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How Rigid Are Assignment Submission Deadlines?

EastCoastKid123EastCoastKid123 Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
edited September 2018 in College Life
I'm guessing that it can depend on what school you go to and how intense it is, but I'm wondering how concerned I should be right now about submitting a paper 20 minutes past the deadline. I'm a freshman at a "selective/ somewhat rigorous" university and I just completed a homework assignment for a class by submitting it through the online portal. The syllabus says that these submissions are due by 11:59 PM Sunday night and anything past then will be accepted, but you will receive 0 credit for the assignment. I submitted the essay at 12:21 AM, am I screwed? **Some things to keep in mind: It's the second week of classes, we're still in the add/drop period for the fall semester, and I've already noticed that many things stated in the syllabus for other classes aren't typically the actual rules that the teacher ends up enforcing (For example, a mandatory attendance policy for a gen ed class with no exceptions for unexcused absences without a major penalty on your grade.)
Post edited by skieurope on
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Replies to: How Rigid Are Assignment Submission Deadlines?

  • WeLoveLymanWeLoveLyman Registered User Posts: 247 Junior Member
    Generally, very rigid. A handful of professors might cut you some slack, but that's not the norm. If the syllabus explicitly says nothing will be accepted past 11:59 PM, then that will stand. Of course, you can try to talk to the professor and give him or her a good reason as to why you submitted the paper late--usually, computer issues, etc. are not good excuses. I wouldn't bank on sympathy, though. On the bright side, you have the rest of the semester to make up for it.

    Good luck!
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 36,747 Senior Member
    You can only know if you contact the prof. We can’t answer for them. They would be well well within their rights to give you a zero, so I wouldn’t squak if they do. The deadline is in the syllabus and you missed it. Dropping the class due one zero seems nuts to me, in case that is why you mentioned the drop/add window.
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,537 Senior Member
    You need to ask the prof, but I think it is pretty clear you will get a 0.

    If I were a prof and said no late papers, I stand by that because that's what's fair to everyone.
  • EastCoastKid123EastCoastKid123 Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    I put the add/drop note in there because there are still people joining the class, so the professor isn't exactly enforcing deadlines for in-class assignments right now- everything is pretty much just due when the add/drop deadline ends tomorrow night.
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,537 Senior Member
    You asked what would happen if you are late and I answered. If you want a different answer, ask the professor.

    Don't be late. Don't miss deadlines. It will bite you.
  • bjkmombjkmom Registered User Posts: 7,820 Senior Member
    I agree.

    My daughter, also a college freshman, had an accounting assignment due at midnight last night. She had massive computer issues, and as a result only got to the assignment after dinner. She was pretty stressed.

    What I told her was to get to as much as she could-- easiest, quickest problems first-- but to be SURE to hit "SUBMIT" no later than 11:30-- and that's after either printing or taking screen shots. Doing well was less important than meeting the deadline-- she could always explain the computer issues.

    Deadlines tend not to be fluid things, in college or in real life.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 42,950 Super Moderator
    edited September 2018
    In my experience, they're rigid. I've had more than one syllabus state "The deadline for submission is 11:59 p.m. Please plan accordingly. Your computer/network issues are not my issue."
    For example, a mandatory attendance policy for a gen ed class with no exceptions for unexcused absences without a major penalty on your grade.
    You have no access to others' grades, or at least with FERPA, you shouldn't. So you really should not make such assumptions. But more importantly, you need to worry about your own grade, not others'.
    Post edited by skieurope on
  • CheddarcheeseMNCheddarcheeseMN Registered User Posts: 3,220 Senior Member
    Let us know if you get a zero. I prefer policies where late work is penalized by x% up to the next class period when it then is worth zero, but with online submissions you do need to try to submit earlier than the last minute.
  • yourmommayourmomma Registered User Posts: 1,287 Senior Member
    --usually, computer issues, etc. are not good excuses.
    You're computer/network issues are not my isssue.

    Right. That because technology never fails.

    I hate deadlines like that. What the heck is 11:59 pm. That's the middle of the day for college students. Why not 8:00 am the next morning. What difference does it make when most normal people are sleeping. There are very few rigid deadlines in real life. Most people are reasonable and flexible.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 42,950 Super Moderator
    That because technology never fails.
    As they say in the Army - 7Ps
    What the heck is 11:59 pm.
    It's better than due at the start of class for some students.
    There are very few rigid deadlines in real life.
    The IRS, for one, does.
    Most people are reasonable and flexible.
    His/her class, his/her rules. Don't want to follow the rules? Then don't take the class.

    Yes if there are exceptional unforeseen circumstances, the student can ask for an extension. But really, the whole notion of "I know that's what it says in the syllabus,but I didn't think you were serious" is ridiculous.
  • yourmommayourmomma Registered User Posts: 1,287 Senior Member
    ^^^^

    Actually, the IRS is very flexible. They start with an automatic extension that is easy to file. No excuse necessary. You can also amend your returns. Try amending that term paper. :)

    And I get the rules thing. But rules should have some sense to them. Not just be "I'm King, so I said so."

    I had a teacher in HS who learned that the hard way. He had a hard, no extensions, turn in rule on a major term paper. First day of class, he emphasized it. Paper was like 50% or more of the grade. For years all was well. Until the one year a young lady came to class to turn in her paper. Turned out her mother died a night or two before and was she afraid to ask for an extension. Reality hit him in the face that day and he felt really bad. He has since updated his "no exceptions" speech.
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 36,747 Senior Member
    11:59 promotes healthier sleep habits than 8 am. But the deadline specifics aren’t the issue.
  • happy1happy1 Forum Champion Parents, Forum Champion Admissions Posts: 24,207 Forum Champion
    edited September 2018
    You should be concerned. Deadlines are called deadlines for a reason. Based on the syllabus I would assume your assignment will get a zero. You might want to email the professor, apologize for the late assignment, let him/her know if there was a good reason it was late (do not make a flimsy excuse -- better to say nothing if there was no good reason), and ask if there is a chance the assignment might be accepted with any penalty the professor deems appropriate.

    Take this as a lesson and get assignments in on time going forward.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 42,950 Super Moderator
    edited September 2018
    They start with an automatic extension that is easy to file.
    But you have to file the extension first, which presumably the student could have also done. Sometimes asking for extensions in advance will elicit a more positive response than making an excuse after the deadline. Either of which I would do before coming to an internet site and asking "am I screwed?":)
  • pkchamp89pkchamp89 Registered User Posts: 612 Member
    edited September 2018
    Do yourself a favor and learn quickly to follow the directions that the professor has put forth. Many times there is no gray area. Another scenario to be careful with is on tests or exams. In my son’s first year he included extra work on a math exam that the professor did not ask for. Although correct, the professor deducted points. The professor said the extra work was indeed correct but he hadn’t asked for it. He learned to follow directions very quickly from that point on.
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