgoblue.com/sports/2017/6/16/facilities-track-field-html.aspx
    edited August 17
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 17
    The main concerns with 200 meter or smaller tracks ( Millrose Games are run on a track in NYC that requires eleven (11) laps per mile) are the tight turns & banked curves.

    In order to counterbalance the negative health effects on runners feet, ankles, knees & hips, indoor tracks--at least many years ago--would require runners to reverse their running direction on alternate days. Occasionally results in a bad collision among runners.

    The small tracks of less than 400 meters came about due in large part to space limitations in existing structures, or due to high cost of land and budget limitations.

    200 meter tracks are fun for runners because even a small crowd makes a large prescence & a loud noise. Plus, more spectator seating space.

    The additional stress on a runner's body is evident quite quickly.

    Many competitive runners achieve faster times on a 200 meter track due to the raised curves.

    200 meter tracks also tend to have just 6 lanes rather than the traditional 8 lanes found on a 400 meter track. Makes training dangerous and unpredictable when not restricted to track team members. Lots of competitive runners train twice a day. On 8 lane tracks, joggers & recreational runners are often instructed by signs to stay in the outer lanes in order to avoid collisions & in order to allow competitive runners to train at their typical pace.

    P.S. Many trainers claim that raised banks create an imbalance that causes additional stress to runners' bodies. Raised banks make speed easier to achieve for those on the outside lanes.
    edited August 17
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 17
    @sushiritto : The article notes that the new facilty at the University of Michigan includes a 200 meter competion track surrounded by a 300 meter, 3 lane, practice track.

    The 300 meter track is less stressful on runners' bodies. It would be unwise for a middle distance or long distance runner to continually train on a 200 meter track due to increased liklihood of stress related injury.

    The article states that the outer lane can be raised by 10 degrees to increase speed & reduce stress. While it does increase speed for runners on the outer lane or two, trainers have written that the raised curves cause additional stress to the runner; that is way the hydraulics are only used during competitions.

    Absolutely beautiful facility !

    As an aside, Northwestern University just built a $260 million dollar glass enclosed football training facility on the beach of Lake Michigan on NU's main campus in Evanston. Spectacular views.
    edited August 17
    · Reply · Share
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22636 replies15 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Years ago I lived in a complex with a pretty nice rec center. The pool was a 50 meter regulation, but for half the year there was a deck the came down in the middle making two pool of, I think 25 years. I much preferred the 25 yard lanes because then there were fewer people in the lanes and the 50 meters was just too long for me.

    So bigger isn't always better, and not everyone is going to the Olympics. Some people are just working out.
    · Reply · Share
  • sushirittosushiritto 3842 replies9 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Publisher although the UMich verbiage says otherwise, I agree with you that the more mileage on a shorter track isn’t good for your body, because turning and the banking will present angular issues that your ankles, knees, hips, back, neck, etc. will have to compensate for. I’m sure that’s why NASCAR and Indy race cars change their tires often during their races as well as setup their cars specifically for embankment racing.

    Regarding NU and their new facility, it’s a wealthy private school, would you expect anything differently? 😉 Hopefully, the new facility will help NU become more competitive in all sports.
    · Reply · Share
  • parentgeorgiaparentgeorgia 100 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    the newest and most advanced indoor 350,000 sq.ft. athletic facility in the nation about to open it's doors to our Waterville/Colby community with an environmentally sound design and building that includes a compact footprint, renewable energy, ecosystem-sensitive landscape with native plantings, and wetland conservation...and some are splitting hairs on 200 vs 400 meters....! Please..be gracious and thankful..!
    · Reply · Share
  • 2019RuralMe2019RuralMe 79 replies16 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited August 21
    I think the residents of Waterville (and central Maine) are very grateful for Colby's investment into Colby's facilities and the Waterville community. During the summer, on almost any day or night, you'll find baseball teams from around Maine playing on the new Colby turfed field. The new indoor track while primarily for the Colby community will most likely be open to local high school students to practice and compete in during Maine's frigid/dark winter days and nights...just like Colby's Alfond Field House currently does. If one is a student, alumnus or alumna of Colby, you should be proud of what Colby is building. Thank you Colby for your commitment & investment.
    edited August 21
    · Reply · Share
  • HamSBDadHamSBDad 54 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @Publisher I suspect you are not a track athlete. Indoor tracks of 400 meters are not legal for competitive purposes. So in essence if they had built a 400 meter indoor track, the Colby T&F team would not be able to compete on it or host meets.
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 28
    @HamSBDad: What is the source of your information ?

    Pretty sure that you are incorrect on both counts. However, I would like to know your source.

