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Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

Running Start Students Admitted to Ivy Leagues?

gigi_egigi_e 1 replies1 threads New Member
Hi, right now I'm a junior doing running start (planning to get my AA) and have been looking at the discussions about RS here. I wanted to know if there was anyone accepted into Ivy League Schools that did running start and what their stats were. Also, I just signed up to self-study for some AP tests, and was wondering if it was worthwhile, especially since I am already taking college classes. Any Info helps!
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Replies to: Running Start Students Admitted to Ivy Leagues?

  • keikeikkeikeik 11 replies0 threads New Member
    edited November 8
    I know it's not exactly the answer you're looking for, but my friend got into Wellesley (so not an ivy but a sister-ivy - I think they also have cross enrollment with MIT) from a CC with a 3.97 just as a transfer. She didn't do RS and did just a year of CC out of High School.

    A good friend of mine also got into Dartmouth with a 3.7 and an amazing essay. He did RS senior year and then an additional year before applying as a transfer. He didn't get in when he applied as a freshman with a 4.0 and amazing sat/act scores and a great essay/extracurriculars, but got in as a transfer. I got to read his essay, and he talked a lot about humbleness and being able to grow during his freshman year in college.

    Since you're doing RS, I'm assuming you'll be applying as a freshman? Idk how true this is (esp. since admission stats seem to say its opposite), but from what I've seen, it seems like there's a better chance at admission applying as a transfer rather than a RS student as a freshman (even though you have college credits). I think out of high school, everyone pretty much has the same experiences, but once you're in college you have more opportunities to explore the type of person you are and write about it in your essay. I know more people who have gotten into Dartmouth, UPenn, and Cornell, that were transfers from CCs than I do from High School - and I went to a high school that was known for getting students into top 20 colleges.

    I think at the end of the day, RS does improve your chances but its really just dumb luck that the right admissions officer looks over your app. It's also important to stand out. Everyone who wants to get into an ivy is doing the best they can to maintain their gpa, take hard courses, get into leadership positions, etc. You might also have more luck posting this question in an ivy school forum, not sure why it's under UW.
    edited November 8
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  • gigi_egigi_e 1 replies1 threads New Member
    edited November 10
    @keikeik Thank you! I’m also not sure why the thread is under UW. Do you think it would be worthwhile for me to take AP tests this year, while doing running start?
    edited November 10
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78559 replies695 threads Senior Member
    Students who take college courses while in high school may want to take AP tests for the material if they are interested in colleges that are unfriendly to transfer credit from college courses, but accept AP credit in those subjects. Students should not expect double credit, just a greater chance of getting credit or placement.
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  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 42049 replies453 threads Senior Member
    RS students must apply as freshmen since they took college classes as HS students; freshmen get the best scholarships at colleges that offer merit and at the highly selective colleges that meet need like Ivy+/7sisters/NESCAC/Claremonts, it's MUCH easier to get in as a freshman since so few leave and there are very few spots for transfers.
    However once admitted you can get advanced standing (ie., you get the benefits of applying as a freshman then the benefits of your transfer credits).
    Note that it's not necessary to get the AA - you're better off taking classes that are considered challenging. If you've completed precalculus in HS, jump into calculus or statistics; take freshman composition but also comparative literature, western civ, or philosophy; you should have 3 challenging classes per semester or 2 per quarter but you should feel free to explore subjects not taught in high school for your 4th (and 5th) subjects.
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  • privatebankerprivatebanker 5334 replies77 threads Senior Member
    edited November 10
    Sure they do. You just probably will not receive credit for the classes themselves.

    The better feature is that you will be able to use these at many fine Universities and colleges if the Ivy League doesn't work out. If you knew how very small the number is that are just regular kids with great stats, I believe most would pass on the process. But people buy megabucks too because the odds don’t apply to us. Lol.

    Good luck!!
    edited November 10
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  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 6834 replies60 threads Senior Member
    I just signed up to self-study for some AP tests, and was wonder

    Self-studying for AP tests is useful only to the extent that you can be exempted from courses* (either skip the 101 and go to the usually more interesting 201). or fulfill a distribution requirement, or reduce the number of credits you need to take to graduate. The rules on all of those vary college by college, but in general the more selective the college the fewer of those benefits apply. Top schools almost always have a limit on the number of credits that can be applied towards graduation, and which & how many courses you can be exempted from. You don't get any admissions bump - at all- from self-studied APs.

    *unless you are applying to universities outside the US, where they can be part of the admissions process.
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