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Is this sentence awkward for an essay?

ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
edited January 9 in College Essays
I submitted this line on my essay and now I am pretty worried that it is incorrect.

"I’ve always been someone who loves to learn concepts beyond my concepts through exploration."

Is it alright or...?
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Replies to: Is this sentence awkward for an essay?

  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 56,069 Senior Member
    It is what it is. You already submitted.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    @jym626 does it seem awkward or will colleges be like ' meh. doesn't matter '? by the way, it is not a sentence of my common app essay. I have taken a gap year and I didnt apply to colleges in my senior year. This is my essay to explain my break in education progression i.e. gap year essay.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 56,069 Senior Member
    Hard to opine about a sentence out of context.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    @jym626
    Here is some context :

    "I engaged in a science research project for around three months. I’ve always been someone who loves to learn concepts beyond my concepts through exploration. Taking a gap year allowed me to fulfill this motive" ..... and so on where I describe what the research was about
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 30,654 Senior Member
    The question is, what does "concepts beyond my concepts" mean? Usually, we'd suggest a synonym for one of those.

    But don't worry, at ths point.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    @lookingforward I wanted to convey that I loved learning new concepts, hence, stating " loves to learn concepts beyond my concepts ( knowledge ) " I thought it seemed okay that time but not feeling good right now,, :/
  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 5,449 Senior Member
    edited January 9
    The good news is that your intended meaning is clear even though not expressed in the best fashion.

    At the very least, you should have placed an adjective before the second "concepts". Or just said " I want to expand upon my current knowledge of scientific concepts through experimentation."


    "I engaged in a three month science research project in an effort to expand upon my current knowledge of scientific concepts."
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 30,654 Senior Member
    I believe they'll get your point, @ItsComingHome. I don't think you need to worry. Best wishes.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 9,029 Senior Member
    edited January 9
    You've written a creative sentence if the reader were to follow your implied emphasis: "I’ve always been someone who loves to learn concepts beyond my concepts through exploration." With this interpretation, your multiple usage of "concepts" appears intentional rather than inadvertent.

    For a conventional construction, you might try something like this in the future: "I’ve always been someone who loves to challenge my intellectual preconceptions through physical exploration."

    You've received good advice not to worry though.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    Thanks for your comment.
  • LoveTheBardLoveTheBard Registered User Posts: 2,012 Senior Member
    I agree that you should not worry about it.

    Given that your reader will be doing a quick read, there are three or four things that are likely to happen: 1) they won't notice; 2) they will semi-notice but assume that they misread; 3) they will notice but assume you had a typo and accidentally repeated the same word and didn't catch it when proofreading; 4) they will spend time trying to figure out what you meant.

    The last is the least likely possibility; I would place money on the first. Not a big deal.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    edited January 10
    Hope the first happens.
    Do you have an idea of how much time an admissions officer spends on each application during the RD application? How does it work?
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 30,654 Senior Member
    Roughly, if we generalize, 12-20 minutes, per read. A number will read your app. They're looking for match. Academically, in thinking, and more. Match is more than stats and titles.

    We're telling you not to worry. It's in their hands now. Many factors apply, a number of those beyond your control.
  • ItsComingHomeItsComingHome Registered User Posts: 25 Junior Member
    Thanks for the info
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