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College Admissions Statistics Class of 2022

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Replies to: College Admissions Statistics Class of 2022

  • citivascitivas 655 replies20 threads Member
    @margueriteburtzlaff Wow, those are great stats and athletic accomplishments. Sorry to hear your daughter is having a challenging admission season. I'm curious why she wasn't recruited for volleyball since she's one of the best in Texas? There's a girl at my daughter's high school who has already been recruited by Dartmouth as a sophomore based on volleyball.
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  • foosondaughterfoosondaughter 308 replies6 threads Member
    Adding Boston University from https://www.bu.edu/admissions/about-bu/profile/

    Also replaced "Total" with "Overall" for consistency.

    MIT RD (including 6,210 deferred from EA) 800 out of 18,359 (4.4%)
    MIT Overall (RD+EA) 1,464 out of 21,706 (6.7%)
    MIT EA 664 out of 9,557 (6.9%) (65.0% deferred, 26.1% denied, 1.9% withdrawn)
    Pomona Overall (RD+ED) 713 out of 10,245 (6.9%)
    Swarthmore Overall (ED+RD) 980 out of 10,749 (9.1%)
    Johns Hopkins Overall (RD+ED) 2,894 out of 29,128 (9.9%)
    Georgetown EA 1,002 out of 8,383 (12.0%)
    Williams Overall (RD+ED) 1,163 out of 9,559 (12.2%)
    Harvard SCEA 964 out of 6,630 (14.5%)
    Harvey Mudd Overall (RD+ED) (14.5%)
    Princeton SCEA 799 out of 5,402 (14.7%)
    Yale SCEA 842 out of 5,733 (14.7%) (55% deferred, 29% denied, 2% withdrawn/incomplete)
    WashU Overall (RD+ED) (15%)
    Tulane Overall ~6,598 out of 38,813 (17%)
    UNC Chapel Hill EA (Out of State) 2,742 out of ~15,233 (18%)
    Penn ED 1,312 out of 7,074 (18.5%)
    Davidson Overall ~1,066 out of 5,700 (18.7%)
    Wellesley Overall ~1,267 out of 6,670 (19%)
    Rice ED 371 out of 1,916 (19.4%) (includes 51 matched QuestBridge)
    Vanderbilt EDI+EDII (20.5%)
    Brown ED 738 out of 3,502 (21.1%)
    Duke ED 875 out of 4,090 (21.4%)
    UVA EA (Out of State) 3,382 out of 15,676 (21.6%)
    BU Overall ~14,184 out of 64,473 (22%)
    U.S. Coast Guard Academy EA 189 out of 834 (22.7%)
    Cornell ED 1,533 out of 6,319 (24.3%)
    Notre Dame REA 1,636 out of 6,598 (24.8%)
    Dartmouth ED 565 out of 2,270 (24.9%) (includes 26 matched QuestBridge)
    Emory (Oxford) ED1 223 out of ~892 (25%)
    Georgia Tech EA 4,677 out of 18,124 (25.8%) (46% in state, 19% out of state)
    Northwestern ED 1,072 out of 4,049 (26.5%)
    UVA EA (Total) 6,000 out of 21,573 (27.8%)(24.6% deferred)
    VIllanova Overall (RD+EA+ED) 6,545 out of 22,727 (28.8%)
    Hamilton ED1 191 out of 647 (29.5%) (includes 25 matched QuestBridge)
    Johns Hopkins ED 610 out of 2,037 (29.9%)
    UNC Chapel Hill EA (Total) 7,867 out of 25,867 (30.4%)
    Boston College EA 3,170 out of 10,350 (30.6%)
    Tulane ED 562 out of 1,819 (30.9%)
    Emory (Emory) ED1 503 out of ~1,623 (31%)
    Florida Overall 14,866 out of 40,849 (36.4%)
    Wesleyan ED1 279 out of 718 (38.9%)
    Emory (Emory and/or Oxford) ED1 726 out of > 1,700 (< 42.7%) (includes 30 matched QuestBridge)
    UVA EA (In State) 2,618 out of 5,897 (44.4%)
    Goorgia Overall (RD+EA) < 12,700 out of 26,500 (< 47.9%)
    UNC Chapel Hill EA (In State) 5,125 out of ~10,677 (48%)
    Santa Clara Overall (RD+ED) ~ 7,954 out of 16,233 (49%)
    Middlebury ED1 326 out of 650 (50.2%) (6% deferred, 43.8% denied)
    Georgia EA > 8,000 out of nearly 15,000 (> 53.3%)
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  • foosondaughterfoosondaughter 308 replies6 threads Member
    Adding Colby College Regular Decision from Colby Echo
    On March 16, Colby released 12,314 regular admissions decisions for the Class of 2022. 13% of these students- or 1,602 of them- received acceptance letters.
    MIT RD (including 6,210 deferred from EA) 800 out of 18,359 (4.4%)
    MIT Overall (RD+EA) 1,464 out of 21,706 (6.7%)
    MIT EA 664 out of 9,557 (6.9%) (65.0% deferred, 26.1% denied, 1.9% withdrawn)
    Pomona Overall (RD+ED) 713 out of 10,245 (6.9%)
    Swarthmore Overall (ED+RD) 980 out of 10,749 (9.1%)
    Johns Hopkins Overall (RD+ED) 2,894 out of 29,128 (9.9%)
