Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

New to the College Admissions Arena? Learn These Key Terms

CCEdit_TorreyCCEdit_Torrey Editor Posts: 179 Editor
Dave Berry shares the lingo you'll need to know as you enter the college admissions process: https://www.collegeconfidential.com/articles/admissions-lingo-for-newbies/

Replies to: New to the College Admissions Arena? Learn These Key Terms

  • TheGreyKingTheGreyKing Forum Champion Williams College Posts: 1,951 Forum Champion
    edited February 19
    This is a good and helpful summary, but I was startled by this statement, which may have been a typing error in the original source (?):
    In many cases, applicants may apply EA to more than one college. However, if the applicant has applied Early Decision, s/he usually may not apply to other colleges EA, although there may be exceptions to this rule.

    This is not accurate for any college offering early decision that I have studied. All of the colleges I have read about that offer early decision allow you to apply early action to as many colleges as you like. But you may apply to only one early DECISION college. If you get accepted to the early decision college, you need to attend it unless the financial aid package is unacceptable. Upon your acceptance to the early decision college, you withdraw all pending applications and tell any colleges that already accepted you early action, “Thanks, but no thanks.”

    In fact, I strongly recommend that anyone applying early decision to a highly selective college also apply early action to some other colleges, including a safety college. Then, if you are deferred or rejected early decision, you will not be in agony waiting until March, because you will know that you have been accepted to a four year college!
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 74,419 Senior Member
    edited February 20
    In the linked article...
    Dave_Berry wrote:
    In many cases, applicants may apply EA to more than one college. However, if the applicant has applied Early Decision, s/he usually may not apply to other colleges EA, although there may be exceptions to this rule.

    Usually, if an applicant applies under ED, the ED college will prohibit the applicant from applying early elsewhere, although there may be exceptions to this rule.

    Although this seems to be a common belief on these forums, it does not appear to be correct for any ED school.

    It may be due to an erroneous assumption that most EA schools have some form of restrictive EA where the applicant agrees not to apply ED anywhere (and possibly other restrictions regarding other EA applications). But most schools with EA do not have such restrictions, and, for those that do, the restrictions come from those EA schools, not the ED school.
    Dave_Berry wrote:
    The EFC is calculated (for public schools) according to a federal-government methodology (via the FAFSA) and/or (for private colleges) by an institutional (college-specific) methodology (via the CSS Profile and, possibly, the college’s own financial aid form).

    It should not be assumed that public schools use FAFSA methodology to calculate EFC (note that some do use CSS Profile as well as FAFSA). Also, a private school could use FAFSA methodology if it chooses. The best way to estimate your EFC for a given school is to run that school's net price calculator.
    Dave_Berry wrote:
    The EFC amount is the difference between the college’s total annual student budget (tuition, room and board and any ancillary costs) and any school-provided financial aid (grants, loans, scholarships, work study, etc.).

    Not all schools will offer financial aid or scholarships covering the difference between their list prices and whatever EFC the school chooses to calculate. This can be particularly true for out-of-state state schools. Again, the best way to estimate net price after financial aid at a given school is to run that school's net price calculator.
Sign In or Register to comment.