    Just check out the Millrose Games track size & see if you still think so.
    edited August 28
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 28
    @HamSBDad: In the recent past (about 2013), the NCAA "defined" an indoor track as 200 meters, but did not require that size for competition. Nevertheless, a particular conference might have their own rules which differ from NCAA rules.

    P.S. I cannot find the requirement that you mention. Again, what is your source ?

    The Millrose Games switched venues due to financial losses & the desire for a larger track, but not due to any requirement re: track size.
    edited August 28
    · Reply · Share
  • 2019RuralMe2019RuralMe 79 replies16 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @HamSBDad and @Publisher, you're getting off topic...this is about Colby's investment, not T&F field requirements....interesting as that might be.
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 29
    I agree, but Colby College had a chance to enhance its stature worldwide with the construction of a 400 meter indoor running track.

    I responded to @HamSBDad because I believe that his information posted in this thread is incorrect.

    All appreciate Colby College's investment in its athletic facilities, but a 200 meter track should not be used for middle distance & long distance training. Okay for walking & slow jogging, however.
    edited August 29
    · Reply · Share
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn 38082 replies2085 threadsSuper Moderator Super Moderator
    @Publisher, as far as I can tell, there is only one track in the country that is 400 m or larger. It's in Utah. I see only a small handful of tracks that are larger than 200 m. https://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/IndexReport_FINAL.pdf (Appendix A).

    Why would a tiny college in Maine build one that doesn't align with almost any other one in the country?
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 29
    To attract more apps. To show awareness of the increased injury potential encountered by training on a 200 meter track. Because 400 meter track is the worldwide standard, but exceptions are made for indoor tracks due to cost & space limitations ( not areas of concern for a school in rural Maine with such a healthy budget). Because it is cold in Maine for much of the school year, so indoor facilities are important to steer students away from heavy useage of alcohol.

    Just because other institutions are limited by space & budget considerations doesn't mean that a school without those limitations should go second class--and a 200 meter track is definitely second class when compared to the worldwide standard 400 meter track. Location is a factor.

    Maine is cold so students will train & exercise indoors for much of the year. Warmer locations can install a 200 meter track due to cost & space limitations, but usually have an outdoor 400 meter track that is comfortable for the entire school year. (Limit useage of the 200 meter track for competitions & for training for the 60 meter events.)

    So many more reasons, but the short version is that Colby College had a chance to do it right. Unquestionably, a 400 meter track is safer for all.

    P.S. The increased positive publicity alone would have made the investment in an indoor 400 meter track worthwhile for Colby College.

    As an aside: Maine has the oldest population among the 50 states & Maine has difficulty attracting & retaining young people. Of course this is due to many factors, but recreational & healthy activities are important to young adults & to young families.
    edited August 29
    · Reply · Share
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn 38082 replies2085 threadsSuper Moderator Super Moderator
    A 200 m track is not "second class" by any definition of the term. 200 m IS the standard for collegiate tracks, as shown in the link I posted.
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    A more careful reading of the link you posted might change your opinion. Just read the "Preface" carefully.

    Regardless, I am not here to debate so I will bow out as I have made my point.
    · Reply · Share
  • HamSBDadHamSBDad 54 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @Publisher I did not mention 200 meters, nor did your comment I responded to. You mentioned building a 400M indoor track. NCAA rules defer to the IAAF track construction rules. Per IAAF, 200M is the standard but there are some variations allowed for and times adjusted for since a shorter track is slower. A 400M indoor track is way outside the norm and would not be allowed for records. And why would a college want to build a track outside the norm. They are not building it for you to do your training on. It is for racing primarily and then for speed workouts. It is ridiculous to conduct any long training on a track. That is not, nor ever has been the purpose of a track.
    Good for Colby to make the investment in a proper indoor track.
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 30
    @HamSDad: Contrary to your assertion in post #29 in this thread, a 400 meter track is legal by NCAA standards for indoor competition.

    And, also contrary to your incorrect assertions in post #29 above, Colby College could host meets & compete on an indoor 400 meter track.

    If Colby College built the indoor track only for actual track competitions then fine because it is easier to compare times among 200 meter tracks with the only adjustment needed is for banked versus non-banked 200 meter tracks.

    I assumed that the indoor track was constructed for use by the entire student body & for training purposes during severely cold weather(which is so often found in Maine during the school year).
    edited August 30
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 7721 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    All 200 meter indoor tracks are second class due to their small size & tendency to promote injuries to ankles, knees & hips due to the frequency & severity of curves.

    The University of Michigan's new 200 meter indoor track accomodates training by allowing expansion to 300 meters for three lanes.

    Colby College had a chance--the space & the resources--to do something great, but chose to just follow the pack even though others typically are constrained by space and/or funding limitations.
    · Reply · Share
Sign In or Register to comment.

Recent Activity