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Birth control vending machines installed in college campuses

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Replies to: Birth control vending machines installed in college campuses

  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 31,202 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    As a freshman, D1 sent me a pic of the big box of them in her dorm floor's main bathroom. I never saw them, btw, when visiting.
  • PheebersPheebers Registered User Posts: 622 Member
    I'd love to see BC go over the counter. And an awful lot of stress would be prevented by those vending machines. Not every kid can talk to their parents or even get to the health center on campus. Just make it easy, for Pete's sake! Why wouldn't you?
  • FireflyLightsFireflyLights Registered User Posts: 213 Junior Member
    edited June 2017
    Not having the pill available over-the-counter is pretty silly at this point. The vast majority of people don't have problems associated with it. It's no more dangerous than asperin or advil, and it can have a hugely positive impact on quality of life, and not just by preventing unplanned pregnancies (which is huge). I am not sexually active, but I am on the pill for seriously messed up periods (I was having a period every other week - my doctor was very worried about me developing anemia because I was bleeding so much). I was lucky that my parents were willing to consider BC as a treatment. Many parents refuse to allow their daughters to go on BC, and so they suffer pain, discomfort, and sometimes more serious medical complications. If BC were OTC, it would be so much easier for a young woman to discreetly buy some packets of birth control and avoid all that.

    Many over the counter drugs can have adverse side effects when used incorrectly, but we as a society have decided to treat people like adults who can read a label and make decisions for their own bodies. Prescriptions are necessary when a drugs require a professional to monitor their use for a variety of possible reasons. Normal BC pills have proven to not really be in that category. It's time to treat women like adults and let them control their own health.
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 19,516 Senior Member
    Baskets of free condoms are readily available in some college's bathrooms.
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 2,036 Senior Member
    Condoms are not as effective as birth control pills.
  • philbegasphilbegas Registered User Posts: 2,997 Senior Member
    That's true. When used properly, birth control pills are 99.9% effective whereas condoms are only 98% effective :0.
  • philbegasphilbegas Registered User Posts: 2,997 Senior Member
    But only one of those causes weight fluctuation, acne, etc.
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 19,516 Senior Member
    And only one helps prevent STDs.
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 2,036 Senior Member
    So birth control pills shouldn't be available OTC because they can cause weight fluctuations and acne and don't help prevent STDs?
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 19,516 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    My point in bringing up the "free in baskets" was related to talk of them being available in vending machines. They are actually more readably accessible in many places. I did not relate that to OTC availability. If folks are unconcerned about side effects, please make contact lenses available without an annual eye exam, too, please. As well as other things I could think of.

    Additionally, as someone mentioned previously, a huge downside to OTC is the cost. It's a GOP way of not having to pay for them through health insurance coverage. Be careful what you wish for.
  • Sue22Sue22 Registered User Posts: 5,830 Senior Member
    ^^ And using both condoms and the pill is more effective than either alone.
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 2,036 Senior Member
    Virtually any OTC medicine can have side effects. So nothing should be OTC.
  • Sue22Sue22 Registered User Posts: 5,830 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    I think there should be some kind of initial consultation as well but I do have to point out that the reason you need an annual eye exam for glasses/contacts is that prescriptions change.

    It's the same reason you got your kids' feet measured at the shoe store each year, not because of any danger, but because what you needed changed.
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 2,036 Senior Member
    I have worn the same contact prescription for the last 15 years. Still have to get a script. I think you could argue they shouldn't be necessary. If your script does change and you keep getting the old one that is on you. Vast majority of people would get a new one.
  • philbegasphilbegas Registered User Posts: 2,997 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    Just to clarify, OTC means that it's non-prescription but you have to actually ask the pharmacist for it right?

    I'm fortunate enough to have a GF with an IUD so I don't really ever think about this stuff.
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