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How much does being international with great financial need hurt you?

xmasxmas Registered User Posts: 213 Junior Member
edited March 2009 in College Admissions
Take for instance a white kid (Joe) with 3.5 uw gPA, 1900 SAT and mediocre amount of ECs, compared with an international Asian kid (Bo) 3.9 uw GPA, 2280 SAT and LOTs of ECs and ridiculously hard courseload. Both demonstrate needy financial needs. Who would win in the admission process?

Also, (this is more relevant to me) how does a perminant resident (eligible for Federal aid) transferring compare with the freshmen admission process of an international? both are harder than the regular deal, but I don't have a clear picture of where I would need to within the next year or two. But I do understand that if I'm a college freshmen, they look at my HS stuff, and if I'm a sophomore, they look at my college stuff.

I'd love some stories and/or profiles.
Post edited by xmas on

Replies to: How much does being international with great financial need hurt you?

  • xmasxmas Registered User Posts: 213 Junior Member
    bump

    I want to get my transfer apps right this time
  • happymomof1happymomof1 Registered User Posts: 28,747 Senior Member
    You should ask this in the Transfer Forum or the International Forum. You can reach both of those by clicking on "Discussion Home" in the upper left of this screen and the scrolling down.

    Unless you are a true genius, being an international applicant with serious financial need is basically the kiss of death.

    Permanent Residents are eligible for federal financial aid, and consequently are not in the same financial aid pool as international students. They are in the financial aid pool with the citizens. Consequently, planning for transfer as a Permanent Resident is the same as planning for transfer as a citizen who has the same profile.
  • xmasxmas Registered User Posts: 213 Junior Member
    "Unless you are a true genius, being an international applicant with serious financial need is basically the kiss of death."

    U know that just made my day. Thank you
  • happymomof1happymomof1 Registered User Posts: 28,747 Senior Member
    If you are a permanent resident, you aren't in the international pool for financial aid. Just like the citizens, your financial need will only be a problem for admission at need-sensitive schools. The big question though is just exactly how much money you are going to need in order to pay for college. If your package is good, you may just want to stay put.

    Serious financial need is indeed problematic for "true" internationals. And frankly, they are better off knowing that up front so that they concentrate their efforts on schools that are likely to actually fund them instead of spending a bazillion dollars on exams, exam scores, application fees, etc. There are several "Gee if I'd known it would be this bad I'd have saved the application fees" threads in the International Forum started by people who learned this the hard way.

    Since you are in Iowa, why don't you call the admissions offices at ISU, one of the Iowa privates that you like, and one of the community colleges and ask them how they handle cases like yours. You also could take advantage of the Iowa Private Colleges Week this summer where you would be able to pose these kinds of questions to their admissions staffs in person.

    Wishing you all the best.
  • xmasxmas Registered User Posts: 213 Junior Member
    thanks mom!
  • hmom5hmom5 - Posts: 10,882 Senior Member
    And it especially hurt this year. Many schools cut the funds for internationals because of their own budget problems.
This discussion has been closed.