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Naviance vs Common Data Set -- ED and College List

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Replies to: Naviance vs Common Data Set -- ED and College List

  • privatebankerprivatebanker 5330 replies77 threads Senior Member
    @homerdog I didn’t look up the numbers but up here in New England, you better ED to midd unless you have an admissions preference of some sort - statistically speaking.

    Of course there is the occasional outlier, but that is the consensus backed up by observation.
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  • helpingmom40helpingmom40 87 replies5 threads Junior Member
    D’s school uses Naviance and we are also using a private admissions consultant. She is looking at small LACs. It is really interesting because the private consultant compares D to the CDS and says she is “doing everything right” in terms of test scores, rigor, ECs, etc but they aren’t in a position to predict results. High school GC sees the historical data from past years from our school and says she is “doing everything right” and, while he can’t predict results, he does say the AO for our region has been the same for the first and second choice schools for the time Naviance has been in use and he has been at the school. Private consultant admits GC has a slight advantage because he knows what relationship they have with the college.

    Historical data shows each of the top 2 choices accepting 1-2 students from our school every year, regardless of the number of applications. D’s stats are well aligned with other accepted students from our school but with such small admit rates, you never know.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 34452 replies380 threads Senior Member
    edited September 16
    Just wait until the hs down the street, ignored for a few years, unexpectedly puts forth a crop of great applicants and the college says, "Hmm, this year, let's pay attention to *them." And maybe they adjust the slots from your hs. Naviance is a look back, not a solid predictor.
    edited September 16
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  • homerdoghomerdog 5190 replies96 threads Senior Member
    edited September 16
    @lookingforward I agree. One doesn’t see the whole picture on Naviance and kids need to know what the school wants. I still think colleges have relationships or don’t have relationships with any given high school. Honestly, S19 was a very good match in every way for Williams specifically. Talented in art and very advanced in math. And all of those other schools thought he fit the rural, outdoorsy LAC mold. He showed interest and his interview went super long and the alum even followed up after the decision to ask if he would consider taking the WL spot. In the end, he did not. But again, that was the WL history from our high school even though it really seemed like he was a strong match for Midd.

    The OP should talk to guidance. See if they have any insight at all. I would, however, not count on enthusiastic AOs or alums as a hint about whether the student will get in or not.

    I think this situation stinks. A friend of mine’s daughter really wants to apply to X school but our school never gets anyone in (it’s not an LAC but a top ten uni) and they are thinking that she shouldn’t risk it either. It’s all well and good to say that we don’t know other kids’ essays or recs but, if the school had 20+ kids apply and no one gets in with high stats, that college is not interested in that high school. Some of those kids should have been able to get in.

    @privatebanker I’m sure people would say that unhooked kids have to apply ED to all top LAcs not just Midd. But S19 got into a handful RD. Bowdoin was probably something like 7 percent acceptance rate RD. Might be helpful if we know what school the OP is talking about.
    edited September 16
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  • CU123CU123 3607 replies69 threads Senior Member
    I doubt your GC will be much help since it’s a public school. Were all the other rejections RD? ED is a powerful tool in signaling interest. DD was only one from her school (and actually her school district) to be admitted to her top 10 school. She was also the only one to apply ED. Around 30 applied RD. My opinion is that your son should apply ED to his reach school.
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  • NYC2018nycNYC2018nyc 201 replies10 threads Junior Member
    Yes, I had the same question in reverse. There are some schools that just sort of like S20's high school. According to naviance, he is well within the green dots. According to CDS it seems more like a match. Hoping naviance is right and the AO's like his school.
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  • wisteria100wisteria100 4216 replies47 threads Senior Member
    Small schools are challenging because there’s just so few spots for unhooked kids. But if your naviance shows 1 out of 16 kids getting in over 3 years and the school has a 10% admit rate, that doesn’t necessarily mean the school doesn’t like your high school. That means that playing the averages, 1.6 acceptances would have been a reasonable assumption, which means it either 1 kid or 2 kids. Now if 50 kids had applied and they took 1, that’s a different story. If it truly is the #1 choice, ED and perhaps have an ED2 plan in place.
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  • homerdoghomerdog 5190 replies96 threads Senior Member
    @NYC2018nyc I bet that’s good info. Again, Naviance was correct for S19 in a positive way too. Two schools with less than 20 percent acceptance rate on S19’s list did not deny any student at our school over a certain GPA/SAT. S19 was in that section of the graph and got in. People on CC kept saying these two schools couldn’t be considered matches or safeties because of the acceptance rate but I felt confident that he would get in.

