right arrow
PARENTS4PARENTS is a new initiative aimed at highlighting the vast expertise of our parents community while helping other parents better navigate the college admissions process. aggies1989 is a UC alumnus and parent of two UC college kids. ASK HIM ANYTHING!
GUEST STUDENT OF THE WEEK: fintech3753 is a current student at the Wharton School. Majoring in finance, he is hoping to pursue a career at the intersection of finance and technology. ASK HIM ANYTHING!
Make sure to check out our August Checklist for HS Seniors. Consult these quick resources to get you started on the process this month.
As we work to adjust to the current reality, make sure to check out these dedicated COVID-19 resources: our directory of virtual campus tours, our directory of extended deadlines, as well as the list of schools going test optional this fall.

Seven College Admissions Myths

CCEdit_TorreyCCEdit_Torrey 36 replies353 threads Editor
Dave Berry breaks down seven commonly-held myths about admissions: https://www.collegeconfidential.com/articles/seven-college-admissions-myths/
12 replies
· Reply · Share

Replies to: Seven College Admissions Myths

  • collegenut231collegenut231 6 replies1 threads New Member
    So if you make $100K some how you’re not as economically disadvantaged and you should go into debt?
    · Reply · Share
  • CU123CU123 3724 replies77 threads Senior Member
    Unfortunately yes, however you should only occur about 80K in debt at that income level if the university meets full need without loans.
    · Reply · Share
  • StPaulDadStPaulDad 598 replies4 threads Member
    Honestly donut-hole families won't get the same range of options others may have. I live in MN and my cost of living is significantly lower than someone from DC or NYC or SF, and that's before considering any financial choices either of us might make. If the EFC formula leaves you with a big gap and financial aid is vital then you have to start adjusting expectations.

    That said, being a Top Student can be a matter of context: if you're a good enough student you can shop your way down the prestige pecking order until you find a school that thinks you're the bees knees and will give you money to attend their institution. It's not as awesome as getting a ride to Princeton, but if a golden ticket Presidential Scholarship to St MiddleRank College makes school affordable then it's better than two years of CC and hoping the family money situation improves by junior year. Life isn't always fair, but it's not always an all or nothing situation.
    · Reply · Share
  • usma87usma87 518 replies3 threads Member
    @collegenut231 - if you live in California and want to go to a UC, the threshold seems even lower to get any aid. One DS was awarded Regents Scholarship at a UC, and it was still more expensive (net) than Notre Dame. I'm so happy I pay taxes so I can get no aid at in-state flagships.
    · Reply · Share
  • studentlyfstudentlyf 1 replies0 threads New Member
    Yes, private colleges are good but some have finance constraint due to which they cannot afford it.
    · Reply · Share
  • askdedminaskdedmin 4 replies0 threads New Member
    A good article to read on, College advisor makes the process of the college admissions journey easier.
    · Reply · Share
  • askdedminaskdedmin 4 replies0 threads New Member
    does College ranking affect College Admissions? When It comes to the college selection, ranking is not only criteria that parents or students have put on. It depends on student priorities which college is better to get admitted.
    · Reply · Share
  • MWolfMWolf 2799 replies14 threads Senior Member
    @usma87 Unfortunately, it is because the Great State of California, in it's infinite wisdom, has decided to tax you less, and put less of the money they get into the UC system (2.7% of its budget, down from about 5% in the 1990s), they cannot afford to provide much aid. CA government spending per student is 37% of what it was in the 1990s (adjusted for inflation, etc), while tuition is about 2.4x higher, which does not compensate. Overall, the UCs only have about 77% of the money, per student, to spend as they did in the early 1990s, since tuition has not been increased at the rate that would be required to actually bring spending per student up to what it was in the early 1990s.

    So, yes, your taxes pay for the UCs. Unfortunately, because of the demand to pay less tax, the UCs can not afford to provide much financial aid based on the taxes that you are now paying. They can barely afford to maintain the level of teaching, and have resorted to replacing actual professors who stay for a long time, do research (which students can join), and can enforce standards with contingent labor - adjuncts who are hired per semester, paid a pittance, are dependent of student evaluations for their continued employment, and as such cannot enforce standards, don't have time, space, funding, or any support for research, etc.

    However, cheer up, since, due to the "wonderful" tax cuts of the 1990s and early 2000s, you are paying about a few hundred dollars a year less in state income taxes!!
    · Reply · Share
  • usma87usma87 518 replies3 threads Member
    @MWolf - Wow, we pay less taxes? Nope. Our tax dollars get diverted for a wide range of crackpot pet projects (High speed rail? and state employee pensions). How is it that a low tax state like Arizona offers me a better deal to a state flagship than UCs? Hmmmm, I think it is the political difference in where the tax dollars are invested.
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83929 replies745 threads Senior Member
    usma87 wrote: »
    @MWolf - Wow, we pay less taxes? Nope. Our tax dollars get diverted for a wide range of crackpot pet projects (High speed rail? and state employee pensions).

    Don't forget prisons. The crime wave that peaked in 1991 (thanks, Ethyl Corporation) produced lots of criminals, and the reaction of longer sentencing like the "three strikes" law in 1994 greatly increased the demand for prison space and hence spending on prisons.
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83929 replies745 threads Senior Member
    edited September 2019
    usma87 wrote: »
    if you live in California and want to go to a UC, the threshold seems even lower to get any aid.

    Based on NPCs, parental income up to around $120k may still get financial aid grants at UCs. This is higher than the median household income ($72k) and median family income ($82k).
    edited September 2019
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity