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Feds uncover admissions test cheating plot

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Replies to: Feds uncover admissions test cheating plot

  • PetraMCPetraMC 710 replies5 postsRegistered User Member
    edited May 21
    I don't think any of us are talking about legitimate LD students. *That* would likely be a stigma at my children's very competitive high school, while extra time for a better score is generally not.*


    *I'm not arguing this is right!
    edited May 21
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33093 replies358 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 21
    School or the social life?

    Btw, legit accommodations adds time. It's not easier.
    edited May 21
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  • sushirittosushiritto 3659 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 21
    Olivia wants to go back to school (USC), per that noted news source, US Weekly.

    Hey why not? It's USC. Worth a shot.
    edited May 21
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 26655 replies174 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    ^^agree with letter. Extra time on the ACT is yuuuggggge as the problems are more straight forward than the SAT.
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  • merc81merc81 10152 replies151 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    In terms of scandal, this story has it all: people I'd never heard of, a TV show I've never watched, and colleges I mostly don't pay too much attention to.
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  • menloparkmommenloparkmom 12453 replies537 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    " It's USC. Worth a shot. "
    Ha Ha Ha Ha!
    sorry Olivia- hate to break it to you but that is NOT going to happen!
    she will be accepted back at USC only when hell freezes over!
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  • menloparkmommenloparkmom 12453 replies537 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 21
    “She wants to come out LOOKING like she’s changed, learned life lessons and is growing as a person, so she for sure WANTS people to THINK she is interested in her education.”

    wow. just wow! the ignorant hubris of the rich and stupid.
    edited May 21
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  • privatebankerprivatebanker 5090 replies72 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @merc81 agree with all the points except the schools themselves. Yale Georgetown Stanford USC. Pretty big names in the old collegiate industrial complex.

    Add in Penn with the hoops coach and Harvard with the fencing issue.

    Obviously the cheaters are to blame. But for these pretty average candidates to get accepted to these schools underscores the importance of the hook as a difference maker. Obscure sport. In. Race preference. In. High profile but non revenue sport like water polo and track. In.
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  • merc81merc81 10152 replies151 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @privatebanker: Yes, I overstated that about the colleges. I can see how this group of schools might hold particular interest for many people.
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  • goddess00goddess00 15 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    In 2017-18 over 13% of public schools had kids on IEPS. Data on IEPs and 504 plan come from different sources. Most recent numbers on accommodations show that 1.5% of students were served solely by 504 plans but that data is relatively dated from school year 2011-2012. 504 plans would equate to accommodations at elite privates most tightly as 504 is reasonable accommodations in the general classroom. Top test in publics (TJ, Stuyvesant etc) would likely equate to privates because a kid with an IEP is unlikely to be able to do the academic work at either. Top publics would likely have a mix of wealthy parents willing to buy accommodations and still have legitimate kids with the need for an IEP.
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  • gwnorthgwnorth 357 replies6 postsRegistered User Member
    @goddess00 wrote:
    Top test in publics (TJ, Stuyvesant etc) would likely equate to privates because a kid with an IEP is unlikely to be able to do the academic work at either.
    You seem to be equating IEP and intellectual challenge. The point of the accommodations is to mitigate the challenge allowing the student to be able to do academic work at the level of their intellectual ability. My younger son is both gifted and has an LD. The accommodations he is entitled to as outlined in is IEP are designed to mitigate his LD so that he can work to his full potential. It's hard to do that if you are spending extra time and energy compensating for your challenge. Once addressed he is more than capable of handling advanced academic work. In his case it's become less of an issue now that he is older, but that doesn't mean it no longer exists. If it weren't for modern technology though school would much more of a struggle for him. Thankfully much of his work is now done on computer.
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  • goddess00goddess00 15 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    @gwnorth you are absolutely correct-that is an important clarification. Most kids with IEP have significant impediments to learning and academic success. 504 is accommodations in a general classroom.
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  • northwestynorthwesty 3415 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    "College test anxiety may get you more time, but you still need to know the material. It's not like those kids only get the easy half of a test."

    When it comes to actually doing in college, the real issue for many LD kids is that the school can't give you more than 168 hours in a week. So an LD kid in a very challenging school or program often has to grind a lot harder than their classmates.

    Getting some extra time on tests is fair and helpful, but isn't all that big of a deal.

    A good solution to the accommodation issue would be to design tests that don't rely all that much on time pressure. Most tasks in life aren't like the ACT.

    And the biggest problem is not higher SES kids getting accommodations that are marginal or not deserved at all. The big unfairness is the large numbers of lower SES kids who deserve accommodations but who don't get them due the time and expense and parental activism required.
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 26655 replies174 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 23
    Most tasks in life aren't like the ACT.

    Or the SAT, or LSAT or the MCAT or the GRE....
    Getting some extra time on tests is fair and helpful, but isn't all that big of a deal.

    Un-needed (not really LD, but purchased a certificate) extra time on the ACT is huge, particularly for the math and science sections.
    A good solution to the accommodation issue would be to design tests that don't rely all that much on time pressure.

    Not cost effective, so not a realistic "solution".
    edited May 23
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  • yearstogoyearstogo 638 replies28 postsRegistered User Member
    DS does math competitions and extra time is HUGE!
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  • northwestynorthwesty 3415 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 23
    "Not cost effective, so not a realistic "solution"."

    Very easy and cheap actually.

    Give everyone 6 hours for the ACT instead of four. That would eliminate the vast majority of accommodations (since the most typical accommodation sought and received is 1.5X time).

    While the raw scores might change due to the lessened time pressure, the top 1% of scores will still be the 99th percentile.

    Done!
    edited May 23
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33093 replies358 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 23
    6 hours is a burden for some. Our GC advised parents that sitting 4 hours instead of 3 is no favor, if you don't truly need it.

    In my day, we sat for Iowa Tests from about 2nd grade on, not sure if every year or every other, through maybe 6th. Something in jr and sr high. Many kids today have never sat for even a 3 hour test.
    edited May 23
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