right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

Admission Stats 2010--Read 'Em But Don't Weep

24

Replies to: Admission Stats 2010--Read 'Em But Don't Weep

  • HGDuncanHGDuncan 1 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    My son is a junior and just got his scores from his first attempt at the SAT. He scored 600CR 630M 640W (58/11) for a total of 1870. I'm thinking these are pretty average scores. Thoughts......?
    · Reply · Share
  • ChasingRabbitsChasingRabbits 93 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    That they're above average, can probably be improved, are likely too low for admission into the very top schools, and are irrelevant to this thread.
    · Reply · Share
  • Skywalker23Skywalker23 780 replies121 threadsRegistered User Member
    "My son is a junior and just got his scores from his first attempt at the SAT. He scored 600CR 630M 640W (58/11) for a total of 1870. I'm thinking these are pretty average scores. Thoughts......?"

    They are above average.
    · Reply · Share
  • OldbatesieDocOldbatesieDoc 2020 replies39 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Right, a 2100-or even a 2400-isn't what it used to be. The fact is that while the population and applicant pool grow-for example, now a smart and fortunate young adult from China can apply to Harvard, too-the number of prestigious colleges has not, and so more kids compete for only a few more spots. Plus, because the kids know that even with fab stats, it's still only a 20-30% chance of being accepted, they apply to more schools-and so it goes...
    · Reply · Share
  • cantwaitforcllgecantwaitforcllge 19 replies2 threadsRegistered User New Member
    I think that superscoring the SATs has had a big effect on the overall scores of students. A few years ago, when my brother took the SATs you took the test late in Junior year and maybe one or two other times, as you didn't want to look like you were trying that hard, now kids start taking them Sophomore year and may take then 10 times, and it is making a difference. I have friends who took 8 SATIIs to get the best scores they could as the bad ones would never be seen. As a result, most of the competitive schools scores have jumped a lot more then in the past.
    · Reply · Share
  • OlvBabsheOlvBabshe 40 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Someone message me the link? Thanks.

    [email protected]
    · Reply · Share
  • xpertboyxpertboy 3 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Selective schools like Harvard, Stanford, and many of the other Ivy Leagues are pressed by boards of trustees to turn away most of the people who apply. Certain quotas must be fulfilled first before most of us even see a glimmer of hope in the mail in the form of an acceptance letter. First criteria is what type of students can make us the most money, and from what regions of the world. Also what diversity ethnic groups to get in first to satisfy that criteria. Then they start looking at other applicants who don't fit into any quota requirements. You getting in has nothing to do with luck. Your best chance of getting into one of these elite and selective colleges is through rolling admissions. Start applying immediately at the start of fall in high school. Rolling admissions start september and go through June. Admissions offices in the big schools including Ivy Leagues are less selective during early rolling admissions.
    · Reply · Share
  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone 3016 replies1113 threadsCC Admissions Expert Senior Member
    Rolling admissions start september and go through June. Admissions offices in the big schools including Ivy Leagues are less selective during early rolling admissions.


    ????

    Ivies and many so-called "elite" colleges do not offer Rolling Admission.
    · Reply · Share
  • motion12345motion12345 1492 replies92 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I guess I was reaching too high. Whatever.
    · Reply · Share
  • itryitry 480 replies68 threadsRegistered User Member
    I actually think there is less deal about stats in the Ivies because many students are ledto think if they get good scores they can get into anywhere they want. If you look at Princetons average gpa, it's around a 3.86. And although that's extremely high (at least for my school, where there's lots of grade deflation), that's not as high as Berkleys and some other of those schools. I think nowadays they look for students who are still focused on their future and not their numbers.
    · Reply · Share
  • motion12345motion12345 1492 replies92 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I think nowadays they look for students who are still focused on their future and not their numbers

    No. They don't.
    · Reply · Share
  • chaosakitachaosakita 1294 replies145 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Even Brown's admit rate has dropped below 10%. What am I going to do?
    · Reply · Share
  • roderickroderick 1108 replies380 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    motion, have you been trying for IVYs only? What about the other top ranked schools?

    What is the cut off for 'very' or 'most' selective schools?

    Wouldn't it be a school where your hard numbers are , what, within (above?) the mid 50 pct of the standardized test scores and your GPA/rank is within the highest frequency of the last freshman class, but you are still not a lock to get in?

