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Admission Stats 2010--Read 'Em But Don't Weep

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Replies to: Admission Stats 2010--Read 'Em But Don't Weep

  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,985 Senior Member
    In my experience, there are many more outstanding applicants who are turned away by the Ivies (and other hyper-selective colleges) than there are those who were reaching far too high by applying.

    Over the years I've been told by admission officials from two different Ivy League schools that they actually cried when moving their favorite folders into the "out" pile. (So if you were rejected by any top-choice college, don't assume that someone behind those closed doors didn't love you and lobby for you. Often the candidates that admission folks "like" the best are denied nonetheless for a range of reasons.)

    And as for students who are unrealistic applicants to begin with, sometimes it's the colleges themselves that are to blame. I've seen students in my orbit receive encouraging mail from an Ivy when, in fact, these kids don't have the slightest prayer of ever being admitted.

    While I would never insist that an advisee not try for "dream school," no matter how steep the odds, I do find myself often pointing out that there is a big difference between a letter that says "We want you to apply" and one that actually says, "We want you."
  • MontegutMontegut Registered User Posts: 6,124 Senior Member
    I think OCT's teacher has a very good point. Because my son did well on the ACT and SAT, and then got National Merit Semifinalist, he was led to believe that he could get into a top school, and that he would surely get excellent scholarships at lesser ranked, but good, privates/parochial. Still, we encouraged son to apply to "lower ranked" out of state schools that would offer him excellent scholarships based on his scores and NM standing. Thank goodness he did. His private/parochial choices gave him good scholarships, but would still require us to take out 20 to 30K a year in loans. He applied to a few of the top 10 cc school, one of which is local, and they were obligated to accept him, one in the south that waitlisted him, and one in the northeast that rejected him. However, the "lesser ranked" southern state schools each offered him full tuition, some with housing included, and some with everything paid, plus perks. These "lesser ranked" schools "showed him the love". He was accepted into their wonderful honors programs and was able to choose which one was the best fit. There's a lot to be said about going to a place that wants you.
  • motion12345motion12345 Registered User Posts: 1,584 Senior Member
    How do you define those that are 'reaching far too high by applying?'

    I mean, I have a 2220 SAT I score and a 3.75 unweighted GPA at a fairly competitive suburban public school and, based on those alone, I'm starting to have a feeling that I was reaching far too high by applying...
  • ChasingRabbitsChasingRabbits Registered User Posts: 95 Junior Member
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take."

    -Wayne Gretzky
  • glidoglido Registered User Posts: 5,962 Senior Member
    Sally made some very good points. Many of you guys ARE Ivy material, but the Ivies don't have room for all of you. Also, the Admissions Committees are fallible, just because you are worthy of admission to their university does not mean that they are going to figure that out. The good news is that the AdComms do not define you. That is your job and yours alone.
  • HGDuncanHGDuncan Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
    My son is a junior and just got his scores from his first attempt at the SAT. He scored 600CR 630M 640W (58/11) for a total of 1870. I'm thinking these are pretty average scores. Thoughts......?
  • ChasingRabbitsChasingRabbits Registered User Posts: 95 Junior Member
    That they're above average, can probably be improved, are likely too low for admission into the very top schools, and are irrelevant to this thread.
  • Skywalker23Skywalker23 Registered User Posts: 901 Member
    "My son is a junior and just got his scores from his first attempt at the SAT. He scored 600CR 630M 640W (58/11) for a total of 1870. I'm thinking these are pretty average scores. Thoughts......?"

    They are above average.
  • OldbatesieDocOldbatesieDoc Registered User Posts: 2,056 Senior Member
    Right, a 2100-or even a 2400-isn't what it used to be. The fact is that while the population and applicant pool grow-for example, now a smart and fortunate young adult from China can apply to Harvard, too-the number of prestigious colleges has not, and so more kids compete for only a few more spots. Plus, because the kids know that even with fab stats, it's still only a 20-30% chance of being accepted, they apply to more schools-and so it goes...
  • cantwaitforcllgecantwaitforcllge Registered User Posts: 21 New Member
    I think that superscoring the SATs has had a big effect on the overall scores of students. A few years ago, when my brother took the SATs you took the test late in Junior year and maybe one or two other times, as you didn't want to look like you were trying that hard, now kids start taking them Sophomore year and may take then 10 times, and it is making a difference. I have friends who took 8 SATIIs to get the best scores they could as the bad ones would never be seen. As a result, most of the competitive schools scores have jumped a lot more then in the past.
  • OlvBabsheOlvBabshe Registered User Posts: 42 Junior Member
    Someone message me the link? Thanks.

    [email protected]
  • xpertboyxpertboy Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
    Selective schools like Harvard, Stanford, and many of the other Ivy Leagues are pressed by boards of trustees to turn away most of the people who apply. Certain quotas must be fulfilled first before most of us even see a glimmer of hope in the mail in the form of an acceptance letter. First criteria is what type of students can make us the most money, and from what regions of the world. Also what diversity ethnic groups to get in first to satisfy that criteria. Then they start looking at other applicants who don't fit into any quota requirements. You getting in has nothing to do with luck. Your best chance of getting into one of these elite and selective colleges is through rolling admissions. Start applying immediately at the start of fall in high school. Rolling admissions start september and go through June. Admissions offices in the big schools including Ivy Leagues are less selective during early rolling admissions.
  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,985 Senior Member
    Rolling admissions start september and go through June. Admissions offices in the big schools including Ivy Leagues are less selective during early rolling admissions.


    ????

    Ivies and many so-called "elite" colleges do not offer Rolling Admission.
  • motion12345motion12345 Registered User Posts: 1,584 Senior Member
    I guess I was reaching too high. Whatever.
  • itryitry Registered User Posts: 548 Member
    I actually think there is less deal about stats in the Ivies because many students are ledto think if they get good scores they can get into anywhere they want. If you look at Princetons average gpa, it's around a 3.86. And although that's extremely high (at least for my school, where there's lots of grade deflation), that's not as high as Berkleys and some other of those schools. I think nowadays they look for students who are still focused on their future and not their numbers.
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