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Is it harder to get into college out of state?

graceclassof2013graceclassof2013 Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
edited November 2012 in College Admissions
I am applying to the University of Colorado Boulder.

I was told by several people that it would actually be easier for me to get in since I live in Virginia and they want my money or something, but I was online and I read something that said that the requirements for admission were harder for out of state students because they have a certain number of out of state kids that they can let in.

Which one is it?
Post edited by graceclassof2013 on

Replies to: Is it harder to get into college out of state?

  • cortana431cortana431 - Posts: 5,015 Senior Member
    It depends on the college; the UCs, for example, seek out of state students who are paying more while other state schools such as UNC chapel hill and UVA are much more difficult to be accepted as an out of state applicant regardless of money.
  • graceclassof2013graceclassof2013 Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
    So are you saying I'll have an okay chance of getting into CU Boulder?
  • collagedadcollagedad Registered User Posts: 65 Junior Member
    43% of students at UC Boulder are from out of state (According to BigFuture). I would say they welcome OOS and the $$ they bring in
  • drusbadrusba Registered User Posts: 9,580 Senior Member
    It may be somewhat but not significantly harder than residents to get into UColorado. Colorado requires that the enrolled freshman class of UColorado be at least 55% residents which requires the university to admit residents at higher rate than that to assure that level of enrollment. Nevertheless, non-residents will not find it overly difficult to be admitted if their stats are within the college's usual range. There have been rumors/reports that colleges have been admitting more OOS than before to get the higher tuition money to make up for decreases in funds being provided by state legislatures. Though there is probably some truth to that, you should not assume that will make it easier for you to be admitted. The college has to be very careful to avoid any appearance of favoring OOS applicants not just because of the state 55% rule but also because if the citizenry of Colorado believes their kids are being rejected because of some favortism to non-residents, they will be up in arms, they will skewer their state representatives, who in turn will skewer the university officals by having them fired.
  • graceclassof2013graceclassof2013 Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
    Okay thank you :) My stats are all in/ a little over CU Boulder's mid ranges so hopefully I'll stand a chance.
  • entomomentomom Registered User Posts: 23,658 Senior Member
    ^And you're willing and able to pay the 45k/yr OOS COA for CU?
  • graceclassof2013graceclassof2013 Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
    I'm going to see how much scholarship money I end up recieving first.
  • entomomentomom Registered User Posts: 23,658 Senior Member
    My stats are all in/ a little over CU Boulder's mid ranges so hopefully I'll stand a chance.
    I'm going to see how much scholarship money I end up recieving first.

    Merit awards generally go to the tip top applicants, generally the top 5-10% of the admissions pool. I assume you have already checked the CU website to see which scholarships are available to OOS students and how much they give each year?

    I'm not saying you shouldn't apply, just trying to give you a realistic understanding of how admissions/FA/merit aid works.
This discussion has been closed.