    Georgetown EA 1,002 out of 8,383 (12.0%)
    Williams Overall (RD+ED) 1,163 out of 9,559 (12.2%)
    Colby RD 1,602 out of 12,314 (13%)
    Harvard SCEA 964 out of 6,630 (14.5%)
    Harvey Mudd Overall (RD+ED) (14.5%)
    Princeton SCEA 799 out of 5,402 (14.7%)
    Yale SCEA 842 out of 5,733 (14.7%) (55% deferred, 29% denied, 2% withdrawn/incomplete)
    WashU Overall (RD+ED) (15%)
    Tulane Overall ~6,598 out of 38,813 (17%)
    UNC Chapel Hill EA (Out of State) 2,742 out of ~15,233 (18%)
    Penn ED 1,312 out of 7,074 (18.5%)
    Davidson Overall ~1,066 out of 5,700 (18.7%)
    Wellesley Overall ~1,267 out of 6,670 (19%)
    Rice ED 371 out of 1,916 (19.4%) (includes 51 matched QuestBridge)
    Vanderbilt EDI+EDII (20.5%)
    Brown ED 738 out of 3,502 (21.1%)
    Duke ED 875 out of 4,090 (21.4%)
    UVA EA (Out of State) 3,382 out of 15,676 (21.6%)
    BU Overall ~14,184 out of 64,473 (22%)
    U.S. Coast Guard Academy EA 189 out of 834 (22.7%)
    Cornell ED 1,533 out of 6,319 (24.3%)
    Notre Dame REA 1,636 out of 6,598 (24.8%)
    Dartmouth ED 565 out of 2,270 (24.9%) (includes 26 matched QuestBridge)
    Emory (Oxford) ED1 223 out of ~892 (25%)
    Georgia Tech EA 4,677 out of 18,124 (25.8%) (46% in state, 19% out of state)
    Northwestern ED 1,072 out of 4,049 (26.5%)
    UVA EA (Total) 6,000 out of 21,573 (27.8%)(24.6% deferred)
    VIllanova Overall (RD+EA+ED) 6,545 out of 22,727 (28.8%)
    Hamilton ED1 191 out of 647 (29.5%) (includes 25 matched QuestBridge)
    Johns Hopkins ED 610 out of 2,037 (29.9%)
    UNC Chapel Hill EA (Total) 7,867 out of 25,867 (30.4%)
    Boston College EA 3,170 out of 10,350 (30.6%)
    Tulane ED 562 out of 1,819 (30.9%)
    Emory (Emory) ED1 503 out of ~1,623 (31%)
    Florida Overall 14,866 out of 40,849 (36.4%)
    Wesleyan ED1 279 out of 718 (38.9%)
    Emory (Emory and/or Oxford) ED1 726 out of > 1,700 (< 42.7%) (includes 30 matched QuestBridge)
    UVA EA (In State) 2,618 out of 5,897 (44.4%)
    Goorgia Overall (RD+EA) < 12,700 out of 26,500 (< 47.9%)
    UNC Chapel Hill EA (In State) 5,125 out of ~10,677 (48%)
    Santa Clara Overall (RD+ED) ~ 7,954 out of 16,233 (49%)
    Middlebury ED1 326 out of 650 (50.2%) (6% deferred, 43.8% denied)
    Georgia EA > 8,000 out of nearly 15,000 (> 53.3%)
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  • mom2jgdmom2jgd 50 replies0 threads Junior Member
    @margueriteburtzlaff I don't know that she could've done anything. It makes no sense whatsoever. At least she has some amazing options she and you should be proud of.
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  • margueriteburtzlaffmargueriteburtzlaff 6 replies0 threads New Member
    Thanks, I agree her profile is as competitive as most, which is why it's so frustrating. On volleyball, she could have committed but she wants neuroscience or bioengineering, and would like to be free to focus on academics.
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  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo 4896 replies388 threads Senior Member
    Occidental? Their announcement didn't have an admit rate.
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  • SAYSAY 940 replies5 threads Member
    marguerite all state at any sports means next to nothing if you don't use it as a recruited athlete. Many girls use it and quit after one season but then are in an IVY. It's far too competitive to think GPA's and stats will be enough. UVA and NC OOS are no surprise. Good luck on Vandy.
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  • AnotherCaDadAnotherCaDad 29 replies0 threads Junior Member
    Do a lot of highly qualified students from your public high school apply to the same schools? One of the more subtle factors to consider is that many colleges do not want a large cohort from one high school. They want a geographic diversity of student and seem to 'cap' admitted students at a proportional fraction of total applicants. In other words, if the average admit rate nationally is 10%, and 100 students from your high school apply, only 8-16 will be admitted even if 50 are highly qualified. This 'rule of thumb' appears to apply to public high schools but not to private schools or to magnet schools.