    It’s the one thing I want to tell all of the kids on CC when they want to be “chanced”. Kids have got to look at the colleges’ history with their school. Get as much detail as you can about the most recent group of kids who applied and who got in. And yes I know. We don’t know everything. But, even at our giant high school, the top 50 kids know each other pretty darn well. It’s not that hard to know who got good recs from teachers since these kids tend to be in the same classes. And they all know each other’s ECs. Very rarely is there some surprise when someone gets in somewhere.
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  • cypresspatcypresspat 352 replies8 threads Member
    @CU123 Your blanket statement that public school GCs are irrelevant is not true in the case of my son’s public HS, where each GC has only 30 or so seniors to work with. My S20 has had a total of 11 hours of one-on-one meetings with his GC for his college list development, and we, his parents, 4 hours. Never mind the several group meetings the GCs have with their junior or senior cohorts for after-high-school plans. We couldn’t be more impressed with the attention our son has received. My friends with kids in the local private schools, they tell me, are not nearly as pleased as we lowly public high school parents are.
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  • AlmostThere2018AlmostThere2018 1355 replies50 threads Senior Member
    Great thread. I think it comes down to really strong essays that show how your student is a great match, understands its vibe, etc. Personal and compelling. Then add a lot of demonstrated interest. I like the suggestion of having your guidance counselor call the college to see what they can learn. Your student should show up on admissions webinars, reach out to the college's AO with questions, interview if it's avail, etc. Get on the college's radar.

    Finally, this is a bit obvious, emphasize some ECs where they'd be able to plug into the campus. For example, my high stats student, who got accepted to several T20 LACs in RD a couple years ago, emphasized how she wanted to get involved with newspaper. Make it easy for them to check some boxes on what they need for well-rounded student body.
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  • CU123CU123 3607 replies69 threads Senior Member
    edited September 17
    @cypresspat Well there is always the exception, don’t know of too many public high schools with just 30 seniors.... at my high school the GC’s were there to just try and keep the bottom of the class from dropping out, same for my DDs school, nice to have the privilege of a small high school.
    edited September 17
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  • homerdoghomerdog 5190 replies96 threads Senior Member
    @CU123 @cypresspat said each GC has 30 seniors. Not that there were 30 seniors total. Our giant high school also has a lot of GCs. Some are better than others. They each have 50 seniors but many of them are easy to help applying to only rolling schools where they are pretty much guaranteed admission. I would guess that each GC has maybe ten kids who are looking at top schools.
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  • CU123CU123 3607 replies69 threads Senior Member
    edited September 17
    Stand corrected, but that is a way better ratio then most high schools. Must be a wealthy neighborhood.
    edited September 17
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5833 replies10 threads Senior Member
    We found Naviance very helpful. But you already know that your son's ACT score will put him in the "seriously consider" pile at any school. The GPA is tougher because those don't compare well from school to school but he won't get tossed for his stats.

    With Naviance, it's impossible to know if the kid who was accepted had a hook. Your best shot is to apply ED if it's your first choice and you are comfortable with the EFC or are FP.

    FWIW, We heard a lot of these stories during senior year -- "only 4 kids from our school get into Penn every year" "Nobody ever gets into Bowdoin from our school ". "Harvard only admits legacies from our school." Yet somehow 6 kids were heading off to Penn and 3 were admitted to Bowdoin while the kid going to Harvard was from a family with no connection to the school.

    One NESCAC school had a new director of admissions who seemed to really like kids from our school whereas his predecessor seemed unenthusiastic. (Was that the difference or was it the kids? Or the new head of CC at our school who had a better idea of how to make and articulate fit?)

    It's very hard to know what is going to appeal to any school in any year. It's not just who is applying from your school, but the whole pool and the bucket your kid fills. It's hard to make sense of the dots on the scattergram without reading the files behind them as well.

    The only thing I will say is that no school with the admission rates you mentioned is anything but a reach for everyone. So realize that your son's stats mean he is a viable candidate, but it's far from a done deal. The ED pool includes a bunch of kids who were already "pre-selected" by coaches, programs like Questbridge, and development cases so his odds are not 30%.

    Good luck!
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