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in the right track?

lsmlhj5lsmlhj5 Registered User Posts: 4 New Member
edited July 2010 in College Admissions
Hi i'm currently a junior in the midwest regions, and i was was wondering if i m in the right track to go to an ivy-level school.
Well, to start with, i immigrated to the states last year so i have little EC done (especially volunteer work.) and i doubt i ll ever get a leadership role in sports because there's never been an asian team captain at our school. so i m really worried. :(
anyways this is my gpa etc.. from sophomore year
G.P.A- 3.7(unweighted)
4.6(weighted) i m taking higher level classes so weighted gpa should be higher junior year.
act nd sat- going to take it this october
sport- track(varsity)
wrestling(jv)
soccer(varsity)
volunteer work - around 50~100 hr done...

is this enough? i m looking to apply to schools like ND, U of C, and Northwestern. if not, plz give some guidelines :)
Post edited by lsmlhj5 on

Replies to: in the right track?

  • glassesarechicglassesarechic Registered User Posts: 5,487 Senior Member
    Focus on your unweighted (rather than weighted) GPA--that's what colleges use for admissions (though they take a more general idea of course rigor into consideration as well). Make your SATs scores as high as they can possibly be--there is not some sort of score threshold, above which increases in score are arbitrary. Consider dropping a sport if you don't have time to keep your grades up or prepare for the SATs. And remember that it's not the number of ECs or the number of volunteer hours that will get you in. You should be intensely devoted to one or two core activities, even within volunteering (ie, don't just do scattered community service; work with one organization--or start your own!).

    And consider ED at Northwestern if that becomes a favorite of yours.
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