    If you are wondering why you received a 'no', look at the size of pool of strong applicants from your school
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  • wwjjdo94wwjjdo94 9 replies1 threads New Member
    edited March 2018
    @margueriteburtzlaff W&M notifies around March 31. My kid has 1560SAT, APPhysics& BCCalc +other APs, Eagle Scout, Co-captain of his team, job, blah blah blah -- applied to zero ivies and nowhere too crazy hard but one reach, yet rejected almost everywhere. Maybe we should have hired a consultant to massage his essay and make him look like something else... or maybe this just all starts to feels a little silly, or cultish -or both. He's going to college. YAY
    edited March 2018
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  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo 4896 replies388 threads Senior Member
    Wow. 13% for USC. Ouch.
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  • ClassOf2018PClassOf2018P 23 replies1 threads Junior Member
    As a Californian who has witnessed USC's rise over the past couple of decades, I'm in disbelief at this stat on its blog: "34% of admits have perfect un-weighted GPAs of 4.0; another 10% earned only one B in high school".

    I'm truly worried for all high achieving students who have to compete in this environment. So much for a kinder, gentler college admissions process that everyone seems to have wanted a couple of years ago?!
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  • ClassOf2018PClassOf2018P 23 replies1 threads Junior Member
    @wwjjdo94 I couldn't agree more with you more. While my D ultimately had a great outcome, so many parts of this process had her (and us) completely stumped and demoralized.
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  • YnotgoYnotgo 3880 replies58 threads Senior Member
    edited March 2018
    @ClassOf2018P And, if perfect 4.0s is something USC is looking for, it really puts high schools at a disadvantage if they pride themselves on grading hard.
    edited March 2018
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  • dragonmom3dragonmom3 407 replies14 threads Member
    At my kids' school an A- is considered very, very, good in an honors or AP class...there goes the 4.0...
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  • ClassOf2018PClassOf2018P 23 replies1 threads Junior Member
    edited March 2018
    Remember "Turning the Tide" initiative a few years ago where top colleges gathered to "reshape the college admissions process and promote greater ethical engagement among aspiring students, reduce excessive achievement pressure..."?

