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too many extracurriculars?

scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
so for next year these will most likely (God willing) be my extracurriculars on my freshman college application (I wrote them vaguely on here to keep responses unbiased but they're all good for my major):

president of a club
vp of a club
internship
elementary school volunteer
blog writer

I want to start a certain club at our school so I would end up being president of that too and idk if that would look like all I do is school clubs (of course we would be actually accomplishing things in these clubs) or since my gpa is a 3.5 so colleges might think my grades are suffering bc im too busy and so idk if i should do it... like are two presidencies, a vice presidency, an internship, AND volunteering too much?

also my dream school has an acceptance rate of around 15% so maybe everyone has this many??????
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Replies to: too many extracurriculars?

  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    sorry if this sounds pretentious
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 32,994 Super Moderator
    It sounded fine until I got to this sentence:
    I want to start a certain club

    Starting a club to impress colleges is a very common activity. Admissions Officers will easily recognize the student who decided to start ta club to pad his/her resume.

    That being said, if there is a need, and you were truly interested in establishing the club to show leadership, tenacity, etc. then that's fine. At least you're doing something out of interest, and not to "impress" AOs.
  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    oh it wasnt to impress them i just want a club with a certain mission lol, sorry for confusion!
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 26,522 Senior Member
    It isn't about pres or vp titles, but what the EC does, how you actually gain relevant skills, do for others, stretch and have some impact. That's generally not just hs clubs. And though vol work with little kids is nice, it's not stretch. Nor is blogging.

    You need an idea of what a 15% college is looking for. A highly selective college will want to see you know the opportunities out there, and go for them.

    So, what's the possible major?
  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    polysci, all of the clubs are geared towards international skills/politics/social justice so i thought that would good
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 26,522 Senior Member
    edited February 13
    Honestly, poli sci and a 15% college screams to go further than just hs clubs with other hs kids. Do committed local work, get hands on experience in your community, get involved with local or regional advocacy, with seasoned adults. Not just the typical 'from afar,' talking amongst yourselves, writing letters or raising a few dollars. You need to look at the real efforts you can make and learn from, not just empathy. This is "show, not tell."

    You wouldn't believe how many poli sci wannabes never take that local leap. What else can you do?
  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    Thank you!
  • preppedparentpreppedparent Registered User Posts: 3,188 Senior Member
    Starting a club is fine especially if it is regarding a topic of significant importance to you and is part of a compelling story. Conventional wisdom suggests 7 ECs. Remember you are to list them in the order of importance to you, and you list any leadership roles as well as any awards you received. (Even though there is a separate Honors section). Ivies in particular like students with musical ability. Varsity sport would also help you diversify. Something interesting would make you more interesting. You get the idea.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 26,522 Senior Member
    edited February 13
    It's not raw musical or sports abilities- it's that actually using them requires commitment over years and allows for improvements/gains over time (at least, in theory.) You join orchestra or band, show up. You get to sports practice, do the team thing.

    You have to remember, they choose you, not the other way around. In that, it's like any competition. It's not simply what matters to the applicant, but how the info comes across as a reflection of the energies, level of thinking, and stretch the college wants to see. The most important thing *to you* may not be what matters to them, in the least. And you've got competition. The competitive colleges choose what they see as the right patterns.

    They like kids who branch out, in the right ways. (After all, they want you to come to campus and be open to new things.) They like kids who dig deeper into their interest fields. Just doing what's at the high school- or introducing a new club- may not represent the wider view the top colleges like to see.

    To some extent, this is about self-actualization, not simply self-satisfaction.

    OP has lots to gain from getting involved locally, learning how things work IRL, in the political or advocacy worlds, taking on even grunt work. That's so different than generic titles.

    "Interesting" still needs to be "show, not just tell." And relevant.

    Also OP, they'll look at your transcript, not just the GPA. It will matter what courses got less than A. Gym, maybe some elective, no issue.Humanities, maybe. But expanding your EC experiences is an opportunity to grow.

    Adding: I liken a lot of this to debate. You don't win in a competition because you had the title in your hs. Or because you spoke on a topic that means so very much to you. You win because you hit the bullets they expect, delivered the range of argument, and did it in the expected manner. Your actual performance, on stage.

  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 2,417 Senior Member
    OP: you might get some more detailed suggestions & others schools to target/consider if you shared which university is your dream school.

    Based on your posts, you need to increase your GPA & make sure that you take rigorous courses.
  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    edited February 13
    i understand that @lookingforward but ive read multiple times that leadership positions are important as well, whats ur opinion on that?
  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
  • scholarfromatlscholarfromatl Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    does anyone think it is a negative thing that I would be starting a club that starts my senior year? does that look bad since its late or it doesnt make a difference
  • preppedparentpreppedparent Registered User Posts: 3,188 Senior Member
    No, senior year is fine. Many seniors start something late. It is better however to show commitment to some cause and develop leadership in that area over a few years or even the last 2 years.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 26,522 Senior Member
    You could be involved with something outside the high school by March, show 6+ months of engagement, by fall (if applying early.) Or you can start something in Sept, be looking for a teacher partner, members, and maaaybe have done a meeting or two, maybe some action that has value. Or not. See the difference?

    No, a leader "title" isn't an "it." Imo, there should be some substance, some logic beyond your "interest." Some record. Not just listing founder and president.

    But this is your choice. It's about your thinking. I do not favor a new high school club over real experience.
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