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Will applying for computer science as a major hinder my chances of getting in?

KnightZKnightZ 0 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
Hello, so I'm in a little dilemma in which I've had the passion for computer science, but have been indecisive about it therefore not taking any computer science classes or being involved with computer science related activities such as clubs. I'm currently a senior and have taken AP/honors classes and am also taking AP Calculus, AP English Lit, AP Econ, and AP Bio this year.
My question is should I apply as a computer science major and try and work my resume by getting involved with clubs and taking AP Computer Science Principles? Or should I apply as a different major and try to get in that way and then transfer into the computer science program?
I heard transfering into an engineering major like computer science can be difficult and somewhat impossible depending on the college. But I also don't want the college to seem that I'm applying to major in computer science for no reason since it doesn't entirely match my resume.
P.S I know for a fact that I want to major in Computer Science, so I'm not undecided.
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Replies to: Will applying for computer science as a major hinder my chances of getting in?

  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 12735 replies235 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I know for a fact that I want to major in Computer Science, so I'm not undecided.

    If the college requires you to declare a major when you apply, then apply to CS. Many colleges don't require that, though, and expect you to try a few things and declare a major sophomore year.
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  • Groundwork2022Groundwork2022 2102 replies31 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    You should focus on applying to colleges that don't require you to declare a major up front. Fibbing about your major can backfire, as you may find yourself accepted into a college but shut out of the CS major.
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 6989 replies49 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    There are many of schools where CS is in the college of engineering where there is a common first year curriculum, and then a transition to major after freshman year. This type of set up may make more sense for you.

    I agree that if you are targeting a school that you need to apply to CS up front, do it. It's becoming increasingly difficult to transfer into CS from other majors and many schools.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    There are many of schools where CS is in the college of engineering where there is a common first year curriculum, and then a transition to major after freshman year. This type of set up may make more sense for you.

    However, at some of these schools, going from undeclared engineering to a specific major may be competitive, depending on the major's popularity.
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  • coolguy40coolguy40 2086 replies2 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    If you want to study CS, then I would put it down as your major of choice. It sounds like the school has a hyper-competitive CS program, so they're choosing most of their candidates out of high school. If that's the case, don't try to get in from the outside, because you could get burned and be forced to transfer somewhere else.

    Instead, you want to focus on a variety of schools. I would recommend focusing on schools that DON'T force you to declare a major on the college application. This way you have a fair chance of getting the major you want because all students are treated the same.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    coolguy40 wrote: »
    Instead, you want to focus on a variety of schools. I would recommend focusing on schools that DON'T force you to declare a major on the college application. This way you have a fair chance of getting the major you want because all students are treated the same.

    Actually, there are lots of schools where frosh applicants are not required to apply to specific majors, but where frosh applicants who do enter undeclared may find that some majors are already "full" with frosh who did apply directly to those majors.

    In addition, even if all or most frosh enter as undeclared, some majors may be so popular relative to department capacity that getting into such majors requires a very high college GPA or very competitive admission process.
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  • mikemacmikemac 10306 replies150 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I've had the passion for computer science, but have been indecisive about it therefore not taking any computer science classes or being involved with computer science related activities such as clubs.
    If you've had a passion for CS but haven't taken any classes, joined any clubs, done any projects on your own, then perhaps you should reflect on whether this is truly a passion or just chasing the current hot field (the way so many kids a decade or so back posting here were planning to go into consulting or work on Wall Street, they hadn't quite decided which yet).
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  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 12735 replies235 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    mikemac wrote: »
    I've had the passion for computer science, but have been indecisive about it therefore not taking any computer science classes or being involved with computer science related activities such as clubs.
    If you've had a passion for CS but haven't taken any classes, joined any clubs, done any projects on your own, then perhaps you should reflect on whether this is truly a passion or just chasing the current hot field (the way so many kids a decade or so back posting here were planning to go into consulting or work on Wall Street, they hadn't quite decided which yet).

    It is not unusual for CS kids (especially from certain groups) to not have done those things in high school. I have one who did zero CS before college and is a software engineer.

    That said, of course CS is booming right now. It may or may not be right for OP. Ideally the college makes it easy to explore the first year or two then declare.
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