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Is SAT 25th or 75th percentile a better indicator of how much schools care about the SAT (or ACT)?

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Replies to: Is SAT 25th or 75th percentile a better indicator of how much schools care about the SAT (or ACT)?

  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 31,967 Senior Member
    Theloniousmonk, I said "no guarantee," on my own. Ok? Strong stats are important, but no guarantee. Holistic. No matter if that's an 800, 750, or 700 (though that's creeping low for a tippy top.)

    No guarantee of your chances, no guarantee of the excellence of your record or application. Not sure why this is the 2nd time recently you ding me for saying something that is not a direct repsonse to a question (as if someone had asked for guarantees?) OP started trying to understand what seems to be an indicator of importance of scores. The links show top scores are...no guarantee.
  • Data10Data10 Registered User Posts: 2,828 Senior Member
    Also, Umich seems to one of the few to release the latest CDS and it seems to be 1330-1510(non-concorded), and a 30-34. Either the highest or second highest for a public school.
    It's probably the 2nd highest public, like it was last year. Using a weighted average based on percent submitting SAT and ACT, and an average of 25th and 75th, the highest scoring public colleges are below. Note that the SAT and ACT order are not consistent with each other. I'd expect this largely relates to in state vs out of state preference and varying ACT/SAT participation by state, which is another factor that can distort estimate score preference by SAT scores ranges.

    2017-18 Highest Test Score Publics
    1. GeorgiaTech: 30-34 ACT, 670-730 EBRW, 680-770 Math
    2 (tie). Michigan: 30-33 ACT, 660-730 EBRW, 670-770 Math
    2 (tie). Berkeley*: 29-34 ACT, 650-750 EBRW, 650-780 Math
    4. Virginia: 29-33 ACT, 660-740 EBRW, 650-760 Math
    5. William and Mary: 29-33 ACT, 660-740 EBRW, 640-740 Math
    *Berkeley reports stats differently in IPEDS and CDS, using CDS... lower with IPEDS

    2018-19 Highest Test Score Publics
    1. GeorgiaTech: 30-34 ACT, 640-730 EBRW, 690-790 Math
    2. Michigan: 30-34 ACT, 660-730 EBRW, 670-780 Math
    3 (tie). Berkeley*: 29-35 ACT, 660-750 EBRW, 670-750 Math
    3 (tie). Virginia: 30-34 ACT, 660-730 EBRW, 670-770 Math
    5. William and Mary: 30-33 ACT, 660-730 EBRW, 650-760 Math
    *Berkeley is "enrollment estimate as of 08/2018" and may be inaccurate

  • emorynavyemorynavy Registered User Posts: 398 Member
    Why is UCB's 25th lower than the others like that?
  • Jedelm23Jedelm23 Registered User Posts: 106 Junior Member
    @emorynavy #17 said the second data set for Berkeley was a projection and might be off while the first data set was apparently reported differently so they might have messed it up.
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 9,835 Senior Member
    edited March 3
    @emorynavy wrote:
    Why is UCB's 25th lower than the others like that?

    Wouldn't the most likely answer be that the figure represents the scores attained by the students who attend Berkeley?

    https://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=Berkeley&s=all&id=110635#admsns
  • emorynavyemorynavy Registered User Posts: 398 Member
    For perspective
    2018-2019
    Emory: 31-34, 660-730 EBRW, 690-790 Math
    UCLA: 28-34, 640-740 EBRW, 630-780 Math
    Williams: 32-35, 710-760 EBRW, 700-790 Math
    CMC: 31-34, 670-730 EBRW, 680-770 Math
    Cornell: 32-34, 680-750 EBRW, 710-790 Math
  • emorynavyemorynavy Registered User Posts: 398 Member
    @merc81
    Well yea, I was wondering why it was a bit lower.
    Also what you posted is for 2017-2018 , not 2018-2019.
  • evergreen5evergreen5 Registered User Posts: 1,375 Senior Member
    edited March 3
    UCs have a reputation for more heavily weighting gpa than test scores, yes? An additional weirdness for UCB: The UCB 2017-2018 CDS for class of 2021 (enrolled fall 2017) has EBRW 650-750, math 650-780, while what should be the exact same data (enrolled fall 2017) at NCES is EBRW 630-720, math 630-760. What am I missing?
  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 Registered User Posts: 1,579 Senior Member
    edited March 3
    What am I missing?

    Not sure what the difference could be.... but some ideas.....UCB may have updated the CDS multiple times, which IPEDS may not reflect. Or UCB's CDS could be incorrect.
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 9,835 Senior Member
    edited March 3
    Yes, I'm seeing what are seeing, @evergreen5, and agree with @Mwfan1921's conjecture.

    (Edited to reflect reply #41.)
  • evergreen5evergreen5 Registered User Posts: 1,375 Senior Member
    @merc81 Funny, I typed 750 first, and then when I looked again, I saw 760, so I edited. https://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=Berkeley&s=all&id=110635#admsns
  • TheSATTeacherTheSATTeacher Registered User Posts: 144 Junior Member
    I wouldn't read too much into these things. A lot of factors can influence these numbers. For instance, I imagine that Stanford's lower 25th percentile is largely attributable to the number of student athletes Stanford has. Stanford puts a greater emphasis on athletics than many peer schools and as such may have more recruited athletes and/or more recruited athletes with lower test scores. Other factors, such as how much a school values diversity, legacies, etc., can also play a role.

    There is simply too much complexity behind these numbers to tell a simple story about how much a given school values the SAT. It is also difficult to even speak of how much a given school values SAT scores because any two admissions officers at a given school will likely value the SAT to different degrees.

    Practically speaking, you should aim for the school's 75th percentile. If you are up in the 75th percentile, your score is certainly good enough for that school. For most applicants, the bottom 25 percent is pretty irrelevant to consider, as most applicants are not recruited athletes, underrepresented minorities, development cases, etc.
  • Data10Data10 Registered User Posts: 2,828 Senior Member
    edited March 3
    UCs have a reputation for more heavily weighting gpa than test scores, yes? An additional weirdness for UCB: The UCB 2017-2018 CDS for class of 2021 (enrolled fall 2017) has EBRW 650-750, math 650-780, while what should be the exact same data (enrolled fall 2017) at NCES is EBRW 630-720, math 630-760. What am I missing?
    The specific number of test takers differ slightly between IPEDS/NCES and CDS, so something likely changed between these 2 dates. IPEDS/NCES is very similar to Berkeley's "enrollment estimate as of 10/2017" I suspect that IPEDS/NCES is an estimate made near this date, while the CDS states a much later date -- "update 8/9/2018."

    It's probably not a big issue at Berkeley, but at many colleges there is a big difference between the score range of those who commit to enroll and the score range of those who actually do enroll and show up for classes. Financial issues is a common reason for failing to attend after committing to enroll -- https://www.newsday.com/opinion/commentary/college-bound-summer-1.19031641 . Some also withdraw midway through the fall semester, which can lead to an ambiguous definition.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 3,254 Senior Member
    Still that's a significant difference between those who commit to enroll and those who show up. I cant imagine that you have more than a few percent who don't show up, and since the average drops at that point they were mostly on the high end of the scorers.
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