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Here's what it really takes to get into the Ivy League these days

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Replies to: Here's what it really takes to get into the Ivy League these days

  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 894 Member
    a puff piece for sure, but like someone else said, the article points out necessary but not sufficient conditions to get into an ivy. Doesn't even mention the interview which is mandatory at Brown, and highly recommended at other places. And totally ignores the URM, legacy, athlete, first to attend college in their family, hooks, maybe because they're controversial. CC has know about this for a while, in the chance section the format asks for hooks, race, ethnicity in addition to academics, ECs, et al to evaluate an applicant.
  • hebegebehebegebe Registered User Posts: 1,866 Senior Member
    Hmm, I think interviews are rather unimportant at most places. I know MIT is an exception, and you mentioned Brown.

    Except for MIT, D did not do any interviews. However, she did meet with professors in almost every school she visited so she could discuss the medical research she helped perform the previous two summers. And she then referenced those discussions in the "Why us?" essay that most universities have.
  • TheGreyKingTheGreyKing Registered User Posts: 963 Member
    edited May 2
    Moderator's Note: I deleted the posts which prompted TheGreyKing's post below but it still is good advice.
    ED


    There is absolutely no place for ad hominem attacks on this website. They are inappropriate.
    Let's all refrain from commenting on people's ethnicities in a belittling manner AND from name-calling and/or attacking people.
    Post edited by Erin's Dad on
  • Loser160Loser160 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    I would really like to know what Brown didn't like about me. I like to think I have a rigorous schedule, and I got plenty of extracurricular activities on my application, with a very creative essay. My father went to brown, and my brother currently attends Brown. I am really thinking about writing an essay asking why did I not get accepted.
  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 894 Member
    @Loser160
    Brown - did you apply early, legacy helps most in ED or EA not as much in RD

    Colleges don't hold it against you if don't interview, but if you do, it shows interest and gives a chance for someone to see you not as a number, typically I agree when admission offices say that interviews tend to confirm the direction the decision was going anyway.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,746 Senior Member
    It would have been more interesting if they profiled some of the students who got admitted, especially those without the benefit of legacy status or being an athlete. What's really been eye opening to me on here is the quality of some of the ECs. You've got high school kids spending their summers doing research at Columbia, instead of lifeguarding at the local pool.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,746 Senior Member
    edited May 2
    It would have been more interesting if they profiled some of the students who got admitted, especially those without the benefit of legacy status or being an athlete. What's been eye opening to me on here is the quality of some of the ECs. You've got high school kids spending their summers doing research at Columbia, instead of lifeguarding at the local pool.
  • latinvibeslatinvibes Registered User Posts: 103 Junior Member
    @DaveMcBob Consider someone who hasn't exactly been given the best opportunities in the world because of socioeconomic reasons and are then given all the resources in the world to pursue what they love.

    The point I'm trying to drive home, and it seems like you agree with me, is that American universities are holistic for a reason. A test doesn't determine your potential, no matter whether you score high or low (more people tend to put down low scorers, not taking into consideration other factors like access to test prep courses and things of that nature).
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,746 Senior Member
    @latinvibes

    I think everyone knows the Ivies want to groom future leaders. It's not clear that being a star athlete, one of the best recruiting hooks you can have, is a good predictor of that. Nor is it clear that an opaque, subjective essay scoring process is a good predictor of that either. Internationally, most college admissions is far less holistic than in the US.
  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 894 Member
    The largest charity in the world is the Gates Foundation, started by Bill Gates who got a 1590. Similarly Zuckerberg of Facebook got a 1600 and his (and his wife's) charity give a lot as well. Both put their schools in the news (as dropouts I concede) and are doing good in the world. I do agree that people with more access to test prep and counselors will do better, but there are some kids that do well without too much studying and test prep, maybe just taking some practice tests. it's not like everyone who got a 2400 is wealthy, in our area they're mostly middle and upper middle class.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,948 Senior Member
    What a plug for IvyWise. :(

    Misconceptions still abound.
    And if you cling to them, forget it.

    And passion? Pffft. Not just what you love, think about it.
  • collegefan101collegefan101 Registered User Posts: 27 New Member
    Attend an Elite Prep School? Get Professional Advice? And a photo of a college consultant but not one mention of college guidance counselors. Superficial piece - better off just directing a high school student and family to the many more insightful pieces on CC
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