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If I take a dual enrollment class am I exempt from taking it in college?

asianeekamkeeasianeekamkee Registered User Posts: 331 Member
edited June 2012 in College Life
I'm currently a junior going to be a senior in high school.

I'm thinking of taking World history as a dual enrollment course.

If I pass the class, am I exempt from taking World history during college?
Post edited by asianeekamkee on

Replies to: If I take a dual enrollment class am I exempt from taking it in college?

  • asianeekamkeeasianeekamkee Registered User Posts: 331 Member
    ....seriously?!?! No replies? ; _ ; someone hello?
  • exultationsyexultationsy Registered User Posts: 1,100 Senior Member
    Sorry to be unhelpful, but it depends on what college you end up at. If you end up at the college where you're taking it, likely yes. For the rest, it'll be a totally mixed bag.
  • b@r!um[email protected]!um Registered User Posts: 10,373 Senior Member
    I agree with exultationsy that policies vary a lot between schools. Here are a few examples:

    My own undergraduate college only accepted dual enrollment courses for transfer credits if they did not satisfy a high school graduation requirement. (I.e. taking a college course on top of your regular high school work would get you transfer credit, but not taking the college course instead of a high school course.)

    Another college one mile down the road would give you general credits, but not count high school transfer credits towards general education requirements. You would still have to start the social science requirement from scratch. (History courses are one option to satisfy their social science requirement, but you can also choose courses from other disciplines such as economics, political science, sociology, psychology or anthropology. In other words: you wouldn't be forced to retake a class whose material you already know.)

    Yet another college in the city would give you transfer credit and waive a general education requirement.

    Please note that very few colleges have a "world history" requirement. When there is a history requirement, the courses are typically a lot more specific than your generic high school "world history" class. (e.g. "Formation of Islamic Near East" or "Gender, Sex and Power in Early Modern Europe" or "Russia from 1800-1917")
  • romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes Registered User Posts: 33,837 Senior Member
    Ask your college, not us.
  • SikorskySikorsky Registered User Posts: 5,851 Senior Member
    ....seriously?!?! No replies? ; _ ; someone hello?

    For goodness' sake, it hadn't even been 20 minutes when you posted this! This isn't a telephone call. It's an internet message board, and there are no operators standing by to take your call. Furthermore, according to what I see here on my screen, when you were posting, it was after 3:00 a.m. in the east, and after midnight on the west coast. On a Tuesday morning yet.

    But now you've got your answer, which is, "How the heck are we supposed to know?"
  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse Registered User Posts: 26,432 Senior Member
    The answer, as others have said, depends on the specific college. My kids colleges were generous in accepting dual enrollment courses even from community colleges, but that is not everyone's experience. Sometimes, taking such a course would just permit you to use it fulfill preqs and allow you to take a more advanced course but not give you college credit. Some schools don't even do that. They may have a departmental exam for placement regardless of whether or not you have taken college courses in that discipline.

    My son's college was peculiar in that they were generous in accepting any credits, AP and college courses taken during high school, but the math department still tested you for placement for all but the most rudimentary courses. They have had too much experience in students taking advanced calc or linear algebra because they took the prereqs elsewhere and then found out that the courses they took were inadequate in preparing them for the rigor of that college's math curriculum. So you got the credit, well and good, but if you wanted to use them as a stepping stone,you had to take the departmental exam as did anyone who wanted to take the upper level courses who did not take the foundation courses at the college.

    So you have those extremes. Some colleges will not give you the credit but will let you take advanced courses based on the what you have taken elsewhere, and there are colleges that will give you the credit but not let you procede on that basis without a probe as to what material was actually covered.

    Then, you can get the courses to count as general credits towards graduation, but not as specific departmental credits. SUNY Buffalo , for example, will take 3s on AP exams, and permit those subjects to fulfil general credits but you can't use them to replace specific courses. You have to retake them. I've seen schools take that stance for college courses taken during high school, in dual enrollment AND/OR courses just taken. The grade in the course could make the difference too.
  • asianeekamkeeasianeekamkee Registered User Posts: 331 Member
    Ask your college, not us.

    @romanigypsyeyes Well.. it is COLLEGE confidential so why not?

    I'm not limiting myself to this website, i'm using this as one of my sources. I know there's a lot of experienced people here, so as might as well ask here too.

    @Sikorsky ... well do you not see those posts all over you haha? xD Maybe you don't know, but the others do. LOLOL.

    Thank you guys for the replies. The colleges I aim for is all the top UC's (UC SAN DIEGO ahem ahem.. dream schooool ; u ;.. UCLA, UCB.. or others) and maybe just maybe a few Ivies? (meh Cornell, or Brown, if i'm lucky) I'll research~
  • romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes Registered User Posts: 33,837 Senior Member
    @romanigypsyeyes Well.. it is COLLEGE confidential so why not?

    Because this is a college-specific question and we don't go to YOUR college.
  • asianeekamkeeasianeekamkee Registered User Posts: 331 Member
    Because this is a college-specific question and we don't go to YOUR college.

    Still no harm in asking ~. There's people here that do know this stuff like the other people that posted.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 73,774 Senior Member
    The colleges I aim for is all the top UC's (UC SAN DIEGO ahem ahem.. dream schooool ; u ;.. UCLA, UCB.. or others) and maybe just maybe a few Ivies? (meh Cornell, or Brown, if i'm lucky) I'll research~

    The UCs should accept transferable community college courses as listed on Welcome to ASSIST . Other schools may vary on what they accept.
  • SikorskySikorsky Registered User Posts: 5,851 Senior Member
    @Sikorsky ... well do you not see those posts all over you haha? xD Maybe you don't know, but the others do. LOLOL.

    I can't believe I'm allowing myself to be drawn into this, but.... What I actually see "all over [me]" above is "it depends," "policies vary," and "ask your college." In my book, that pretty much squares with, "How the heck are we supposed to know?" Particularly when you don't even know yet where you're going to be a student.

    And my real objection wasn't to your asking, even though I think it's kind of an absurdly broad question, and one for which the only answer that matters is the one you get at the college where you actually enroll, rather than the ones you get from strangers online. My objection was to that ridiculous bumping.

    Oh, I almost forgot: haha, xD, LOLOL.
  • asianeekamkeeasianeekamkee Registered User Posts: 331 Member
    @Sikorsky. http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/high-school-life/1346231-if-i-take-dual-enrollment-course-am-i-exempt-taking-class-college.html

    Well this dude knows.

    You sure like arguing now don't you? And apparently you were drawn to this. Was I looking for a specific answer? I don't think so, I was looking for opinions and insights, and people who are currently in college and been through this kind of stuff, not specifics.

    Oh and nice imitation of me. I admit it's kinda creepy coming from a guy in his 40's.
This discussion has been closed.