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How do top colleges view OnRamps vs. AP classes

micalcbac22micalcbac22 1 replies2 threadsRegistered User New Member
I'm currently in High School and wondering how Ivy and other top-tier universities view OnRamps in comparison to AP classes, and if any will accept the credits. For those who are unfamiliar, students in OnRamps classes "earn college credit through the UT Austin college course receive a college transcript along with separate high school credit and a high school transcript." I understand that it's similar to Dual Credit/Enrollment, but since the classes are offered through UT Austin (a "public ivy") does that make them appear as or more rigorous than AP classes?
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Replies to: How do top colleges view OnRamps vs. AP classes

  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 29248 replies57 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    AP is the gold standard for curriculum rigor. It takes an Admission Counsrlor a glance of the eye to see if s student took the Core classes in APs offered by their school. That very simplicity makes it preferable.

    There are thousands, tens of thousands of other college classes a student can take these days. Some are DE through a school program—notice how you had to explain what in the flock of programs OnRamps is because you probably know most people won’t have a clue. UT- Austin’s Admissions Officers likely know. It’s probably explained inntge school Profile included with your application, something your GZC will send to the colleges. I suggest you ask to get a copy of that so you can personally read exactly what an admissions office will be reading.

    If this program is the way students at your high school are able to get the most rigorous courses, than that’s the way it’s viewed. If a kid in another school, has a community college as his access to the most rigorous courses, those CC courses are given every bit the same weight as your courses. AOs don’t sit there and assess the college quality in DE courses. These days kids find ways to take courses at the top colleges in the country —Harvard, Stanford etc have programs specifically for this. It’s nice to have them on the resume especially for those kids whose high school is limited. It shows going above and beyond to seek challenging academic settings. If you are at a school ride with AP courses available, not do much. Every year top students are disappointed that all those years of taking Harvard summer courses did not gain them entry into Harvard even with those professors giving them LORs
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  • skieuropeskieurope 38873 replies6866 threadsSuper Moderator Super Moderator
    I know nothing about OnRamp, but it sounds exactly like DE to me. Top-tier universities, particularly privates, don't give credit for college course that also receive HS credit, and rarely give credit for college courses that don't give HS credit if taken before HS graduation. But check the credit policies of your target colleges.

    In terms of rigor, it depends upon the course. In general, DE courses, whether though a CC or the state flagship, will be seen as equal rigor to AP courses, but some college courses are lightweight, and AOs will be able to assess that.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 17
    It also depends on which college courses you take in high school. College calculus 1 + 2 and AP calculus BC would cover similar material, for example. However, college precalculus would cover lower level material, while college multivariable calculus would cover higher level material. Some high school students take college courses because they are already advanced past the level which AP courses cover.

    Taking an actual college course at a college while in high school will also let you sample how a college course operates, in terms of needing more self-management in contrast to the much more highly supervised environment of high school. Some college frosh have difficulty with this change all at once when starting college, so it may be helpful to have experienced it on a small scale while in high school.
    edited August 17
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  • micalcbac22micalcbac22 1 replies2 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Thanks for all the responses! Our school offers both Dual credit and OnRamps, but the Dual credit is done through a local community college and I'm not even sure if it's weighted, whereas OnRamps is weighted the same as an AP class, and the assignments/tests are graded by a UT Austin professor. I was planning on taking Pre-cal and Physics OnRamps, but I might switch Physics back to AP after reading this.
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  • SATXMom2SATXMom2 31 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited August 17
    Texas students here with OnRamps experience. AP Physics I OnRamps and AP Physics 1 are considered equal classes at our school... Your choice. The OnRamps class has additional UT requirements (homework AND tests) and comes with the option of receiving a grade on your UT transcript or just pass/fail. my student opted to go for the graded UT credit and chose not to take the AP test as the class has a slightly different focus than the AP exam. She will take Physics C this year and will take the AP exam.

    As for rigorousness, OnRamps is probably more rigorous based on the workload. For our school district is still carries the highest weighted grades just like the AP classes.

    If you are planning to take the AP Physics 1 exam, ask your teacher if you will be prepared for the exam or will need to additional outside studying... then make your decision.

    edited August 17
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 17
    https://onramps.utexas.edu/ says that OnRamps is dual enrollment through UT Austin using a distance education model with some supervision by a high school teacher (i.e. not really the same as the environment of an in person college course). Note that a student taking an OnRamps course may receive a high school grade and a college grade that are different from each other.

    The UT Austin OnRamps courses are listed here: https://onramps.utexas.edu/resources/transcripts/#table . It looks like none of them are higher than college frosh or AP level, and some of them are lower level (college algebra and precalculus).
    edited August 17
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