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College Admissions Statistics Class of 2021: Early and Regular Decision Acceptance Rates

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Replies to: College Admissions Statistics Class of 2021: Early and Regular Decision Acceptance Rates

  • ChembiodadChembiodad Registered User Posts: 1,992 Senior Member
    @Dorothy28, all seems consistent with what Swarthmore and Williams reported - 50-60% URM and 1st Gen, add 8-10% legacy and 10-15% sudent-athletes and the spots remaining is pretty thin.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,306 Senior Member
    @Ynotgo I disagree, the FA is fairly standard, at least year to year among the same schools, just a little bit of work and you will have a very good idea of what each school will offer (at least among the top schools that say they meet 100% of financial need). If you are below $60K than you will have all of your FA met by the schools that guarantee 100%. This is not a mystery and they don't pull FA out of a hat they use a standardized forum.
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    @CU123 If you are below $60K than you will have all of your FA met by the schools that guarantee 100%.

    There is always a student contribution even if the family contribution is determined to be zero. This is often on the order of $4k a year.
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,536 Senior Member
    For the many families in the doughnut hole (make too much for significant financial aid but can't afford their EFC), being able to compare merit aid packages including competitive merit ends up being essential.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,306 Senior Member
    @OHMomof2 As it should be.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,306 Senior Member
    @Ynotgo Personally I believe that anyone can "afford" their EFC, its more a question of priorities and if they think its "worth it". In the doughnut EFC is right around 25% of gross income for most schools.
  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,813 Senior Member
    Respectfully and totally disagree with @CU123. Having had two sons apply to college and having gotten a total of 26 financial aid packages, I can assure you that the numbers were not at all consistent with net price calculators for many of them. We qualify for a lot of aid, and there was a difference of up to 22K at schools that "meet 100% need". It can indeed be very complicated for a variety of reasons which are too long to go into here.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 1,306 Senior Member
    @sbjdorlo I found my DD FA packages to be close but then she only applied to nine, and complicating factors were not an issue for us.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    @Chembiodad: "all seems consistent with what Swarthmore and Williams reported - 50-60% URM and 1st Gen, add 8-10% legacy and 10-15% sudent-athletes and the spots remaining is pretty thin."

    Note that there would be overlap between those groups.
  • mohammadmohd18mohammadmohd18 Registered User Posts: 490 Member
    ^ I would assume the URM and 1st Gen were lumped together in the same category, so there's your overlap. The overlap between legacy and student-athletes would be marginal, because nowhere close to the majority of legacies are student-athletes, and nowhere close to the majority of student-athletes are legacies. At that point, you're just splitting hairs debating the overlap.
  • K9K9 Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    For what it's worth I graduated from Bates in the early 90s and when I was in high school of the CBB schools, Bowdoin was the toughest to get into followed by Bates and then Colby. One woman in my class of 320 got into Bowdoin and she was in the top 10 people in my class. I was #30 and got into Bates and waitlisted at Bowdoin and didn't even apply to Colby. Two other guys in my class who were ranked in the high 20s/low 30s got into Bates too and two women who were ranked in the 50s got into Colby.

    Also, college level courses and AP/Honors courses were weighted the same in my high school and I took all Honors and APs as did the two guys who went to Bates with me so we probably would have been ranked even higher if our courses had been given greater weight. We all went to a very good public school and all three of us have been very successful since graduating from Bates. I've been a journalist and professor and one of the guys runs a law firm and the other has been extremely successful running his own commercial real estate company. So we've all done fine.

    Maybe things have changed with the three schools since then, but this is just my personal perspective of them and personally, I don't think you'll go wrong with any of the three. I loved Bates and felt like I got a terrific education and I'm still close to many of the people I met there. It's an extremely friendly and supportive school.

    I can also tell you that Bates has been protesting the US News & World report rankings since I went there and as a result, the organization isn't big fans of the school. For years, the college didn't even submit information because they didn't feel like the methods used by US News were accurate.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    @K9: And that's why I prefer to tier by alumni achievements rather than rankings like USNews that are easily gamed:

    http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/college-search-selection/1893105-ivy-equivalents-ranking-based-on-alumni-outcomes-take-2-1-p1.html

    Bowdoin comes out an Ivy-equivalent.
    Bates ends up in the "good schools" tier with JHU, Davidson, and W&M.
    Colby doesn't make it.

    Measuring by top feeders:
    https://www.****/blog/category/infographics/
    Bowdoin is in the top 20 for PhDs overall, PhD history, PhD bio
    Bates is in the top 20 for elite MBA programs
    Colby is in the top 20 for PhD bio
  • odannyboySFodannyboySF Registered User Posts: 363 Member
    Still no data on these LACs?

    Amherst
    Bates
    Bryn Mawr
    Colgate
    Davidson
    Grinnell
    Oberlin
    Smith
    U of Richmond
    Washington & Lee
  • spayurpetsspayurpets Registered User Posts: 873 Member
    No, I couldn't find anything about those schools, @odannyboySF.

    But there were some more schools giving more details on admissions, including yield figures.

    Bowdoin yield 52% http://community.bowdoin.edu/news/2017/05/record-setting-number-of-applicants-diverse-and-aided-students-for-class-of-2021/

    Georgetown yield 49% http://www.thehoya.com/half-of-admitted-students-to-enter-class-of-2021/

    Georgetown also had an article about legacy admissions: http://www.thehoya.com/legacy-students-twice-as-likely-to-be-admitted/
  • K9K9 Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    Alumni achievement and satisfaction are both important components.

    Bates also has 19 Fulbright Scholars this year and one of the best debate teams in the world. The students I met there were not only very bright but also terrific people who cared about the right things in life. Many students wanted to use their smarts to make the world a better place, which to me, is something parents should hope their kids aspire to especially in todays' world.

    That being said, I don't think you could go wrong with Bates, Colby or Bowdoin. You will get a top tier education at all three places and it becomes more about whether you feel like it's the right place for you. My sister went to Bowdoin and liked it, I went to Bates and loved it (you'll find a lot of passionate Batesies out there!). The fit was perfect for me.

    Hope this helps.
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