    What this year's stats will likely show is that we (the collective "we" including colleges, parents, high schools, etc.) will have made no progress in tide-turning.

    Kids and families continue to get more stressed, entire third-party industries proliferate to "game" the system for those who can pay, high schools changing how they grade/what they offer to fit college admissions priorities, colleges marketing to students who could never get into their schools and then touting record-breaking stats.... Where does the madness end?

    edited March 2018
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  • bronze2bronze2 253 replies5 threads Junior Member
    edited March 2018
    Some of the releases in statistics really shows how desirable and competitive the "more selective" colleges have become, now that the "elite" colleges are below 5%, below 10% in acceptance rates. E.g., from class of 2020 to class of 2022:

    Pomona 9.4% to 7.0% (25% increase in selectivity) - 765 offers down to 713 in 2022, for class size of ~412 (based on class of 2021);
    USC 16.6% to 12.9% - 9022 to 8258 offers (~3358 enroll);
    Northwestern 10.7% to 8.0% - 3743 to 3250 offers (~1903 enroll);
    Swarthmore 12.8% to 9.1% - 988 to 980 (~392 enroll);
    Williams 17.6% to 12.2% - 1230 to 1163 (~548 enroll);
    Colby 18.7% to 13.0% - 1840 to 1602 (~510 enroll);
    Tulane 25.5% to 17% - 8162 to 6600 (~1905 enroll);
    Wellesley 28.6% to 19.0% -1388 to 1267 (~605 enroll);
    BU 29.4% to 22% - 16907 to 14184 (~3498 enroll).

    Note number of offers for 2020 are from common data set, or for class of 2022, may be implied from announcements of acceptance rates which have been subject to rounding.

    The downward trend is no surprise since applicants keep increasing, but the rate has been rapid. What has been a surprise is the sharp decline in the number of offers or admits - which is the impact now being felt of ED2 and more use of ED generally, and of an overall increase in selectivity. It has become so much more of a seller's market. Yields will be going up this year, and there may not be much coming off waitlists.

    On the other hand, this trend also reflects and confirms the underlying desirability of many of the colleges below the "elites." The US has so many great schools that students can cast their search much broader - this is what we have consistently told our kids, heard from good college counselors and from many others. There was a big arbitrage with Stanford and Harvard at 5%, yet Wellesley and BU and Tulane at >25% -- but less of an arbitrage now. Unfortunately, the path has become tougher for this year's class for that point to be made.
    edited March 2018
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  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam 1886 replies1 threads Senior Member
    I think you guys are right in that it is crazier than ever trying to get into a top school (top 50 for argument's sake, or a
    certain top program within a school) but I think the bubble has burst a little and it's getting easier at the more midrange schools. There are less applicants. I also think acceptance rates at some schools are a bit skewed because of how they keep changing their ED/EA options.

    I also think the grade inflation issue is a bit of a problem. Definitely hurts the more rigorous schools that not only make it more difficult to take AP level classes, but if you are even allowed to take them the grading is harsh. This is especially problematic if the school doesn't rank (which so many don't!).

    I am surprised how little AP scores are taken into consideration in the application process. You can send your scores and they might be used in the application process but so many schools don't require them.
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  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan 12668 replies29 threads Senior Member
    @collegemomjam, schools don't require AP scores because many HS's in the US don't even offer AP classes, so it would be unfair to require them.

    But don't assume that they don't matter. Though it's all opaque. They certainly seem to matter more at some schools than others.
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