    If you do not get in when your hard numbers would get you in, then it must be other factors such character, ECs, and demographic profile. As another poster suggested above, apparently there are unpublished (vs fully disclosed such as the hard numbers) quota that admission people have especially in the very selective colleges. This last part - that the quotas are not published - makes it hard to see why one did not get in.

    It would be nice if the rejection letter said something like, 'we already have enough of your X demographic'.
    · Reply · Share
  • insidiousintentinsidiousintent 12 replies2 threadsRegistered User New Member
    I had a 2100 SAT score, attend a public Italian school, speak and write 5 languages, read Latin, have decent grades and an everlasting experience in photography, an internship at the German Parliament last year, have applied to 5 Ivies and got rejected.
    I tried, and failed. But I had fun. Instead, I got into NYU LS, BU and JHU. The result wasn't that bad - even though the Ivies will always constitute my dream schools.

    One never knows, so I tried, and gave them my fine 75$ share :D
    · Reply · Share
  • sneva831sneva831 52 replies8 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    i used to think that too, and i judged myself by looking at SAT and ACT stats in the 2008 FISKE guide.
    then i was rejected.

    looks like standards have changed absurdly in the last 2-3 years.
    · Reply · Share
  • Eagles17Eagles17 52 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I feel like maybe people are putting too much on the Ivy League. I am a high school senior so I just got all my decisions back yesterday, and having gone through at least the admissions process, my main advice would be: apply to schools you would realistically see yourself attending and where you think you'd be happy.

    I only applied to 8 schools, 6 of which were reach (my guidance counselor was NOT happy, hehe), but before I narrowed my list, I had Princeton, Harvard, and MIT on there. After visiting, I realized that even though I'd attend, I didn't think I'd be happy at those schools.

    Lesson: don't wait $85 on the application fee (and sending SAT scores fee and sometimes CSS Profile fee! -- it builds up) if you wouldn't want to attend! It would suck having an amazing financial aid offer from a school you don't really want to attend and being "forced" to consider settling.

    Plus, you never know what colleges are looking for - I was straight out rejected by Penn State, then waitlisted by UPenn. And since we mentioned demographics, if it matters any, I'm a middle class Asian female from NJ.

    Insidiousintent, I'm so sorry you were rejected from all 5. However, you sound like an amazing person who is definitely driven and will achieve a lot in life.

    I say that if you really want to attend, show it through your application, and apply! It can't hurt, and it would suck having those "what if" regrets if you don't even try. Best of luck to everyone!
    · Reply · Share
  • Eagles17Eagles17 52 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Hahaha, I liked the article titled "Wherever you go for college, they're all wannabe Hogwarts anyways."
    · Reply · Share
  • Old College TryOld College Try 304 replies6 threadsRegistered User Member
    Ultimately here's waht bothers me about the Ivies encouraging applicants who don't stand a chance. Decisions came out yesterday for the Ivies. I've spoken to around 12 classmates who are absolutely devastated by their rejections. I mean crushed. They'll get over it, of course, but there a great deal of pain felt when 4 months (or more) of hoping and dreaming come crashing in on you with the click of a mouse. The Ivies seem to think we're unfeeling robots that they can use to pull down their acceptance numbers, but pretty much every rejection results in a great deal of pain.

    My mom insists that when she was in high school few kids ever dreamed of attending an Ivy. I am not sure what happened over the last 30 years but for many of us getting into an Ivy (or schools like Stanford, MIT, Cal Tech) have become the meansuring stick of our self-worth. Personally, I wish USNWR never existed and I wish Ivies would realize how much pain is caused when young people who never had a realistic prayer of getting accepted are convinced that they, too, have a shot.
    · Reply · Share
  • OlivertwistOlivertwist 80 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    at princeton:

    roughly 13,650 had a combined score of 2,100 or higher on the three sections of the SAT

    the other half of the applicant pool didn't even have higher than a 2100.

    shows who you are really competing against.
    · Reply · Share
  • just a girljust a girl 181 replies31 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @olivertwist: the only people i know who got into princeton were athletic recruits with less than 1800 SAT scores and below-average GPAs for my high school (i.e., the bottom 50% of the class).

    so don't say that those with less than 2100s don't get in; they do. in fact, about a quarter of princeton's class is made up of athletic recruits, often with sub-par grades and SAT scores. doesn't mean princeton doesn't want them...

    so in reality, the "middle 50%" of scores that USNWR ranks is deflated by the Ivy athletic recruits.
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity