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The best college admissions advice-from colleges themselves!

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Replies to: The best college admissions advice-from colleges themselves!

  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff Registered User Posts: 2,948 Senior Member
    This is my favorite admissions blog. I like his humor even if they did wait list then reject my son.. Lol... Which more families read it. https://pwp.gatech.edu/admission-blog/
  • gardenstategalgardenstategal Registered User Posts: 5,216 Senior Member
    @inthegarden , I don't think a kid has to stand out with what they do. Every kid has the ability to stand out based on who they are and/or how they see themselves in the world. There are kids out there who stand out for that.

  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 31,967 Senior Member
    edited May 10
    I think you can rest assured that it's how you go for what you do go for, what those choices are. Not just being dependent on what the hs offers, when they offer it, following friends.

    Think of an adcom writing, "She stands out for xxx." Maybe that's thoughtful qualities, or being willing to try new (relevant) things, or get out of the comfort zone, etc. It's not about winning an award or some odd things.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 31,967 Senior Member
    Love that word, MoM17. It says so much.
  • Johnny523Johnny523 Registered User Posts: 55 Junior Member
    Though how the heck anyone who hasn’t visited the school can decide it’s the one and only, I don’t understand, but yes, it happens.

    Back in the olden days of the 70s and 80s, lots of people never visited schools they applied to and ultimately attended. But then the whole admissions thing wasn't anything like the craziness it is today.
  • Johnny523Johnny523 Registered User Posts: 55 Junior Member
    MIT’s classic “Apply Sideways” should be required reading for every high-aiming student. https://mitadmissions.org/blogs/entry/applying_sideways/

    I never saw this before. I love the final paragraph.
  • whidbeyite2002whidbeyite2002 Registered User Posts: 137 Junior Member
    @momofsenior1, I read the JHU “Essays That Worked” after my daughter was accepted. I loved that! Also, I appreciated JHU’s focus on collaboration in this year’s supplement.
  • whidbeyite2002whidbeyite2002 Registered User Posts: 137 Junior Member
  • Andrew2199Andrew2199 Registered User Posts: 59 Junior Member
    As one of several lectures/discussions offered at my recent college reunion (Grinnell), the admissions office hosted an advice session for parents of children in the college search process. It was full of helpful tips but what stood out to me was a discussion of characteristics and attributes they look for in students along with red flags.

    Look For:
    - Academic risks
    - Adventurous
    - Articulate
    - Great recommendations
    - Committed
    - Speaks up

    Big Red Flags:
    - Negative recommendations
    - Not hard worker
    - Downward academic progress
    - Easy courses/always in comfort zone/no big challenges
    - Bad interview

    Many of these items were not surprising, but I was surprised by how much they emphasized academic risk taking.
  • NYC2018nycNYC2018nyc Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    agree! In #27 they say they want academic risks, but then they put a big red flag if someone has downward academic progress. So do you take that extra challenging AP class? Or not? Or only if you know you can get a 5?
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 31,967 Senior Member
    If they want success in rigor, there you have it. It's not just taking the class.

    Drop down in rigor to get an A and maybe you're not their type. But this refinment really only applies to the more competitive colleges, those with so many highly competitive applicants that they can be choosey.
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