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Why do public colleges admit more from in state?

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Replies to: Why do public colleges admit more from in state?

  • GumbymomGumbymom Forum Champion UC Posts: 26,989 Forum Champion
    Regarding the comment about CA UC's. Yes, it may be easier to get into a UC from OOS, but less OOS applicants apply so less competition vs in-state, Also there are higher requirements for OOS applicants vs in-state, so average GPA and test dcores tend to be higher than In-state.
  • UWfromCAUWfromCA Registered User Posts: 1,345 Senior Member
    OOS yield is also an important factor for the UCs:

    "Because the yield rate of domestic nonresident admits tends to be lower than for California resident admits, a campus must admit proportionally more domestic nonresident applicants to achieve a target for actual enrollees."

    http://senate.universityofcalifornia.edu/committees/boars/documents/BOARS2014CompareFavorablyReport.pdf

    And for other public universities such as UWashington:

    http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/education/uw-gains-record-freshman-class-exceeds-expectations/
  • billcshobillcsho Registered User Posts: 18,405 Senior Member
    edited September 2015
    Think about the population of California. There are simply way many more in state students than OOS students applying to UC. A higher admission rate for OOS does not mean it is easier to be admitted with the same credential as they are mostly self selected (financially and academically).
  • UWfromCAUWfromCA Registered User Posts: 1,345 Senior Member
    ^ Yes, for those reasons it's apparent why the stats of the average OOS applicant are higher.
  • billcshobillcsho Registered User Posts: 18,405 Senior Member
    The in state yield rate for most, if not all, public schools (not just UC) would be higher than the OOS. The lower cost, more eligible aids, and proximity to family are just some of the factors for that. While one variable factor is the proportion of OOS student in each school. There are public universities that admit >90% in state students while there are also schools that admit more than 40% OOS students. Obviously, the admission rate is related to the size of applicant pool and the seats available.
  • LBad96LBad96 Registered User Posts: 3,499 Senior Member
    @lostaccount NJ is an even better example. At least NY kids have fantastic private schools as viable options. We only have Princeton, TCNJ, and Stevens.
  • lostaccountlostaccount Registered User Posts: 5,409 Senior Member
    edited September 2015
    In terms of the California schools, well they are second to none in terms of state schools. By any measure, as a system it just has no rival. They are not hurting for applicants. They don't need to worry about attracting OOS. And it is not just that the Ca population is large so they get applicants. No, they are outstanding. So they attract many OOS students due to being such great schools. Consider how many top most "best" university lists. What a string of great schools UC-Berkeley, LA, San Diego, Davis, Santa Barbara, Irvine! Wow.

    LBad96, Does it really matter if the private schools are in NY or NJ-since OOS tuition at private schools is not higher than in state and NJ and NY are close.
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    @LBad96
    At least NY kids have fantastic private schools as viable options. We only have Princeton, TCNJ, and Stevens.

    Is there something physically barring you from driving a few minutes over the NJ state line to consider private universities in adjacent neighboring states?

    It's not like NJ is the size of Wyoming. ...

  • LBad96LBad96 Registered User Posts: 3,499 Senior Member
    @lostaccount it matters because those schools are good. NJ sucks.

    @GMTplus7 considering the fact that I currently go to school in North Carolina, I am currently unable to go to any state that neighbors NJ. My second choice school was in Connecticut, my fourth was on LI, and my safety was in my home state.
  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    This is like asking why food banks give away food, when they could make more money by selling the food.

    That's the whole point of them.

    Very true analogy, though even in-state tuition rates aren't exactly in the "giveaway" category.
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    @GMTplus7 considering the fact that I currently go to school in North Carolina, I am currently unable to go to any state that neighbors NJ. My second choice school was in Connecticut, my fourth was on LI, and my safety was in my home state

    We're int'l, so as far as I'm concerned NJ and NC are a stone's throw apart.

This discussion has been closed.